Tag Archives: Keeneland

Meet the Press: Sara Nederhoed, Marketing Intern

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Name: Sara Nederhoed
Position: Marketing Intern
Hometown: Kalamazoo, MI

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Tell us a little bit about your position at the press.

I am a senior at UK majoring in journalism with a double minor in English and political science. I’m graduating in May 2019. As a marketing intern here at UPK, I help the marketing staff out with things like writing press releases, creating graphics, and managing the social media accounts to help promote the books UPK releases. I started here in August at the beginning of the fall 2018 semester.

What’s one of your favorite UPK titles and why?

TobyCompFOne of the titles that I have worked with a lot is Taking Shergar: Thoroughbred Racing’s Most Famous Cold Case written by Milton C. Toby. I think it is a very interesting story that grabbed my attention right away–a mystery about one of the most famous Thoroughbreds in the world being stolen in the middle of the night. The thieves wanted ransom for Shergar, but it was never paid. Shergar was never returned and his remains were never found. I wanted to learn more about it right after I read the description!

 

If someone was visiting Kentucky for the first time and you were their tour guide, where would you take them? Any specific restaurants, landmarks, etc.?

I am huge on food, so I hope my tourists are hungry. Being from Michigan, there were a lot of restaurants that I had never tried or even heard of when I came down to Lexington for school. Stop number one: Canes. I know they only have chicken tenders on the menu, but that is why I love it (and the SAUCE). Two: Local Taco. I’m not typically someone who eats tacos or anything like what Local Taco has, yet they have converted me. Southern Fried Tacos with no tomato = yum! Three: Keeneland. I have never been to a horse race before coming down here, and to me, it sets Kentucky apart. Keeneland amazes me every time I’m there.

What is your favorite word?

Ever since I was a kid, my favorite word to spell or write out has been Mississippi.

Do you have a favorite font? If so, what is it?

As a journalism major, I am very partial to the bland and boring Times New Roman. My sister, who is a graphic designer, would yell at me for that answer.

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Did you always know you wanted to intern or work in publishing? When you were a kid, did you want to do something different as an adult?

I have always loved books, but never considered publishing before this internship. Since I am graduating soon, I am trying to expand my horizons and see what careers are available for me. As a kid and even into high school, I wanted to be a doctor. Something about it has always fascinated me, but alas, I found out that hard science is not my strong suit.

Why should students be interested in their local university press?

University press books are great tools, but students may not realize they exist or be as familiar with UPs/UP books as they would with books from trade publishers. Some students may not think about where their books are coming from! There are very important books being produced by authors and university presses. Keona K. Ervin’s Gateway to Equality: Black Women and the Struggle for Economic Justice in St. Louis, a title from UPK, received the 2018 Missouri History Book Award. It’s great to see the authors and books we work with get the recognition they deserve!

Students should also be interested in UPs because UPs often offer internships and may cause them to dive into a career path they have never considered before or even thought possible (like me). Plus, UPs serve their local areas and regions from within the region, which means publishing isn’t only designated to one place or one group of people—and it means that not everyone has to move to New York in order to work in publishing! (Unless you want to move to New York, because who doesn’t at one point in their life?)

Why should students support their university press? How can students support UPs?

Students should support their local university press because the books that come out are really interesting and have a lot of educational value. For example, being from a different state, I have learned a lot from the books we have published that are written about Kentucky or even by Kentucky writers. I think celebrating the fact that there is so much Kentucky has to offer in a literary sense is a great thing to show off. Students can learn so much and still support their UP just by going to events and even reading university press books that they find interesting. I first learned about UPK when one of my professors a couple years ago scheduled for us to come in and learn more about what book publishing is about and what goes into it. It was a great learning experience that a lot of students could definitely benefit from!

What have you learned during your time here, and how will you use the skills you gained as you start a career, further your education, etc.?

I have learned so much here at UPK. It is one thing to learn how to use and develop your skills needed for a career after college, but it is another to actually get to apply them to real-life situations. Writing press releases has helped me with my writing, with which I always need practice. Creating graphics and banners using creative software like Photoshop has helped me expand my design skills in order to use that in my future career when designing promotional ads or graphics. And in this day and age, social media has become a huge part of daily life whether we like it or not, and to be able to say that I know how to promote a book, author, event, or business effectively across social media is an important skill to have.

If you could bring any fictional character to life, who would you choose?

Not necessarily a character, but more of a literary universe: Harry Potter. I got into the series a lot later than most people my age, but everything about the books intrigues me.

What was the last book you read? Would you recommend it? Why or why not?

I just finished Frances Burney’s Evelina for my 18th-century “Rise of The British Novel” class and I really enjoyed it. Some twists and turns in a typical foundling narrative fashion, but the storylines we had to follow were very interesting!

What’s your favorite song to sing at karaoke and why?

A tough one because I never seem to sing the same song twice. A big one that I always enjoy other people singing is “Friends in Low Places” by Garth Brooks. Even if you’re not a country fan, you still sing along!

 

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Q&A with Milton C. Toby, author of Taking Shergar: Thoroughbred Racing’s Most Famous Cold Case

On a cold February night in 1983, one of the most valuable Thoroughbreds in the world was stolen in Ireland by a group of armed thieves. The thieves asked for a large sum in exchange for Shergar, but the ransom was never paid. Shergar was never returned, his remains never found. In Taking Shergar: Thoroughbred Racing’s Most Famous Cold Case, Milton C. Toby investigates the mystery and the evidence surrounding it. TobyCompF

The theft of Shergar occurred nearly forty years ago. What attracted you to this story that has already been written about by many?
The ideal subject for a book is a story that people think they already know, when in reality they don’t know much about it at all. The theft of Shergar is one of those stories. Almost from the start, conventional wisdom was that the Irish Republican Army was behind the theft, but the IRA never claimed responsibility and there were neither arrests nor convictions. Taking Shergar for the first time connects the economic and political environments that kept Shergar in Ireland after his retirement to stud and later made him an ideal target for the cash-strapped IRA.

What was your favorite, if unbelievable, conspiracy theory that you came across in your research?
The most intriguing theory, one that got a bit of coverage by the Irish press in the days after Shergar was stolen, involved the death of a French bloodstock agent in Central Kentucky. Two months before Shergar was stolen, the body of Jean-Michel Gambet was found in a burning car on the side of a rural lane near Keeneland Race Course. He had been shot to death. The police concluded that Gambet’s death was a suicide, disguised to look like a murder, committed because he was deeply in debt. The jury at a coroner’s inquest, on the other hand, ruled that the death was a homicide, by parties unknown. The supposed connection to Shergar arose because in the months before his death, Gambet had been negotiating for the purchase of a horse with the Aga Khan IV, who owned and raced Shergar. According to the conspiracy theorists, Gambet had borrowed from mafia connections in New Orleans to buy the horse, but the deal fell through. When Gambet was unable to repay the loan, the mafia took revenge by killing the bloodstock agent and stealing the Aga Khan’s horse. Retired detective Drexel Neal has always refuted a connection between Gambet and Shergar, but there are tantalizing questions in the investigative file.

You have worked with and written about the Thoroughbred industry for more than forty years. What can casual racing fans and other non-experts gain from this book?
For racing aficionados already familiar with the basics, Taking Shergar expands the complicated backstory through a meticulously researched account that no one has written before. It’s more than a “horse book,” however. Readers who know little about racing will discover a compelling story about an ill-conceived and poorly executed scheme to steal one of the most valuable horses in the world and the convoluted aftermath when the plan went horribly wrong.

 

Kentucky Basketball Legends: Still Making Their Mark

Members of the 1998 Kentucky Men’s Basketball Championship team will sign Maker’s Mark annual commemorative bottles at the Keeneland Entertainment Center this Friday, April 13, at 7 a.m. Among those signing at the event will be forward guard Allen Edwards, guard Jeff Sheppard, and former UK head coach Tubby Smith, all of whom are featured in Wildcat Memories: Inside Stories from Kentucky Basketball Greats. In this book, author Doug Brunk details the cherished bond between Kentucky basketball and the citizens of the Commonwealth through first-hand accounts from some of the Wildcats’ most renowned legends.

Tickets for the Maker’s Mark signing are already sold out, but you still have a chance to get up close and personal with these champions by way of this engrossing book. Below is an excerpt of Coach Tubby Smith’s chapter from Wildcat Memories:


As a coach, you love the fans, and you want their support. Having an affinity for the fan base is essential. You are providing a service coaching their team. You are trying to win, and you are trying to do the right things for your players, your coaches, the university, and the fans. Fans may boo you or cheer you. They call and they write with praise and criticism. But you can’t let that affect you, or you’re not going to last long in coaching or be successful in coaching. I became a college coach for the student-athletes, to get them educated and to teach them the game of basketball.

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During his ten-year tenure, Tubby Smith guided UK to one national championship, five SEC Tournament titles, and six Sweet Sixteen finishes. (Courtesy of Victoria Graff.)

During my tenure at UK there was an element of the fan base that didn’t think our teams had won enough games, but in five of my ten years as coach we probably played the toughest schedule in the history of UK basketball. I wish we could have won more games while I was head coach. But we were competitive, we graduated our players, and we kept the program clean. If there was pressure, it was pressure to make sure we did things in a first-class manner. 

One thing I appreciate about UK fans is that they know how to be grateful, because the program has been so successful , and the fans are proud of that success. They show their pride, and they should. They show their commitment by calling in to talk shows, writing letters, and flocking to Rupp Arena or wherever the team plays. You’re not going to find more loyal, passionate fans for their team than followers of the Wildcats. That’s the one common thing. Just about everybody in Kentucky is pulling for you to be successful. It’s a way of life in the Commonwealth. 

Kentucky’s Irish Heritage: Burgoo

As we continue to celebrate Irish Heritage Month, take a look at this savory piece of Kentucky’s Irish heritage:

Burgoo is a hearty stew that was traditionally made with whatever meats were available, including squirrel, venison, possum, and raccoon. Luckily these days burgoo recipes stick with pork, chicken, and venison, along with a yummy combination of vegetables. Burgoo comes from the tradition of Irish stew brought by Irish immigrants to Kentucky and its surrounding states.

Check out UPK’s book The Kentucky Barbecue Book by Wes Berry for more info about burgoo and Kentucky’s rich culinary tradition, or stop by Keeneland to try some of their famous burgoo for yourself!

Here’s a great recipe for bourbon burgoo from Epicurious:

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds pork shank
  • 2 pounds veal shank
  • 2 pounds beef shank
  • 2 pounds breast of lamb
  • 1 (4-pound) chicken
  • 8 quarts cold water
  • 1 1/2 pounds potatoes
  • 1 1/2 pounds onions
  • 1 bunch carrots, peeled and sliced thickly
  • 2 green peppers, seeded and chopped
  • 2 cups chopped cabbage
  • 1 quart tomato puree
  • 2 cups whole corn, fresh or canned
  • 2 pods red pepper
  • 2 cups diced okra
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 2 cups dry lima beans
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 3/4 cup Kentucky bourbon
  • Salt and pepper
  • Tabasco
  • Steak Sauce
  • Worcestershire sauce

Preparation

1. Put the pork, veal, beef, lamb, and chicken into a large pot. Add the water and bring it to a boil slowly. Simmer until meat is tender enough to fall off the bones, about 4—6 hours.

2. Lift the meat out of the stock. Cool the meat, remove it from the bones, and chop it. Return the chopped meat to the stock.

3. Pare the potatoes and onions and dice them. Add them, plus the carrots, green peppers, cabbage, tomato puree, corn, red pepper, okra, parsley, lima beans, celery, and bourbon, to the meat and stock. Allow the stew to simmer until very thick about 6 hours.

4. Season to taste with the salt, pepper, Tabasco, steak sauce, and Worcestershire sauce.

Place Your Bets on These Horse Country Titles from UPK

If you’re anywhere near Kentucky’s Bluegrass region this time of year, you know it is Thoroughbred racing season. The Kentucky Derby may give the state big attention in the spring, but at Lexington’s Keeneland Race Track, the Fall Meet in October is just as popular—and there is hardly anything as beautiful as the region in autumn.

In honor of racing time in the Bluegrass, enjoy one of these great books about horse country:

How Kentucky Became Southern by Mary Jean WallHow Kentucky Became Southern: A Tale of Outlaws, Horse Thieves, Gamblers, and Breeders

by Maryjean Wall

The Kentucky Thoroughbred by Kent HollingsworthThe Kentucky Thoroughbred

by Kent Hollingsworth foreword by Ed Bowen

Kentucky Horse CountryKentucky Horse Country: Images of the Bluegrass

by James Archambeault

Heroes and Horses by Philip ArderyHeroes and Horses: Tales of the Bluegrass

by Philip Ardery

The Prince of Jockeys by Pellom McDaniels IIIThe Prince of Jockeys: The Life of Isaac Burns Murphy

by Pellom McDaniels III

Never Say Die by James C. NicholsonNever Say Die: A Kentucky Colt, the Epsom Derby, and the Rise of the Modern Thoroughbred Industry

by James C. Nicholson foreword by Pete Best

Keeneland's Ted Bassett: My Life  by James E. "Ted" Bassett and Bill Mooney Keeneland’s Ted Bassett: My Life

by James E. “Ted” Bassett and Bill Mooney

Bassett and Mooney win big!

Congratulations are in order for Ted Bassett and Bill Mooney who recently won the Dr. Tony Ryan Award for the UPK book: Keeneland’s Ted Bassett: My Life. The Dr. Tony Ryan Book Award is sponsored by Castleton Lyons and The Thoroughbred Times. The authors will be signing books at Keeneland this Friday.  Click here for the full article and to watch videos of the awards ceremony!