Tag Archives: James Still

Gentry Named Recipient of AWA Book of the Year for Poetry

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

 

Author and former Kentucky Poet Laureate Jane Gentry (1941–2014) has been named the recipient of the Appalachian Writers Association’s 2017 Appalachian Book of the Year for Poetry for her posthumous collection The New and Collected Poems of Jane Gentry, edited by Julia Johnson, professor of English and creative writing at the University of Kentucky.

Alternately startling and heart-wrenching, The New and Collected Poems of Jane Gentry offers a valuable retrospective of the celebrated poet’s work. Upon being diagnosed with cancer, Gentry and her daughters began collaborating with editor Julia Johnson to organize this definitive collection. The result is the entirety of Gentry’s published work alongside new, previously unpublished poems.

“In poem after poem in this rich and important collection, Jane Gentry commemorates her personal history through the lens of poetry — family, friends, the seasons, the flora and fauna she moves through. This book is a love song to Kentucky,” commented Jeff Worley, editor of What Comes Down to Us: 25 Contemporary Kentucky Poets.

Poet and professor Jane Gentry spoke to UK College of Arts and Sciences about her life and work in 2013.

The New and Collected Poetry of Jane Gentry is the ninth University Press of Kentucky book to win an AWA award, joining Driving the Dead: Poems by Jane Hicks and From the Mountain, From the Valley: New and Collected Poems by James Still as winner of the poetry award. In addition, Bloodroot: Reflections on Place by Appalachian Women Writers by Joyce Dyer, Songs of Life and Grace: A Memoir by Linda Scott DeRosier, My Appalachia: A Memoir by Sidney Saylor Farr, Bloody Breathitt: Politics and Violence in the Appalachian South by T.R.C. Hutton, and Helen Matthews Lewis: Living Social Justice in Appalachia by Helen Lewis all won the AWA’s Book of the Year Award for Nonfiction, and The Birds of Opulence by Crystal Wilkinson, UK associate professor of English, won for fiction.

Gentry’s work is deeply rooted in place, exuding a strong connection to the life and land of her native Kentucky. In honor of this consummate poet, who possessed an uncanny ability to spin quietly expansive and wise verses from small details, objects, and remembered moments, we are sharing one of her poignant pieces, “A Garden in Kentucky.”

A Garden in Kentucky

Under the fluorescent sun
inside the Kroger, it is always
southern California. Hard avocados
rot as they ripen from the center out.
Tomatoes granulate inside their hides.
But by the parking lot, a six-tree orchard
frames a cottage where winter has set in.

Pork fat seasons these rooms.
The wood range spits and hisses,
limbers the oilcloth on the table
where an old man and an old woman
draw the quarter-moons of their nails,
shadowed still with dirt,
across the legends of seed catalogues.

Each morning he milks the only goat
inside the limits of Versailles. She feeds
a rooster that wakes up all the neighbors.
Through dark afternoons and into night
they study the roses’ velvet mouths
and the apples’ bright skins
that crack at the first bite.

When thaw comes, the man turns up
the sod and, on its underside, ciphers
roots and worms. The sun like an angel
beats its wings above their grubbing.
Evenings on the viny porch they rock,
discussing clouds, the chance of rain.
Husks in the dark dirt fatten and burst.

 

 

Advertisements

Poetry Month in Kentucky

April marks the celebration of National Poetry Month, and in Kentucky, the poetic tradition runs strong. In recognition, we’re featuring some of our favorite collections from Kentucky Poet Laureates past and present.


From the Mountain, From the Valley: New and Collected Poems 9780813121994

James Still first achieved national recognition in the 1930s as a poet. Although he is better known today as a writer of fiction, it is his poetry that many of his essential images, such as the “mighty river of earth,” first found expression. Yet much of his poetry remains out of print or difficult to find.

From the Mountain, From the Valley collects all of Still’s poems, including several never before published, and corrects editorial mistakes that crept into previous collections. The poems are presented in chronological order, allowing the reader to trace the evolution of Still’s voice. Throughout, his language is fresh and vigorous and his insight profound. His respect for people and place never sounds sentimental or dated.

Ted Olson’s introduction recounts Still’s early literary career and explores the poetic origins of his acclaimed lyrical prose. Still himself has contributed the illuminating autobiographical essay “A Man Singing to Himself,” which will appeal to every lover of the work of Kentucky’s first Poet Laureate.


The Total Light Process: New and Selected Poems

9780813123370

Nationally acclaimed poet, photographer, filmmaker, and novelist James Baker Hall (Kentucky Poet Laureate, 2001-2002) has long been regarded as one of Kentucky’s most profound artists. Hall’s growing body of work is an essential part of Kentucky’s literary tradition, and yet his poetry in particular transcends the borders of the Commonwealth.

The Total Light Process collects poems spanning Hall’s celebrated career as well as new poems that have never before been published. The subjects of Hall’s poems range from humorous and revealing portraits of his fellow writers and friends Wendell Berry, Ed McClanahan, and Gurney Norman, to the traumatic experience of his mother’s suicide when he was eight years old, to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the tragic murder of Matthew Shepherd.


The Land We Dreamed: Poems 9780813144580

Weaving together universal themes of family, geography, and death with images of America’s frontier landscape, former Kentucky Poet Laureate (2003-2004) Joe Survant has been lauded for his ability to capture the spirit of the land and its people. Kliatt magazine has praised his work, stating, “Survant’s words sing. . . . This is storytelling at its best.”

Exploring the pre-Columbian and frontier history of the commonwealth, The Land We Dreamed is the final installment in the poet’s trilogy on rural Kentucky. The poems in the book feature several well-known figures and their stories, reimagining Dr. Thomas Walker’s naming of the Cumberland Plateau, Mary Draper Ingles’s treacherous journey from Big Bone Lick to western Virginia following her abduction by Native Americans, and Daniel Boone’s ruminations on the fall season of 1770. Survant also explores the Bluegrass from the perspectives of the chiefs of the Shawnee and Seneca tribes.

Drawing on primary documents such as the seventeenth-century reports of French Jesuit missionaries, excerpts from the Draper manuscripts, and the journals of pioneers George Croghan and Christopher Gist, this collection surveys a broad and under-recorded history. Poem by poem, Survant takes readers on an imaginative expedition—through unspoiled Shawnee cornfields, down the wild Ohio River, and into the depths of the region’s ancient coal seams.


The New and Collected Poems of Jane Gentry

9780813174075
A consummate poet, Jane Gentry (1941–2014) possessed an uncanny ability to spin quietly expansive and wise verses from small details, objects, and remembered moments. Her poetry is deeply rooted in place, exuding a strong connection to the life and land of her native Kentucky. Gentry was also a beloved and influential teacher, as well as serving as Kentucky Poet Laureate from 2007-2008. She served as a mentor to generations of young writers and worked tirelessly to promote new voices.

Gentry and her daughters collaborated with editor Julia Johnson to organize this definitive collection. The result is an important assembly of Gentry’s most celebrated poems alongside new, previously unpublished works. Johnson uses Gentry’s own methodology to organize the book, showcasing the range of the poet’s work an
d the flexibility of her style—sometimes ironic and humorous; sometimes poignant; but always clear, intelligent, and revelatory.

This volume includes two previously published full-length collections of poetry in their entirety—A Garden in Kentucky and Portrait of the Artist as a White Pig. The final section includes Gentry’s unpublished work, from verses written for loved ones to a large group of recent poems that may have been intended for future collections. Alternately startling and heart-wrenching, The New and Collected Poetry of Jane Gentry offers a valuable retrospective of the celebrated poet’s work.


Winter Come: The Ascension of York Walkerjktcomprev3.indd

In the sequel to his award-winning Buffalo Dance, Frank X Walker (Kentucky Poet Laureate, 2013-2015) reimagines Lewis and Clark’s legendary exploration of the American West. Grounded in the history of the famous trip, Walker’s vibrant account allows York—little more than a forgotten footnote in traditional narratives—to embody the full range of human ability, knowledge, emotion, and experience. Knowledge of the seasons unfolds to York “like a book,” and he “can read moss, sunsets, the moon, and a mare’s foaling time with a touch.” During the journey, York forges a spiritual connection and shares sensual delights with a Nez Perce woman, and Walker’s poems capture the profound feelings of love and loss on each side of this ill-fated meeting of souls. As the perspectives of Lewis, Clark, Sacagawea, and others in the party emerge, Walker also gives voice to York’s knife, his hunting shirt, and the river waters that have borne thousands of travelers before and after the Lewis and Clark expedition. The alternately heartbreaking and uplifting poems in When Winter Come are told from multiple perspectives and rendered in vivid detail. When Winter Come exalts the historical persona of a slave and lifts the soul of a man; York ascends out of his chains, out of oblivion, and into flight.


LyonManyFinal2.inddMany-Storied House: Poems

“The speaker in George Ella Lyon’s smoldering poem, “What Won’t Burn” – in her smoldering new book of poems, Many-Storied House – declares: “I didn’t know / they outlasted / conflagration / like the diary’s / charred metal lock.” Indeed this book, rooted as it is in the reliquary of memory, and the power of words to raise the dead, and absolve the living, is determined to outlast fire. This volume is itself storied, assembled with an architect’s acumen; yet the true craft is commemoration, and the tool is the poet’s heart. Each room, each curio, each haunted nail and joist is catalogued, named, and invested with chiseled language. This house is Lyon’s muse. Within it, she commingles ethnography, archeology and catechism. Many-Storied House is a heartbreaking, yet triumphant, inventory of acquisition, loss, the sacramental offices of love, the vanished beloved, and their shades that forever walk the rooms of recollection.” –Joseph Bathanti, North Carolina Poet Laureate

Gems of the Backlist: ‘The Appalachian Photographs of Earl Palmer’

Here at the University Press of Kentucky, we recently completed an initiative to digitize all of the books that we’ve published since our founding in 1943. It was a lot of work going through more than 1300 books, but it’s been a process full of fun surprises and astounding discoveries. Best of all, every now and then, there was a book that we just couldn’t put down—a book so good we just can’t resist sharing it with you again:

9780813149301

“Palmer has given us the best view we will ever have of life and work in the Southern Appalachians. . . . His magnificent collection of photographs preserves the old way of life for us to study and ponder.”—Harry Caudill, author of Night Comes to the Cumberlands

For more than fifty years, mountain-born Earl Palmer traveled the Southern Appalachians with his camera, recording his personal vision of the mountain people and their heritage. Over these year he created, in several thousand photographs, a distinctive body of work that affirms a traditional image of Appalachia—a region of great natural beauty inhabited by a self-sufficient people whose lives are notable for simplicity and harmony.

 The Appalachian Photographs of Earl Palmer collects more than 120 representative photographs from the photographer’s collection. Jean Haskell Speer, who was emerita director of the Appalachian Studies Program at Virginia Tech, conducted extensive interviews with Palmer to write a biographical and critical commentary. Palmer’s photographs, Speer argues, are significant cultural statements that depict not so much a geographical region as a particular idea of Appalachia.

from the preface by Jean Haskell Speer:

“Earl has spent a lifetime, as he puts it, “conjuring” Appalachia, creating a rich and complex Appalachian vision in pictures. He believes the highest and best vision of Appalachia is rooted in its past, made manifest in its traditional culture and in those persons who remain emblems of the past in the present. In fact, Earl’s photographs may be said to constitute a kind of mountain manifesto, a public declaration of his intention to create a particular Appalachian world.

Earl has photographed Appalachia according to his world view. He has seen the mountaineer as both historically real and eternally mythic. He has made a photographic record of what has been real, if now only remembered, and he has created a vision of Appalachia’s past as he wishes it to be remembered. Earl has understood the power of the photographic image to preserve and to persuade, especially to build a rhetorically powerful argument through repeated and consistent images.

The photographs chosen for this volume from Earl’s collection of twenty to thirty thousand negatives represent the mainstream of his work. They include some of his most critically acclaimed and popular photographs, some historically and culturally valuable photographs, and photographs that illustrate Earl’s concept of “Appalachianness.” The photographs were made over a period of more than fifty years from 1936 to 1988. Geographically, they represent the heartland of Southern Appalachia, covering portions of Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina. . . .

For most of his photographs Earl writes extensive captions that are intended to be evocative more often than informational. They are narratives that mix historical fact with Earl’s imagination in short vignettes about mountain life.”

We’ve selected a few photos to share here, but many more await in The Appalachian Photographs of Earl Palmer.

click the images to view full-size.

At Year’s End

LyonCvrCompFinal2.inddIt’s the darkest time of year when the days are longest;  and, more and more, all of us here at the University Press of Kentucky are finding ourselves curled up with a book of an evening.

Perusing A Kentucky Christmas, our Marketing and Sales Director (Amy) was struck again by the late, great James Still’s classic poem “At Year’s End.” Even after twenty years, something about this poem speaks to us during this season. Here it is just as it appears in A Kentucky Christmas with Still’s own special inscription:

At_Years_End

Happy Birthday James Still!

On what would be the 107th birthday of the Dean of Appalachian Literature, we present our favorite titles by Mr. Still and a few other tidbits to remember a great American writer.

View all titles by James Still at the University Press of Kentucky

View a documentary from Western Kentucky University and WKYUJames Still: Man on Troublesome Creek

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Take this opportunity to explore a glossary of regional dialect and terms used in Mr. Still’s works

Compiled by Tiffany Williams of McRoberts, KY for The Hills Remember: The Complete Short Stories of James Still edited by Ted Olson

Some of our favorite words:

Big Thick: noun An unabridged dictionary. “My old teacher used to say that once a body breathed chalk dust and pounded the Big Thick Dictionary he was spoiled for common labor.” (pg. 285). (POM)

fat mouth: noun One who talks too much or blabbers. “I might do ’er, fat mouth.” (pg. 355). (DARE)

grands and greats: noun One’s descendants; thus, a profusion of people. “It would take Adam’s grands and greats to rid that ground in time for planting.” (pg. 231).

light a shuck: verb phrase To run fast, leave in a hurry. “I whistled up Trigger and lit a shuck down the road.” (pg. 179). (DSME)

piddle: verb To deal or work in trifling or petty ways; to act idly or inefficiently; to loiter. “Bot was company for Uncle Mize, with me in the fields trying to conquer weeds, and Broadus and Kell piddling.” (pg. 84). (MW) Hence piddling, adjective Trifling, insignificant, paltry. “A mighty piddling few.” (pg. 162). (DSME)

sheep’s eyes: noun Presumably, the bubbles that form on the surface of a liquid that are comparable in size to a sheep’s eyes and indicate that the liquid is at a boil. “Stir till it ’gins making sheep’s eyes, and mind not to over-bile.” (pg. 247).

Giveaway Countdown: Six Fascinating Facts about the Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame Inductees

This week, we’re giving away a book by one of the Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame finalists. Respond by Wednesday, January 30 at 1:00 pm for your chance to win!

The six inaugural Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame inductees were responsible for some amazing “firsts” and accomplishments. For instance, did you know . . .

1) William Wells Brown’s Clotel is considered the first novel written by an African American.

2) Elizabeth Madox Roberts’s frail health kept her from college until 1917 when, at age 36, she enrolled at the University of Chicago. There, her colleagues recognized her original genius and helped her launch a late-blooming but productive literary career which included her acclaimed novel The Time of Man.

3) Robert Penn Warren is the only person to have ever won Pulitzer Prizes for both fiction (All the King’s Men) and poetry (Promises and Now and Then).

4) Harry M. Caudill’s masterpiece, Night Comes to the Cumberlands, prompted President John F. Kennedy to appoint the Appalachian Regional Commission and led to the investment of more than 15 billion dollars in aid in the region over twenty-five years.

5) Harriette Simpson Arnow’s novel Hunter’s Horn finished close to James Gould Cozzens’s Guard of Honor in the voting for the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Joyce Carol Oates has called the book “our most unpretentious American masterpiece.”

6) James Still, author of River of Earth, is the only inaugural member of the Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame not to have been born in Kentucky, but he lived in the state longer than any of the other inductees.

See more interesting facts about the inductees on our influence map, which visualizes the global reach and impact of these great Kentucky writers, and don’t forget to register for our giveaway.

Mapping the Reach of Kentucky Writers (Don’t Miss our Giveaway)

This week, we’re giving away a book by one of the Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame finalists. Respond by Wednesday, January 30 at 1:00 pm for your chance to win!

Last week, the Carnegie Center in Lexington announced the six inaugural inductees to the Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame: Harriette Simpson Arnow, William Wells Brown, Harry Caudill, Elizabeth Madox Roberts, James Still, and Robert Penn Warren.

As part of our celebration, we’ve created a map to visualize the global reach and impact of the inaugural inductees—featuring titles from the University Press of Kentucky as well as our friends at Louisiana State University Press, Michigan State University Press, the Jesse Stuart Foundation, and universities and libraries across the country.