Tag Archives: Journey Through The Bluegrass

Stop Two: St. Joe’s Oak

Happy first day of fall everyone! Considering this is one of the most beautiful times of the year due to the progression of tree leaves through many vibrant colors, we decided to make a pit stop on our Journey Through the Bluegrass road trip at one of Kentucky’s most historic trees: St. Joe’s Oak.

St. Joe’s Oak has an undocumented and impressive history in the bluegrass. Today, the tree can be found inside the parking structure at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Lexington, KY, but it has presumably been here since before Lexington was even founded. When St. Joe’s was originally built, there was much talk of tearing down the amiable arbor, however, the contractors could just not bring themselves to obstruct such a beautiful and historic site. Now a monument in the center of the St. Joseph’s parking structure, this giant oak still stands proud for all to look upon. If you want to make a pit stop to gaze upon this beauty, you may find it at One Saint Joseph Drive, Lexington, KY 40504.

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A photograph of St. Joe’s Oak in front of the newly build St. Joseph’s Hospital.

If you want to learn more about St. Joe’s Oak and other venerable trees of the bluegrass, check out our recently published book, Venerable Trees: History, Biology, and Conversation in the Bluegrass by Tom Kimmerer. Featuring more than one hundred color photographs, this beautifully illustrated book offers guidelines for conserving ancient trees worldwide while educating readers about their life cycle. Venerable Trees is an informative call to understand the challenges faced by the companions so deeply rooted in the region’s heritage and a passionate plea for their preservation.

And, bonus! We are actually giving away a copy of this book in honor of it being the first day of autumn, so happy fall, y’all! If you want to sign up for our book giveaway, click here! The sign ups will be active until the end of the day on Sunday, September 27, so don’t miss out!

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Stop One: Lincoln’s Boyhood Home

Welcome back to Journey Through the Bluegrass, folks! We are super excited to get started on this virtual road trip. Our first stop begins with a specific moment in the history of our great nation. As many of you history buffs probably know, today is the 153th anniversary of the date the emancipation proclamation was enacted by our great former president, Abraham Lincoln. In honor of this monumental feat towards the equality of mankind, we decided to pay some homage to the man responsible.

One of the most well-known facts about Kentucky is that this is where Lincoln grew up. I think we’ve all heard the term “Lincoln’s Boyhood Home” a couple hundred times too many, but how many of you can actually say that you’ve visited it? There are actually two locations that can still be seen today. This first is Lincoln’s first home, a log cabin on a farm in Hardin County, Kentucky, in which the great president was born to Thomas and Nancy Lincoln on February 12, 1809. This home is still a standing structure, although may have looked closer to this image back in its prime:

To visit the birthplace unit, you can travel to this location: 2995 Lincoln Farm Road, Hodgenville, Kentucky 42748.

A couple years later, at the ripe age of two and a half, this 16th president of the United States of America was uprooted from one log cabin to the next which was located on a farm on Knob Creek. While this location is also a memorial that you can physically travel to, we would advise that you wait until the latter part of this year since the site is currently under heavy construction. Should you find that you wish to travel there, the address is 7120 Bardstown Road, Hodgenville, Kentucky 42748.

For directions to either site based upon starting locations of various large cities, please visit this website.

Additionally, if the travel bug has bitten you already, you can explore the Mary Todd Lincoln house, the family home of the Abraham Lincoln’s First Lady, which can be found in Lexington, KY. The property was the Todd family residence from 1832 to 1849. Mary Todd resided here from the ages of 13 to 21, before moving to Springfield, Illinois, to live with a sister in 1839. There she met Abraham Lincoln and they were married in November 1842. To visit this historic home, the address at which it is located is 578 West Main Street, Lexington, KY.

The Mary Todd Lincoln house as it stands today in Lexington, KY.

Have we piqued your interest in Lincoln yet? You may want to spend more time getting this know one of the greatest presidents in history. If this is the case, you should check out our recently published book about this historic president’s last moments. In Lincoln’s Final Hours, author Kathryn Canavan takes a magnifying glass to the last moments of the president’s life and to the impact his assassination had on a country still reeling from a bloody civil war. With vivid, thoroughly researched prose and a reporter’s eye for detail, this fast-paced account not only furnishes a glimpse into John Wilkes Booth’s personal and political motivations but also illuminates the stories of ordinary people whose lives were changed forever by the assassination.

For more information on this title, click here or on the picture below.

Come Take a Journey through the Bluegrass with us!

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This week, the crew here at the press is kicking off a series titled “Journey Through the Bluegrass”!! We gave you a taste of bourbon country last week, but there’s so much more to Kentucky than just bourbon, basketball, and barbecues. We’re going to be taking you on a tour through some of the Bluegrass State’s finest locations and moments in history. Here’s a sneak preview of some of the books we’ll be talking about this week:

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KENTUCKY’S LAST GREAT PLACES
Thomas G. Barnes

“This isn’t a memorial to lost places; it’s a call to action, a reminder to readers of what exactly there is to lose if economic development continues to take precedence over the environment in both social and political arenas.”

Back Home in Kentucky

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KENTUCKY’S NATURAL HERITAGE: AN ILLUSTRATED GUIDE TO BIODIVERSITY
Greg Abernathy, Deborah White, Ellis L. Laudermilk, and Mark Evans

Richly detailed and lavishly illustrated with more than 250 color photos, maps, and charts, Kentucky’s Natural Heritage is the definitive compendium of the commonwealth’s amazing diversity. It celebrates the natural beauty of some of the most important ecosystems in the nation and presents a compelling case for the necessity of conservation.

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VENERABLE TREES: HISTORY, BIOLOGY, AND COVERVATION IN THE BLUEGRASS
Tom Kimmerer

Featuring more than one hundred color photographs, this beautifully illustrated book offers guidelines for conserving ancient trees worldwide while educating readers about their life cycle. Venerable Trees is an informative call to understand the challenges faced by the companions so deeply rooted in the region’s heritage and a passionate plea for their preservation.

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One last thing! We’ve compiled the perfect playlist to accompany you on your trip this week! The playlist has been left open to the public, so if you feel like there is something missing, please add it! We would love to see what you guys are listening to on this awesome adventure!

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If you want to add something to the playlist, click here!