Tag Archives: University Press Week

#ReadUP in the Community: Throwback to the Future

This week, we’re celebrating University Press Week, which highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society.

The theme of 2016’s #UPWeek is COMMUNITY, and, for us, that means honoring the people we serve through our mission to publish academic books of high scholarly merit in a variety of fields and to publish significant books about the history and culture of Kentucky, the Ohio Valley region, the Upper South, and Appalachia.

Download your own UPK #ReadUP Bookmark!

University Presses have been around a long time—the oldest, continuously operated UP, Johns Hopkins University Press, was founded in 1878! When you include University Presses like Cambridge and Oxford, university press publishing has been influencing scholarship and society for more than 200 years. In all that time, UPs have had to adapt to changing ideas in academia, changes in the market, and changes in readership—both culturally and technologically.

In 2016, University Presses continue to accommodate new and emerging scholarship and sustain research and public knowledge through initiatives that benefit their community. Click through to explore a few forward-thinking endeavors from AAUP member presses.

Yale University Press

Yale explores the future of communities through their title, City of Tomorrow.

Indiana University Press

IU Press authors talk about their favorite Indiana books and authors in preparation for Indiana University’s upcoming bicentennial celebration.

Seminary Co-op Bookstores

Seminary Co-op Bookstores shares a Front Table newsletter from the 80s.

University of Michigan Press

Focusing on digital scholarship, UMP highlights their innovative Gabii project that allows users to engage with scholarship via a gaming platform, and the Fulcrum platform that they beta launched just a few weeks ago.

Columbia University Press

In order to look forward at possibilities for future collaboration between university presses, Columbia looks back at the history of their South Asia Across the Disciplines series, jointly published by the University of California Press, the University of Chicago Press, and Columbia University Press.

MIT Press

A look back at the MIT Press Bookstore and a look forward to their new location.

University of Toronto Press Journals

Throwing it back to the evolution of UTP Journals and the development of their online platforms.

University of Georgia Press

UGA Press shares their collaborative efforts to organize the Charleston Syllabus Symposium in September.

IPR License

IPR License shares how they are building a community of university presses on its onlight rights platform and helping them to increase their revenue stream from backlist rights sales.

 

#ReadUP in the Community: Spotlight on Staff

This week, we’re celebrating University Press Week, which highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society.

The theme of 2016’s #UPWeek is COMMUNITY, and, for us, that means honoring the people we serve through our mission to publish academic books of high scholarly merit in a variety of fields and to publish significant books about the history and culture of Kentucky, the Ohio Valley region, the Upper South, and Appalachia.

Download your own UPK #ReadUP Bookmark!

From volunteerism, to mentorships, and staff members with not-so-hidden talents and passions, our friends at AAUP member presses around the world are servicing their communities in myriad amazing ways. Here are just a few examples:

Wayne State University Press

WSUP highlights their new in-house designer as part of their “Shelf-Talkers” series.

University of Washington Press

Mellon University Press Diversity Fellow Niccole Leilanionapae’aina Coggins on community and food sovereignty.

University Press of Mississippi

UPM Project Editor Valerie Jones discusses her volunteer work for a Jackson spay/neuter clinic .

University of Wisconsin Press

Production manager Terry Emmrich, who is also a fine art printmaker, discusses the Art & Craft of Print.

Johns Hopkins University Press

After nine years in manuscript editing at JHU Press, Debby Bors explains her passion for university press publishing.

University of Chicago Press

Associate marketing manager Levi Stahl has built a community of crime fiction fans around the cult-classic mystery novels written by “Richard Stark.”

Purdue University Press

Editor Dianna Gilroy discusses the connections between her work at the press on the Human-Animal Bond series and her work in the local and global community raising awareness about the value of the human-animal bond and the need to help homeless animals.

Princeton University Press

Behind the scenes with Eric Henney, new editor of physical, earth, and computer science at Princeton University Press.

Seminary Co-op Bookstores

Former Triliteral sales rep, John Edlund shares his favorite books that he represented throughout his career with Harvard, Yale and MIT.

#ReadUP in the Community: IndieBound in Kentucky

This week, we’re celebrating University Press Week, which highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society.

This year’s #UPWeek theme is COMMUNITY, and, for us, that means honoring the people we serve through our mission to publish academic books of high scholarly merit in a variety of fields and to publish significant books about the history and culture of Kentucky, the Ohio Valley region, the Upper South, and Appalachia.

Download your own UPK #ReadUP Bookmark!

We love to publish great books by great authors, but how do we get the books on your shelf? With a little help from our indefatigable partners in publishing: independent booksellers.

It takes a lot of love and passion for books, knowledge, and community to create a great bookstore. Indie booksellers promote new authors, help readers rediscover the classics, and bond community members through events, book clubs, meeting spaces, and even a cup of coffee.

Kentucky is unique in many ways, but one of the things we love most about our state is the number of amazing, dedicated, and energetic booksellers and bookstores across the Commonwealth!

With that in mind, we approached our #Indiebound friends with a few pressing questions about their reading communities, their favorite UPK books, and their favorite karaoke songs. . . . Get to know these champions of the written word, and stop by to snag a new book to #ReadUP!

Our Bookstores and Booksellers who Contributed here:

Our thanks to everyone who contributed their time and attention to helping us with this post. For a full list of independent booksellers in Kentucky, visit Indiebound.org or the American Booksellers Association.


Poor Richard’s Books, Frankfort
with Lizz Taylor

Find Poor Richard’s Books online here: http://www.poorrichardsbooksky.com

What do you love most about your reading community?
The Frankfort reading community is eager to listen to the recommendations my staff makes for “what their next read could be.”

What is one University Press of Kentucky book (or another university press book) that you love and would recommend?

Crawfish Bottom by Doug Boyd is our top bestseller from the University Press of Kentucky titles.  This history of a local neighborhood originally right outside our front door has appeal for those who grew up here, as well as those who have heard the many colorful stories of this neighborhood.

What was the last book you read? Did you like it?
The Pearl that Broke its Shell by Nadia Nashimi.  She describes the young woman in Afghanistan trying to use education to advance their lives.  A great follow-up to Hosseini’s Kiterunner.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I would have liked to have been a doctor or detective, but I still do that type of work trying to find the books to suit my customers.

If someone asked you for a random piece of advice, what would you say?

“You have been my friend—that in itself is a tremendous thing.”—E B White from Charlotte’s Web.  I love perusing my book shelves and remembering my “old friends.”

If you could go back in history, who would you like to meet and why?

Eleanor Roosevelt for her conviction, loyalty, and strength.

What is your favorite thing to cook and why?
My favorite thing to cook is food for my bookclub, the Absent-Minded Book Club (as we can never remember who is hosting or what we decided to read.  I love attempting a recipe that will enhance our latest reading experience.

If you were a superhero, what would be your name and super power? What would you wear?
I could be Wonder-Book Woman as I must wear so many hats running Poor Richard’s Books.
My costume could be old book pages shaped to drape, but then I’d get caught up reading those old pages before I finish the costume.

What was your favorite subject in school and why?
I loved history, as the “truth is always stranger than fiction.”

What’s your favorite joke?
Not exactly a joke, but Mark Twain referenced Kentucky:  “I want to be in Kentucky when the end of the world comes, because they are always 20 years behind.”

What’s something most people don’t know about you?
I love to travel, hike and view art.

What’s something you wish everyone knew about you?
I actually like the privacy of my life out of the bookstore, where I am social all day long.

If a movie was being made about your life, who would you want to play the starring role?
I think that Meryl Streep could handle it.

Do you have any hidden talents?
I have some medical background as my mother was in nursing school when I was reading Cherry Ames nurse mysteries as a young girl.

What was your favorite band/musician as a teenager and what was your favorite song?
The Beatles—I even named my daughter Julia after that song.  I loved the french included in that piece.

Have you ever met any celebrities?
Robert Penn Warren was a real treat.  He said I could call him “Red,” when I didn’t know that he had been a redhead before his hair turned white.

Do you collect anything?
It’s hard to resist books, art and recipes.

What’s your favorite karaoke go-to song and why?
Music is in my head whenever I’m in a good mood.  But the selection varies from day to day.

If you could live in any TV show, what would it be and why?
A science fiction show like Star Wars, or Star Trek would be an incredible adventure.

Name three things you can’t live without.
Books, color and peace!

If you could bring any fictional character to life, who would you choose?
Jane Austen is a favorite, as she responds to her world and admits her prejudices.

If your shop had a mascot/spirit animal, what would it be and why?
A curious cat could work if folks didn’t have allergies.

If your shop were a world city, where would it be and why?
We would be located in the middle of Diagon Alley in Harry Potter world.  How much fun to explore all the unique shops!

If you could host a book club with any author alive or dead, who would it be and why?
Jane Austen for the reason previously stated.

If your shop were a food, what would it be and why?
Definitely comfort food..maybe as satisfying as apple pie.


Joseph-Beth Booksellers, Crestview Hills
with Caitlin Fletcher

Find Joseph-Beth Booksellers online here: www.josephbeth.com

jb-crestviewWhat do you love most about your reading community?
I love how enthusiastic they are! There’s a preconceived notion that nobody reads anymore and I find that to be entirely false. People love their books, they love reading, and they love that anticipation of waiting for a new book. We get customers coming in asking for books that they’ve been waiting for years for. It’s beautiful.
What is one University Press of Kentucky book (or another university press book) that you love and would recommend?
I absolutely adored The Birds of Opulence by Crystal Wilkinson. It was full of rich characters and a plot that makes you want to never put down the book. Crystal was at our store for a signing when the book came out and she was so passionate about the book that it was hard to not enjoy it – so much love, thought, and imagination went into this book.
What was the last book you read? Did you like it?
The Truth of Right Now by Kara Lee Corthron. It’s beautiful. Diverse, interesting, and realistic. I loved it.
What’s your favorite karaoke go-to song and why?
Anything by Taylor Swift – usually “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together.” Because no one sounds good singing that song and I love Taylor Swift.
If you could live in any TV show, what would it be and why?
Gilmore Girls, probably. It’s quick, witty, and I would love to be best friends with Lorelai and Rory.
Name three things you can’t live without.
Books, laptop, and heat. Or food. Or my cat. This is a tough one.
If you could bring any fictional character to life, who would you choose?
Hermione Granger.
If your shop had a mascot/spirit animal, what would it be and why?
A quokka. They’re friendly, always smiling, and they’re helpful. Plus they’re really adorable.
If your shop were a world city, where would it be and why?
I couldn’t see us anywhere else except for the Cincinnati area. It’s our home!
If you could host a book club with any author alive or dead, who would it be and why?
Wow. I don’t know if I could choose just one. Stephen King is in my top list of favorite authors, so perhaps him. Or JK Rowling. Or Natalie Babbitt. There are so many.
If your shop were a food, what would it be and why?
Something tasty. Like a cinnamon roll – because it’s sweet and comforting.
What is your favorite thing to cook and why?
I’m not very good at cooking, but I enjoy baking. I love baking brownies, which sounds incredibly simple; but for me it’s quite an achievement!
If you were a superhero, what would be your name and super power? What would you wear?
Hydro and my super power would be manipulation of water. As for what I would wear, probably something practical without a cape.
What was your favorite subject in school and why?
English. Words have always come easily to me and reading has always been an escape for me.
When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I went through the phases: I wanted to be a doctor, then a social worker, then a rockstar, but in the end . . . I realized I wanted to write and since then, that’s all I’ve ever wanted.
If someone asked you for a random piece of advice, what would you say?
Other peoples’ opinions of you does not define who you are.
If you could go back in history, who would you like to meet and why?
Maybe Harper Lee. To Kill a Mockingbird continues to be one of my favorite books and I would have loved to talk to her about writing.
What’s your favorite joke?
“Have you heard the cookie joke? You wouldn’t like it. It’s pretty crumby!”
What’s something most people don’t know about you?
I’ve never completely finished writing a novel. I start a lot, but never finish them.
What’s something you wish everyone knew about you?
I’m terrified of heights. If they knew, perhaps they’d stop asking me to climb tall things!
If a movie was being made about your life, who would you want to play the starring role?
I don’t really know . . . I feel like I’m too weird for someone to portray. Maybe Anna Kendrick. She’s got the quirky weird thing down.
Do you have any hidden talents?
I can roll my tongue. I don’t think that constitutes as a hidden talent. But it’s the only thing I can think of.
What was your favorite band/musician as a teenager and what was your favorite song?
Nirvana. They still are, actually. My favorite song by them is “Heart Shaped Box.”
Have you ever met any celebrities?
Not any big ones. I’ve met a few authors because of work and I met this singer from Canada that I’ve been a fan of for going on ten years now, but no one incredibly big.
Do you collect anything?
Editions of Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt. It’s my favorite book of all time.

Wild Fig Books & Coffee, Lexington
with Crystal Wilkinson and Ron Davis

Find Wild Fig Books & Coffee online here: http://wildfigbooks.net

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William DeShazer for the New York Times

Learn more about Crystal, Ron, and Wild Fig Books & Coffee in this recent piece from the New York Times on neighborhood bookstores!

What do you love most about your reading community?
we love their enthusiasm for good books and emerging writers.

What is one University Press of Kentucky book (or another university press book) that you love and would recommend?
the man who loved birds with UPofKy

What was the last book you read? Did you like it?
the graphic novel, Beautiful Darkness. it was wonderful!

If you could go back in history, who would you like to meet and why?
ron – the first african to see a slave ship off the west coast so he could warn him to the coming danger and to take appropriate action against them.
crystal – ida b. wells because she remains an inspiration.

What’s something most people don’t know about you?
we’re both introverts.

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Follow the adventures of the Wild Fig “Barista Barbie” on Instagram!

If a movie was being made about your life, who would you want to play the starring role?
sam jackson as both of us.

Do you have any hidden talents?
crys – trapeze artist
ron – trained assassin for the nigerian secret service.

What was your favorite band/musician as a teenager and what was your favorite song?crystal – prince, starfish and coffee
ron – funkadelic, maggot brain

Name three things you can’t live without.
tv remote… a car… werther’s originals.

If you could bring any fictional character to life, who would you choose?
luke cage and spongebob because they would be awesome together.

If your shop had a mascot/spirit animal, what would it be and why?
luke cage and spongebob (see above)

If your shop were a world city, where would it be and why?
luanda, angola because it is so lovely.

What is your favorite thing to cook and why?
waffles. because… “waffles”.

What was your favorite subject in school and why?
art for ron because he paints.
english for crystal because she writes.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?
ron wanted to be an architect.
crystal wanted to be a journalist.

If someone asked you for a random piece of advice, what would you say?
dont be poor.

Have you ever met any celebrities?
crys – bell hooks
ron – haki madhubuti

Do you collect anything?
african sculptures.

What’s your favorite karaoke go-to song and why?
crystal – starfish and coffee, because she loves prince
ron – black steel in the hour of chaos because he’s a public enemy fan.

If you could live in any TV show, what would it be and why?
the 100. because we could build a life in the hills.

If you could host a book club with any author alive or dead, who would it be and why?
tie among gayl jones, toni morrison, and james baldwin because they are all great writers with excellent social insights.

If your shop were a food, what would it be and why?
avocado toast because we make a great one at the store!


Joseph-Beth Booksellers, Lexington
with Kelly Morton

Find Joseph-Beth Booksellers online here: www.josephbeth.com

What do you love most about your reading community?
The diversity and enthusiasm!

What is one University Press of Kentucky book (or another university press book) that you love and would recommend? 
The Birds of Opulence by Crystal Wilkinson. Plus anything about bourbon.

If you could bring any fictional character to life, who would you choose? 
The Lorax. Someone needs to speak for the trees.

If your shop had a mascot/spirit animal, what would it be and why? 
We kinda do – he’s a plastic dinosaur named Bob. No idea why.

If someone asked you for a random piece of advice, what would you say?
Listen carefully to everything I say, then completely ignore it and go with your gut.

If you could go back in history, who would you like to meet and why? 
My grandfather while he was fighting in Germany during WWII; he died before I was born and it would be amazing to meet him and tell him what his service in Germany would lead to.

What’s your favorite joke? 
Two cows in a field. One cow says to the other, “Are you worried about that mad cow disease?” Other cow says, “No, I’m a helicopter.” ZING!!

Do you have any hidden talents? 
Nope. Both of them are pretty obvious.

What was your favorite band/musician as a teenager and what was your favorite song? 
Anything by Destiny’s Child. Also the VeggieTales theme song. I was a strange teenager.

Have you ever met any celebrities? 
Yes – if anyone asks, Jason Segel is like, the nicest guy ever.

What is your favorite thing to cook and why? 
Pie because even if you mess it up, it’s still delicious.

If you were a superhero, what would be your name and super power? What would you wear?
I don’t have a clever name, but I’d be able to breathe underwater and talk to sea creatures. I’d wear scales and seaweed – I’m beginning to think I’m just a mermaid.

What was your favorite subject in school and why? 
Lunch because food. But also art because that’s a different kind of sustenance. And English because I loved reading.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? 
I never really decided. I still haven’t. The nice thing about books is that you can become anyone you want in the pages.

What’s something most people don’t know about you? 
I’m an introvert. 

What’s something you wish everyone knew about you? 
I’m an introvert. Seriously. Let me go hide.

If a movie was being made about your life, who would you want to play the starring role?
Someone completely unknown so they could get their big break!

Do you collect anything? 
Elephants, Harry Potter books, and scars, but the last one isn’t intentional.

What’s your favorite karaoke go-to song and why? 
Santeria” by Sublime because I know all the words.

If you could live in any TV show, what would it be and why? 
Bob’s Burgers because I’m pretty sure Gene is my spirit animal and I think I’d fit in.

Name three things you can’t live without. 
Espresso, cute dresses, and my wiener dog.

If your shop were a world city, where would it be and why? 
Cincinnati should count as a world city! Because we’re big enough but not too big, friendly but not overbearing, and we’re obsessed with buckeyes.

If you could host a book club with any author alive or dead, who would it be and why? 
Barbara Kingsolver because I bet she’d bring all sorts of treats to share.

If your shop were a food, what would it be and why? 
A really, really big just-baked cookie because we’re warm and friendly.

What was the last book you read? Did you like it? 
The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead. Yes, in a my-heart-is-crushed-and-I’m-dying-but-ok-with-it kind of way.

#ReadUP in Your Community: Day 1

carter_proclamation_smIn the summer of 1978 President Jimmy Carter proclaimed a University Press Week “in recognition of the impact, both here and abroad, of American university presses on culture and scholarship.”

That influence continues today, as does the increasing vitality of university press publishing programs, the many ways and means by which works are now produced and distributed, and the urgent need for articulate discourse in times pervaded by sound bites. Today, a renewed University Press Week highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society.

This year’s #UPWeek theme is COMMUNITY—honoring the people we serve through our mission to publish academic books of high scholarly merit in a variety of fields and to publish significant books about the history and culture of Kentucky, the Ohio Valley region, the Upper South, and Appalachia.

Download your own UPK #ReadUP Bookmark!

 

The University Press Community as a whole has collected their works that best exemplify this year’s theme in a gallery where you can find a great new read (click below):

Screen Shot 2016-11-14 at 9.26.15 AM.png

You can also explore other University Press’s efforts to empower and inform their communities via our yearly blog tour. Today’s posts highlight the people in our neighborhoods, read more on their blogs:

Northwestern University Press

http://northwesternup.tumblr.com/

Rutgers Unviersity Press

Sneak a peek at Rutgers’ 250th anniversary celebrations and the press’s role in them (with lots of pictures!)

Fordham University Press

Featuring Professor Mark Naison, co-author of Before the Fires: An Oral History of African American Life in the Bronx from the 1930s to the 1960s.

University of Toronto Press

Our history editor recounts her experiences running lectures at a nearby Jewish Community Centre in Toronto on Why History Matters Today, featuring a string of our higher education authors.

University of Toronto Press Journals

Featuring one of our journal editors and the work they are doing in their own communities related to the journal they are responsible for.

Seminary Co-op Bookstores

Curated book list of favorite University Press titles from Haun Saussy, University of Chicago faculty and Columbia University Press and Fordham University Press author.

Athabasca University Press

We will be featuring members of our editorial committee.

University Press of Florida

An introduction to our “neighborhood” of readers, authors, bookstores, sales reps, staff, and more.

 

 

 

His Life on the Blacklist, or How Communists Brought Us the “Cran-stache” #UPWeek

Fans of the hit television show Breaking Bad have grown accustomed to seeing Bryan Cranston donning a mustache to play Walter White. But, at this year’s Emmy Awards, the “Cran-stache” came out for a different reason. . .

Cran-stache

. . . for his starring role as blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo in the forthcoming film Trumbo, directed by Jay Roach. The new mustache was perhaps just as memorable as Cranston’s Emmys makeout session with Best Actress-winner Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

Trumbo made a name for himself as a screenwriter, playwright, and author, but he is also remembered as one of the Hollywood Ten who opposed the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). Refusing to answer questions about his prior involvement with the Communist Party, Trumbo sacrificed a successful career in Hollywood to stand up for his rights and defend political freedom.

Roach’s screenplay for Trumbo is based on the book Dalton Trumbo by Bruce Cook. Cook’s 1976 biography was largely based on a series of interviews with Trumbo himself, in which Cook admitted he was too “embarrassed” to ask the writer about his Communist Party affiliations.

Dalton Trumbo BookForthcoming in January 2015Dalton Trumbo: Blacklisted Hollywood Radical, builds on Cook’s previous work through extensive research by Trumbo’s son, Christopher, and coauthor Larry Ceplair, primarily through the reams of carefully-worded letters Trumbo wrote throughout his life. Trumbo wrote thousands of letters that served as a journal of sorts, keeping track of the important events and people in his life and the battles he fought.

According to Christopher Trumbo, “That he was writing humorous and graceful letters at the same time as he was handling all that other stuff gave the audience a larger picture of what he was like.”

With regard to all “that other stuff,” Trumbo’s political beliefs continually evolved. He joined (and later left) the Communist Party twice in his life. But, in the anti-Communist boiler that was mid-century Hollywood, Trumbo’s membership in the party told them all they need to know about his politics. In a cover letter that accompanied several dozen boxes of his papers sent to the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research in 1962, Trumbo wrote:

I’ve always thought of my life as a series of conflicts, each a separate battle, segregated in my mind under the heading, “My fight with these guys” or “My fight with those guys.” In thinking back I now realize I have regarded each fight as distinct and unrelated to the other, and have sometimes marveled how one man could have so many of them. I now realize it was all one fight; that the relation of each to the other was very close; and I am really no more combative than any other man. It just happened in my case that the original fight once undertaken, expanded marvelously into what seemed like many fights and the most recent in a sequence of fights is actually no more than the current phase of the primary engagement.

The blacklist ended for Trumbo in 1960, when he received screen credits for Exodus and Spartacus. Just before his death, he received a long-delayed Academy Award for The Brave One, and in 1993, he was posthumously given an Academy Award for Roman Holiday (1953).

And as for Bryan Cranston’s faithful display of facial hair for the upcoming biopic?

From the introduction:

He almost always wore a mustache. . . . He periodically changed the shape and style of his mustache, going from a pencil-thin one in the 1930s to one that was bushier, carefully shaped, and, of course, whiter. He was very fastidious about his mustache. “He shaved every morning,” Mitzi [his daughter] said, “and he had a little comb for his mustache. Once, he became annoyed that nobody had noticed a change he had made in his facial hair.”

Dalton Trumbo Writing

Dalton Trumbo writing in his bath tub. Photo by Mitzi Trumbo.

Bryan Cranston Dalton Trumbo Mustache

Bryan Cranston at the 2014 Emmy Awards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See what’s happening for #UPWeek from other #AAUP Member Presses:

  • Princeton University Press on their book Alan Turing: The Enigma and the new, highly-acclaimed movie tie-in starring Benedict Cumberbatch.
  • Georgetown University Press has built an impressive list of espionage titles. You may have noticed quite a few spy thrillers (TurnSleepy HollowThe Assests) on your DVR of late.
  • The University Press of Mississippi highlights their book, Walt Before Mickey. Now a major motion picture opening Thanksgiving weekend.
  • University Press of Wisconsin‘s blog is Ripped from the Headlines! Featuring timely, newsbreaking titles.
  • University of Pennsylvania Press features some of their books that appeal to a general audience. But they’re also trying to find ways to speed up the publishing process and release books that address topical issues as they are happening. University Presses aren’t simply places where dry tomes on minutiae get into print; they are places where all the world’s knowledge finds a voice.

Ready, Set, Go: University Press Week 2014

It’s that time of the year again!

The University Press of Kentucky will be celebrating the third annual University Press Week along with our friends at more than 120 other member presses of the American Association of University Presses. This week we’ll be rounding up the news and accomplishments of university presses across the country (and the world), and sharing more of what makes university presses so special.

What is University Press Week exactly? We’re glad you asked. The AAUP breaks it down this way:

In the summer of 1978 President Jimmy Carter proclaimed a University Press Week “in recognition of the impact, both here and abroad, of American university presses on culture and scholarship.” That influence continues today, as does the increasing vitality of university press publishing programs, the many ways and means by which works are now produced and distributed, and the urgent need for articulate discourse in times pervaded by sound bites. Today, a renewed University Press Week highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society.

upw-poster-2014We hope you discover more about us, about university presses as a whole, and some of the great books and people that make our jobs so wonderful. As always, we love to hear from you too! Feel free to leave us a comment here, on Facebook, or chat with us on Twitter (#upweek) if you want to learn more about our unique and influential community.

Additionally, 32 university press blogs (including our own!) have joined together to highlight our history, our books, our staffs, and our specialties. Individual presses will blog on a different theme each day, including Collaboration, Your University Press in Pictures, University Press in Popular Culture, Throwback Thursday, and Follow Friday. Click here for the full blog tour schedule.

Today’s Theme: Collaboration

University of California Press: Featured authors Dr. Paul Farmer and Dr. Jim Yong Kim discuss the collaborative work they are doing to fight the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

University of Chicago Press: A post on the first year of the Turabian Teacher Collaborative, featuring guest content from one of the University of Iowa professors helming the endeavor

Duke University Press: Author Eben Kirksey on collaboration at the intersection of anthropology and biology, including his own recent collection, “The Multispecies Salon.”

University of Georgia Press: A look at the New Georgia Encyclopedia (NGE) partnership, which includes the Georgia Humanities Council, UGA libraries, GALILEO, and the Press. The NGE is the
state’s award-winning, on-line only, multi-media reference work on the people, places, events, and institutions of Georgia.

Project MUSE/Johns Hopkins University Press: Project MUSE is the poster child for collaboration in the university press world, resulting from collaboration between a university press and university library. A rumination on collaboration in the university press world in general, drawing on specific instances of collaboration among university presses from MUSE’s history.

McGill-Queen’s University Press: An elaboration on the title submitted for the online gallery: Landscape Architecture in Canada — a major national project with support from scholars across the country and published simultaneously in French and English by two University Presses. Followed by cross-Canada book tour, “CONVERSATIONS”, in partnership with the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects.

Texas A&M University Press: A post focusing on a new consumer advocacy series launched earlier this year with the Texas A&M School of Public Health, whose mission is to improve the health of communities through education, research, service, outreach, and creative partnerships.

University of Virginia Press: An account of a collaboration between the Press and the Presidential Recordings Project at the Miller Center to create ‘Chasing Shadows,’ a book on the orgins of Watergate, with a special ebook and web site allowing readers to listen to the actual Oval Office conversations.

Yale University Press: Mark Polizzotti, director of the publications program at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, will contribute a guest post to our ‘Museum Quality Books’ series. The series consists of guest posts from the knowledgeable, erudite, witty, insightful, and altogether delightful directors of publishing at the museums and galleries with whom we collaborate on books.

Stay tuned for tomorrow’s theme: Your University Press in Pictures. See you then!

#UPWeek Day 2: The Future of Scholarly Communication

DAY2

 We made it to Day 2 of University Press Week! A big thanks to everyone who’s been sharing, tweeting, and learning with us. Today’s theme (you may have surmised) is the future of scholarly communication. If you read the article we shared from The Economist yesterday, you know that there has been and continues to be LOTS of change in scholarly publishing (and trade publishing for that matter too).

Today’s blog tour looks a bit more in depth at some of the challenges of our changing publishing landscape, but also highlights some of the amazing new initiatives, partnerships, and strategies University Presses are capitalizing on for the future.

  • Over at Harvard University Press, Jeffrey Schnapp, faculty director of metaLAB (at) Harvard and editor of the new metaLABprojects book series, talks about the experimental scholarship that drives the metaLAB series. http://harvardpress.typepad.com/
  • In California, Alan Harvey, Press Director at Stanford University Press, discusses the challenges presented by new technologies in publishing, and how the industry model is adapting to new reading-consumption habits. http://stanfordpress.typepad.com
  • Historian Holly Shulman, editor of The Dolley Madison Digital Edition and the forthcoming People of the Founding Era, published by the University of Virginia Press, looks at the need for university presses to adapt to new technologies, while acknowledging the difficulties of doing so. http://www.upress.virginia.edu/blog/
  • Robert Devens, Assistant Editor-in-Chief for the University of Texas Press, gives his take on the future of scholarly communication. http://utpressnews.blogspot.com/
  • For Duke University Press, Priscilla Wald, Professor of English and Women’s Studies at Duke University, writes on the slow future of scholarly communication. http://dukeupress.typepad.com
  • Dani Kasprzak, an editor at University of Minnesota Press, shares one of UMP’s new initiatives. http://www.uminnpressblog.com/
  • Alex Holzman at Temple University Press explores the partnerships university presses and libraries can forge as the means of communicating scholarship evolves. http://templepress.wordpress.com/