Tag Archives: dessert

Don’t Forget Dessert!

DuncanHinesComps3.inddWrap up your Thanksgiving festivities with a delicious dessert selected from Duncan Hines’ The Dessert Book. While the turkey, stuffing, and football may be important parts of many Thanksgivings, the dessert that follows is essential for every celebration. Whether you’re looking for a more traditional pumpkin or apple pie, or want to mix things up this holiday season, The Dessert Book will not leave you disappointed.  In the words of the food connoisseur himself, “One of the most important courses in any meal is the dessert…and, like the final act in a good play, is long remembered with pleasure.”

In the 1940s and 50s, Hines was the most respected restaurant reviewer in America, known for reliable recommendations of eating places from coast to coast. Today, many shoppers may recognize his name as a dependable brand of cake mix.

First published in 1955, this work is more than just a collection of recipes.  In addition to the more than 500 desserts in every conceivable category, Hines includes a number of helpful additions to ensure a perfect result every time, including pages on equivalent measures and weights, food weights and measures, recommended temperatures, substitutes, baking and cooking terms, useful kitchen utensils for dessert preparation, how to freeze desserts, and reducing and increasing recipes.

Enjoy a selection of a few desserts to try this week!

 

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Classic Kentucky Confections for a Sweet 4th of July

 

The Fourth of July holiday is all-American: bombastic, creative, unique, celebratory, commemorative, joyful, and unconstrained. And what’s more American (or more Kentucky) than apple pie?

Celebrate with new and vintage apple-flavored favorites from some of UPK’s best-loved cookbooks:

Click here to download a PDF of all the recipes to print.

Blue Grass Baked Apple Dumplings


 

Blue Ribbon Apples


 

Bourbon-AppleCrisp


 

Duncan Hine's Apple Pie-2

 

Dough-Not forget the Doughnuts!

University Press of Kentucky National Doughnut Day

There’s only one way to celebrate National Doughnut Day, and we’re on top of it! Enjoy this recipe for Bourbon-Infused Orange Doughnuts from Bourbon Desserts by Lynn Marie Hulsman, and share with us your #NationalDoughnutDay celebratory confections!

Bourbon-Infused Orange Doughnuts

Makes 1 to 2 dozen

 I love orange-flavored baked goods. They’re such a refreshing change from more ubiquitous flavors like chocolate, vanilla, and cinnamon. And this recipe, with the zingy fresh ginger, is a breath of fresh air. These doughnuts are hearty enough for winter, and can stand up to a cup of bold coffee, but also work well in warmer months, with the eye-brightening citrus note. For a fluffy doughnut that’s never greasy, make sure your oil is very hot (at least 365 degrees F). I like to make these in a very deep stockpot, with an extra-heavy, reinforced bottom. I’m not going to lie to you . . . frying these babies in lard brings a whole new nuance to decadent, but vegetable shortening or canola oil are fine alternatives.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups sugar, divided
  • 2 tablespoons orange zest
  • 1 cup orange juice
  • 3 tablespoons bourbon
  • 3 large eggs
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted

Method:

Bourbon Desserts Lynn Marie Hulsman University Press of KentuckyIn a medium mixing bowl, combine 1 cup of sugar, orange zest, orange juice, and bourbon, stirring lightly with a fork.

Using an electric mixer on medium speed, beat the eggs until light yellow, about 3 minutes. A little at a time, add sugar–orange zest mixture.

In a large mixing bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt.

Stir in the ginger.

Add the flour mixture to the egg mixture, a little at a time, beating until just combined, about 2 or 3 minutes for each of 2 or 3 additions. Do not overmix, or you’ll have tough, flat doughnuts.

Using a fork, stir in the butter.

Line two 9 x 13-inch baking sheets with parchment and sprinkle them liberally with flour. (Don’t skimp!) Set one sheet aside.

Turn the dough onto the other sheet, and sprinkle flour over the top. Flatten the dough with your hands until it is about 1/2 inch thick. If the dough is still wet, use more flour. Transfer the dough to the freezer until it’s well chilled, about 20 minutes.

While the cut doughnuts chill, gather up the dough scraps, and repeat the flattening and cutting process.

Once the dough is chilled, take it out of the freezer. Using a doughnut cutter (or a 3- to 3 1/2-inch drinking glass), cut out doughnut shapes. To cut out the holes, use your cutter (or an apple corer or the top of a small jar) to cut out circles of 1 inch in diameter.

Arrange the doughnuts and doughnut holes on the prepared sheet pan. Refrigerate the doughnuts for 30 minutes, or cover and refrigerate overnight to fry the next morning.

When you’re ready to fry, put enough shortening into a deep-sided (but not wide) pan to measure a depth of about 3 inches. Clip a frying or candy thermometer to the side of the pan and heat over medium heat until the oil comes to 365 degrees F. Have several layers of brown paper ready for draining. (I use grocery bags.) Do not use paper towels, as the doughnuts will wind up limp and soggy.

Find the tools you’ll need for flipping and lifting the doughnuts out of the oil, and lay them to the side of the stove. Once you start frying dough, things happen fast!

Pour the remaining 1/2 cup sugar into a large, wide bowl and set it aside.

Once your oil is ready, carefully add a few doughnuts to the hot oil, leaving plenty of space in between. Work in small batches so that the oil temperature doesn’t decrease. Fry until one side is golden and crispy, about 1 minute. Turn the doughnuts over and fry until the other side is golden, about 30 to 45 seconds.

When the doughnuts are done, set them on brown paper to drain for a few minutes. While they are still warm, lay each doughnut on top of the sugar, then flip the doughnut and set the uncoated side on a serving plate. Serve warm.

Store in a tightly lidded plastic container or tin for up to 5 days.

Cupid Countdown: Day Two!

Day2

Welcome back lovebirds! Today is the second day in our Cupid Countdown series! Aren’t you so excited? You should be! Today’s advice is near and dear to my heart—the stomach is close to your heart right? We’re talking about food! UPK has a slew of cookbooks available to meet your every, delicious need. Don’t break the bank at a restaurant this year. Instead, let us do the planning for you! UPK has a huge range of cookbooks that will satisfy your every, delicious need. We have the perfect meal planned out for you and your significant other this Valentine’s Day that will get you romantically cooking on a budget in the comfort of your own home.

Cocktails:

For him:
The Old Fashioned Whiskey Cocktail (The Old Fashioned by Albert Schmid)

Dissolve a small lump of sugar with a little water in a whiskey-glass; add two dashes Angostura bitters, a small piece ice, a piece lemon-peel, one jigger whiskey. Mix with small bar-spoon and serve, leaving spoon in glass.

For her:
Manhattan Italiano (The Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book by Joy Perrine and Susan Reigler)
08 Reigler p 36
2 oz. Woodford Reserve
1/2 oz. Tuaca
1/2 oz. triple sec
6 dashes Fee Brothers West Indian orange bitters or Regan’s No. 6 orange bitters
1/2 oz Cinzano Bianco (white sweet vermouth)

Combine, shake over ice, and strain into a chilled glass. Garnish with an orange slice and a large black pitted olive on a pick.
Appetizer😦Adventures in Good Cooking by Louis Hatchett)
Mushroom Canapes

1/2 lb. fresh mushrooms
4 tbsp. butter
2 scant tbsp. flour
1/2 pint thin cream
Salt and pepper as needed
Toasted bread (for serving)

Peel and chop mushrooms. Do not use stems. Place in frying pan with butter, cook until soft over slow fire. Add flour, season to taste. Cook again for a few minutes. Add thin cream, stirring constantly until it reaches consistency of a thick sauce. Place in refrigerator until ready to use, then spread on toasted rounds of bread.

Salad:
Winter Wheat Berry Salad (The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook by Maggie Green)

2 cups uncooked wheat berries
1 medium carrot, peeled and greated
1 rib celery, finely chopped
1 medium apple, unpeeled, cored and finely chopped
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
2 green onions, white and green parts, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup dried cranberries or dried cherries1/4 cup olive oil
2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
2 tbsp reduced-sodium soy sauce or tamari
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Place the wheat berries in a saucepan with enough water to cover by a few inches. Bring to a boil, lower heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 45 minutes. Test for doneness by tasting: the wheat berry should have a soft but chewy texture. If necessary, cover and continue to cook for 15 to 20 minutes, until the desired texture is achieved. Drain the wheat berries and cool to room temperature. Meanwhile, combine the carrot, celery, apple, parsley, green onion, garlic, dried cranberries, olive oil, lemon juice, soy sauce, and pepper. Stir in the cooled wheat berries. Serve at room temperature, or refrigerate until served.

Entree:
Flank Steak with Red Wine Pan Sauce (The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook by Maggie Green)

One 1.5 lb. flank steak
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 tbsp butter
1/4 cup minced green onion
1/4 cup dry red wine (one suitable for drinking)
1/2 cup beef stock
1 tbsp Dijon mustard2 tbsp. cracked black peppercorns
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, cut into 1-tablespoon pieces

Season the steak with salt and pepper. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees, and warm an oven-safe platter in the oven. In a large skillet, heat the butter over medium-high heat. Add the steak and brown on the first side for 4 minutes. Turn and brown for 4 minutes on the other side. Reduce the heat to low and cook for about 4 more minutes for a medium-rate steak. Adjust the cooking time for the desired degree of doneness. Place the steak on the warm platter.

In the same skillet, cook the green onion in the pan juices over medium-high heat. Add the red wine and cook, scraping the browned bits off the bottom of the pan. Let the wine reduce and thicken for about 1 minute. Stir in the beef stock, mustard, and peppercorns, and bring to a boil to reduce by half, about 5 minutes. Slowly whisk in one tablespoon of butter at a time, letting it melt and blend into the sauce before adding the next one. Thinly slice the steak and serve with the pan sauce.

On the side:
Oven-Roasted Root vegetables (The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook by Maggie Green)

1 lb. baby carrots or whole carrots, peeled and sliced
1 large onion, peeled and cut into chunks
4 parsnips, peeled and cut into chunks
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a large bowl, toss together all the ingredients. Transfer the mixture to a rimmed baking sheet and bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until soft and golden brown. Stir once during cooking. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Dessert:
Light Chocolate Layer Cake with Bourbon and Cream Cheese Frosting (Bourbon Desserts by Lynn Marie Hulsman)
chocolate cake
1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
2 cups water, boiling
2 3/4 cups sifted all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking powder
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for greasing pans
2 1/2 cups granulated sugar
4 large eggs, at room temperature
1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour three 9-inch cake pans. In a medium mixing bowl, gradually add boiling water to cocoa while whisking until the mixture is smooth. Set aside and allow it to cool completely. (Do this step about an hour before making the cake. At the same time, put eggs and butter on the counter to bring them to room temperature.)

In a large mixing bowl, sift together the flour, baking soda, salt, and baking powder. Using an electric mixer on high speed, cream together the butter and sugar until fluffy and pale yellow, about 5 minutes. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing to combine after each, then add the vanilla. Beat until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. With the mixer on low speed, beat in the flour mixture and cocoa mixture, alternating about 1/4 of each in turn. Beat only until combined; do not overbeat.

Divide the batter into the prepared pans and bake for about 25 minutes, until a wooden cake tester or metal skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean. Cool the cakes in the pans set on cooling racks for about 15 minutes, then turn the cakes out onto the racks until completely cooled, about 30 minutes.

To frost the cake, place one cake layer on a platter; spread with about 1 cup of frosting. Top with another cake layer; spread with another 1 cup frosting. Top with the third cake layer; using a spatula, spread the remaining frosting in decorative swirls over the top of the cake, leaving the sides bare. Once frosted, store in an airtight cake safe or tin in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.
And there you have your 2015 Valentine’s Day menu! For more information on the cookbooks that were used to find these recipes,visit our website!

        

  

10 Books to Help You Celebrate Bourbon Heritage Month Like a Kentuckian

Nobody in Kentucky needs a reason to celebrate bourbon more than we already do each day, but if Congress wants to dedicate a whole month to the cause, we certainly won’t object. Thankfully, Congress did just that in 2007 when it declared September National Bourbon Heritage Month.

Over the past decade, bourbon has exploded on the national scene in a big way finally catching up with what Kentuckians knew all along. Here at the University Press of Kentucky, we’ve long been connoisseurs of the historic spirit so we’ve compiled a list books that should interest everyone from the bourbon historian to the home cook. Enjoy and read responsibly!


If it’s a month-long bourbon tour you’re looking for, this travel guide will not let you down.

Kentucky Bourbon Country: The Essential Travel Guide

Like wine lovers who dream of traveling to Bordeaux or beer enthusiasts with visions of the breweries of Belgium, bourbon lovers plan their pilgrimages to Kentucky’s bourbon country. And what a country it is! Some of the most famous distilleries are tucked away in the scenic countryside of the Bluegrass region, stretching between Louisville, Bardstown, and Lexington. Locals and tourists alike seek out the finest flavors of Kentucky as interest in America’s only native spirit continues to grow.

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Press Play: Bourbon Desserts, The Air Force, and Remembering Emmett Till

This past Friday, August 29, the Wall Street Journal featured a review of Lynn Marie Hulsman’s Bourbon Desserts. Here’s a taste of what they had to say:

“Bourbon, compared with its older cousin, Scotch, has a hint of caramel sweetness to it, making it a natural flavoring agent for dessert. Ms. Hulsman’s recipes for cakes, cookies, custards, ice creams and other confections are not designed for the calorie-shy, but they may well enchant anyone with a sweet tooth and an interest in traditional and modern American cuisine. Her presentations are clear and concise, with short introductory paragraphs preceding her instructions.” —Wall Street Journal


For the past couple of weeks Robert M. Farley’s Grounded: The Case for Abolishing the United States Air Force has been stirring up some conversation in publications like Aviation Week and The Daily Beast as readers digest Farley’s thought-provoking book.

Farley himself has continued to contribute to that conversation writing recently in Real Clear Defense about the Air Force’s new strategic white paper:

“Addressed to ‘Airmen and Airpower Advocates,’ America’s Air Force: A Call to the Future sounds a lot of familiar notes. It hypes the concept of “strategic agility,” a worthy contribution, but ends up defining the service’s contribution in reactive terms.  A Call to the Future tackles procurement failures and speaks to the need for partnerships, but fails to contribute seriously to the most gripping procurement problem the Air Force currently faces – the F-35 – or to provide a framework for thinking about the failure of airpower partnerships in Iraq and Afghanistan.” —Real Clear Defense


Finally, Darryl Mace, author of In Remembrance of Emmett Till: Regional Stories and Media Responses to the Black Freedom Struggle, spoke with radio station WHYY to remember Emmett Till on the 59th anniversary of his murder. During their conversation, Mace compares the the media landscape when Till was killed with the one we face today:

It is a very different time. There is a desire for instant news. Everything is tweeted and everything is blogged. The 24-hour news cycle really makes people hungry to consume media… You can’t escape the media input now.

You can listen to Darryl Mace’s full interview on the subject matter at WHYY.