Tag Archives: Kentucky Historical Society

Author Carol Boggess Wins Book Award

KHS Award logoUniversity Press of Kentucky author Carol Boggess has been named the recipient of a 2018 Kentucky History Award given by the Kentucky Historical Society for her book, James Still: A Life. The Kentucky History Awards recognize outstanding achievements by historians, public history professionals, volunteers, business and civic leaders, communities, and historical organizations throughout the Commonwealth, promoting the history of state and local history. The awards were presented at the Kentucky History Awards Ceremony on Friday, November 9, at the Old State Capitol in Frankfort.

Boggess offers a detailed portrait of writer James Still in the definitive biography of the man known as the “dean of Appalachian literature.” Despite his notable output, including the classic novel River of Earth, and his importance as a mentor to generations of young writers, Still was extremely private, preferring a quiet existence in a century-old log house between the waters of Wolfpen Creek and Dead Mare Branch in Knott County, Kentucky. Boggess, who befriended the author in the last decade of his life, draws on correspondence, journal entries, numerous interviews with Still and his family, and extensive archival research to illuminate his somewhat mysterious personal life.

In James Still: A Life, James Still.final.inddBoggess explores every period of the author’s life, from his childhood in Alabama, through the years he spent supporting himself in various odd jobs while trying to build his literary career, to the decades he spent fostering other talents. This long-overdue biography not only offers an important perspective on the Still’s work and art but also celebrates the legacy of a man who succeeded in becoming a legend in his own lifetime. According to Lee Smith, author of Dimestore: A Writer’s Life, Boggess’s “graceful and informative biography sheds light into many shaded places and dark rooms of his long life, illuminating the sources and passions of this beloved giant of American literature, one of the greatest writers of all time.”

James Still is the seventh University Press of Kentucky publication in eight years to win a KHS award, joining Kentucky and the Great War: World War I on the Home Front by David J. Bettez; The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia by Gerard L. Smith, Karen Cotton McDaniel, and John A. Hardin; Bloody Breathitt: Politics and Violence in the Appalachian South by T.R.C. Hutton; The Kentucky Derby: How the Run for the Roses Became America’s Premier Sporting Event by James C. Nicholson; A History of Education in Kentucky by William E. Ellis; and Lessons in Likeness: Portrait Painters in Kentucky and the Ohio River Valley, 1802-1920 by Estill Curtis Pennington. James Still was previously named the winner of the 2018 Weatherford Award for Non-Fiction.

Carol Boggess is president of the Appalachian Studies Association and former English professor at Mars Hill University.

Boggess KHS award pic

KHS Executive Director Scott Alvey, Carol Boggess, and KHS Governing Board President Constance Alexander. Photo by Marvin Young.

 

Remembering the Civil War, 150 Years Ago Today

 

via The Illinois State Historical Society

via The Kentucky Historical Society

The legacy of the American Civil War (1861 – 1865) is remembered as the war that tore the U.S. apart. On April 12, 1861, Confederate commander P.G.T. Beauregard ordered open fire on Fort Sumter in South Carolina, and the war officially began. Until General Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, the Union forces of the north, and the Confederate forces of the south clashed bitterly on battlegrounds across the country. Even as one of the darker blemishes on American history, the Civil War remains a part of our legacy as a struggle that helped shape our nation as we know it.

Today we commemorate the sesquicentennial, or 150th Anniversary, of the start of the Civil War. As Kentuckians we have always had the unique designation as a border state that declared allegiance to neither the south nor the north, and our geography claims battle sites such as Perryville and Forts Henry and Donelson. Kentucky is also the birthplace of both Civil War presidents Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, Lincoln’s wife Mary Todd, U.S. Vice President and Confederate States’ Secretary of War John C. Breckinridge, and Basil Wilson Duke, who was also the brother-in-law of John Hunt Morgan (not a native Kentuckian, but who made Lexington his home).

President Lincoln recognized the strategic importance of Kentucky during the war, declaring:

“I hope to have God on my side, but I must have Kentucky.”

If Civil War history is your thing, or you’d like to celebrate the sesquicentennial by learning a little bit more, The University Press of Kentucky wants to feed your interest with books, maps, photos, and a little help from our friends.

  • The Kentucky Historical Society has lots of Civil War happenings and projects you can check out here. And links to their news and events surrounding the sesquicentennial here.
  • KET has some wonderful educational overviews of the Civil War in Kentucky, including timelines, maps, and speeches.
  • The Library of Congress was recently gifted with the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs which features ‘more than 700 ambrotype and tintype photographs [that] highlight both Union and Confederate soldiers during the American Civil War’. Spend a few minutes flipping through, the quality and detail are incredible!
Unidentified African American Union soldier with a rifle and revolver in front of painted backdrop showing weapons and   American flag at Benton Barracks, Saint Louis, Missouri. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, http://www.loc.gov
  • Though its not ENTIRELY Civil War related, The University of Louisville has an extensive collection of historic Kentucky maps, digitized for your easy perusal. Including this Civil War-era map of Louisville and its defenses.
  • University Press of Kentucky author Rusty Williams (My Old Confederate Home) maintains a blog of the same name, highlighting stories from Confederate soldiers’ homes.
  • And of course, The University Press of Kentucky has a substantial list of Civil War reading, inluding:

The Virginia at War Series

One of Morgan’s Men: Memoirs of Lieutenant John M. Porter of the Ninth Kentucky Cavalry


Kentuckians in Gray: Confederate Generals and Field Officers of the Bluegrass State


Perryville: This Grand Havoc of Battle

For more UPK Civil War Titles see below, or visit www.kentuckypress.com

Continue reading