Tag Archives: Foodways

Recipes from Bourbon Country

Celebrate Wellness Wednesday with three recipes from Chef Albert W. A. Schmid’s newest cookbook Burgoo, Barbecue and Bourbon: A Kentucky Culinary Trinity9780813169880

In this new book, Award-winning author and chef Albert W. A. Schmid serves up a feast for readers, sharing recipes and lore surrounding these storied culinary traditions. He introduces readers to new and forgotten versions of favorite regional dishes from the time of Daniel Boone to today and uncovers many lost recipes, such as Mush Biscuits, Half Moon Fried Pies, and the Original Kentucky Whiskey Cake. Featuring cuisine from the early American frontier to the present day, this entertaining book is filled with fascinating tidbits and innovative recipes for the modern cook.

Today’s recipes come from the section of dishes made to pair with the book’s central meal of burgoo, although they would be well suited to any meal.


Chicken Barbecued in a Brown Paper Bag

4 servings

3 tablespoons catsup

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

2 tablespoons butter

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

2 tablespoons vinegar

3 tablespoons brown sugar

1 teaspoon dry mustard

4 tablespoons water

1 teaspoon chili powder

1 teaspoon paprika

1 chicken, cut in pieces

Preheat oven to 500 degrees F. Combine the sauce ingredients. Grease the inside of a heavy paper grocery bag and place it inside a roaster pan. Salt and pepper the chicken pieces, dip each in the sauce, and place in the bag. Pour the remaining sauce over them in the bag. Close the bag with a double fold and secure with a medal clip. Bake uncovered for 50 minutes, then cover the pan and roast for 15 minutes longer. Serve extra sauce in a separate bowl.


Angel Biscuits

Makes 6 dozen

5 cups all-purpose flour

¾ cups vegetable shortening

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

3 teaspoons baking poweder

3 tablespoons sugar

1 yeast cake (1 packet of yeast) dissolved in ½ cup lukewarm water

2 cups buttermilk

Sift dry ingredients together; cut in shortening until mixed thoroughly. add buttermilk and dissolved yeast. Work together with a large spoon until the flour mixture is completely moistened. Cover and put in the refrigerator until ready to use.

When ready, preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Take out as much batter as needed; roll it onto a floured board to 1⁄2-inch thickness and cut into rounds or squares. Bake on a greased cookie sheet or in a round 8-inch or 9-inch cake pan for 12 minutes, or until brown.


Half Moon Fried Pies

Makes 16 miniature pies

1 pound dried apples or peaches

¾ cup sugar

2 tablespoons butter or margarine

2 teaspoons cinnamon (to taste)

piecrust

lard

additional sugar

Cover the dried fruit in water and soak overnight. Drain the fruit, add a small amount of fresh water, and cook slowly until tender. Mash the fruit. add the sugar, butter or margarine, and cinnamon. Stir well and let the mixture cool.

Make your favorite piecrust, using only half the regular amount of shortening. Cut into circles 4–6 inches in diameter. Place a generous tablespoon of the fruit filling on one side of each circle. Fold the other side over and seal firmly along the edge with your fingertips or a fork. Fry in about 1⁄2 inch of hot lard, turning once. When the pastry is browned, remove and drain on paper towels. While the pies are still warm, sprinkle them lightly with sugar.

Alternatively, bake the pies at 400 degree F. for about 30 minutes; brush the top with melted butter before baking in order to make the surface crisp.


For the stories behind these recipes and many more, preorder the book here.

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‘Cue Cards: A Guide for Father’s Day

Father’s Day is approaching, and you know what that means . . . Time to find the perfect place to take Dad for dinner.

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The first step to becoming a BBQ aficionado is being able to talk the talk. In The Kentucky Barbecue Book, Wes Berry defines many key terms for his readers. Here are a few you may not know:

Burgoo: an “everything but the kitchen sink” rich stew made with several meats and vegetables, cooked up in large quantities at Owensboro’s International Barbecue Festival and found at barbecue joints in Kentucky, especially those in the “burgoo tree” (my term) that includes the counties of Daviess, Hopkins, and Christian, among others.324255_346022322091385_842314571_o

Chip or chipped: a style of barbecue preparation popular in Union Co. and Henderson Co., where heavily smoked exterior pieces of pork shoulders, hams, and mutton quarters are chopped and mixed with a thin tangy dip sauce, a bold flavor creation that’s salty and good as a sandwich.

Fast Eddy: a meat smoking apparatus that often utilizes wood pellets and a gas flame.

Hickory: one of the hardest of the hardwoods, hickory trees are nut-bearing friends of squirrels and Kentucky pitmasters, who favor the smoke and heat imparted by hickory over all other woods. Several different species of hickory trees live in North America, including shagbark, shellbark, mockernut, bitternut, and pignut. Some pitmasters claim they prefer one species of hickory—like shagbark—to others.

Monroe County dip: Sopping sauce favored in several south-central Kentucky counties, made with vinegar, butter, lard, salt, black and cayenne pepper, and sometimes other ingredients like tomato or mustard, used for basting meats as they cook slowly over hickory coals. Also served as a finishing sauce.

Mutton: Mature sheep, either female or castrated males. Mutton is Kentucky’s claim to barbecue fame, although only 10 percent of the barbecue places in the state serve it.

Smoke ring: the pinkish hue imparted to smoked meats (a very good thing).

Grab a copy of Wes berry’s book to learn even more BBQ lingo and scope out the best places for smoky meats and saucy treats in the state.

Kentuckians: What BBQ style are you?

During his travels, Wes Berry discovered that KY counties have different regional specialties. What counties would you visit to satisfy your cravings? Would you head to the tangier Union or Henderson for some famous KY mutton? Or would you keep it simple with a pork sandwich in McCracken or Caldwell? Perhaps you’re feeling a little saucier, and want to stop in Jefferson…

Whatever your preference, the wide variety of styles could make any BBQ enthusiast at home in Kentucky.

Don’t forget to enter this week’s giveaway for a chance to win a copy of Wes Berry’s The Kentucky Barbecue Book! In it, you can learn much more about the regional particularities of Kentucky barbecue.

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Map by Dick Gilbreath.