Tag Archives: Cookbooks

Recipes from Bourbon Country

Celebrate Wellness Wednesday with three recipes from Chef Albert W. A. Schmid’s newest cookbook Burgoo, Barbecue and Bourbon: A Kentucky Culinary Trinity9780813169880

In this new book, Award-winning author and chef Albert W. A. Schmid serves up a feast for readers, sharing recipes and lore surrounding these storied culinary traditions. He introduces readers to new and forgotten versions of favorite regional dishes from the time of Daniel Boone to today and uncovers many lost recipes, such as Mush Biscuits, Half Moon Fried Pies, and the Original Kentucky Whiskey Cake. Featuring cuisine from the early American frontier to the present day, this entertaining book is filled with fascinating tidbits and innovative recipes for the modern cook.

Today’s recipes come from the section of dishes made to pair with the book’s central meal of burgoo, although they would be well suited to any meal.


Chicken Barbecued in a Brown Paper Bag

4 servings

3 tablespoons catsup

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

2 tablespoons butter

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

2 tablespoons vinegar

3 tablespoons brown sugar

1 teaspoon dry mustard

4 tablespoons water

1 teaspoon chili powder

1 teaspoon paprika

1 chicken, cut in pieces

Preheat oven to 500 degrees F. Combine the sauce ingredients. Grease the inside of a heavy paper grocery bag and place it inside a roaster pan. Salt and pepper the chicken pieces, dip each in the sauce, and place in the bag. Pour the remaining sauce over them in the bag. Close the bag with a double fold and secure with a medal clip. Bake uncovered for 50 minutes, then cover the pan and roast for 15 minutes longer. Serve extra sauce in a separate bowl.


Angel Biscuits

Makes 6 dozen

5 cups all-purpose flour

¾ cups vegetable shortening

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

3 teaspoons baking poweder

3 tablespoons sugar

1 yeast cake (1 packet of yeast) dissolved in ½ cup lukewarm water

2 cups buttermilk

Sift dry ingredients together; cut in shortening until mixed thoroughly. add buttermilk and dissolved yeast. Work together with a large spoon until the flour mixture is completely moistened. Cover and put in the refrigerator until ready to use.

When ready, preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Take out as much batter as needed; roll it onto a floured board to 1⁄2-inch thickness and cut into rounds or squares. Bake on a greased cookie sheet or in a round 8-inch or 9-inch cake pan for 12 minutes, or until brown.


Half Moon Fried Pies

Makes 16 miniature pies

1 pound dried apples or peaches

¾ cup sugar

2 tablespoons butter or margarine

2 teaspoons cinnamon (to taste)

piecrust

lard

additional sugar

Cover the dried fruit in water and soak overnight. Drain the fruit, add a small amount of fresh water, and cook slowly until tender. Mash the fruit. add the sugar, butter or margarine, and cinnamon. Stir well and let the mixture cool.

Make your favorite piecrust, using only half the regular amount of shortening. Cut into circles 4–6 inches in diameter. Place a generous tablespoon of the fruit filling on one side of each circle. Fold the other side over and seal firmly along the edge with your fingertips or a fork. Fry in about 1⁄2 inch of hot lard, turning once. When the pastry is browned, remove and drain on paper towels. While the pies are still warm, sprinkle them lightly with sugar.

Alternatively, bake the pies at 400 degree F. for about 30 minutes; brush the top with melted butter before baking in order to make the surface crisp.


For the stories behind these recipes and many more, preorder the book here.

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Classic Kentucky Confections for a Sweet 4th of July

 

The Fourth of July holiday is all-American: bombastic, creative, unique, celebratory, commemorative, joyful, and unconstrained. And what’s more American (or more Kentucky) than apple pie?

Celebrate with new and vintage apple-flavored favorites from some of UPK’s best-loved cookbooks:

Click here to download a PDF of all the recipes to print.

Blue Grass Baked Apple Dumplings


 

Blue Ribbon Apples


 

Bourbon-AppleCrisp


 

Duncan Hine's Apple Pie-2

 

Five Days of Giveaways: Classic Kentucky Cooking on #Throwback Thursday

004_InstagramWe’re in the holiday spirit here at the University Press of Kentucky, and we wanted to share a little of that cheer with our fans. All week we’ll be giving away a new book in a new way to a lucky someone.

Today is Throwback Thursday (#TBT) and we’re giving away a copy of The Blue Grass Cook Book to one of our fans on Instagram or Twitter. We’ll be sharing menus and recipes from the book (and a few other classic Kentucky cookbooks) all day. All of our new Instagram and Twitter followers, photo likes, comments, retweets, and mentions will be automatically entered to win.

To whet your appetite, enjoy Mrs. Garrad’s “Kentucky Burgout” from The Blue Grass Cook Book, and the original book review from the New York Times in 1904!

Kentucky Burgout

Mrs. Garrad, Bourbon County, Kentucky

  • 6 squirrels
  • 6 birds
  • 1 1/2 gallons of water
  • 1 teacup of pearl barley
  • 1 quart of tomatoes
  • 1 quart of corn
  • 1 quart of oysters
  • 1 pint of sweet cream
  • 1/4 pound of butter
  • 2 tablespoons of flour
  • Season to taste

Boil the squirrels and birds in the water till tender and remove all the bones. Add barley and vegetables and cook slowly for 1 hour. Ten minutes before serving add the oysters and cream with butter and flour rubbed together. Season and serve hot.

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Five Days of Giveaways: Cozy Up to Winter Favorites Wednesday

002_Facebook9780813193489We’re in the holiday spirit here at the University Press of Kentucky, and we wanted to share a little of that cheer with our fans. All week we’ll be giving away a new book in a new way to a lucky someone.

Today is Winter Favorites Wednesday and we’re giving away a copy of Out of Kentucky Kitchens to someone on Facebook. We’ll be sharing menus and recipes from the book all day on Facebook, so friend, share, like, or comment away. We will enter everyone who interacts with us on Facebook today (12/16/15) in a random drawing to win a free copy of Out of Kentucky Kitchens!

Want a taste of Marion Flexner’s classic cookbook? Oh, go on then!

Hot Spiced Wassail-1

4th of July

Food + Friends + Fireworks + Fun = A 4th of July Celebration

In The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook, Maggie Green offers up not only delicious, seasonal recipes using fresh, local ingredients, but also provides menus to make holiday planning easy. For a classic, Kentucky-proud celebration, Maggie’s menu includes:

  • Ale-8 One Slow Cooker Pork Barbecue with Brown Sugar Bourbon Barbecue Sauce
  • Sweet and Sour Creamy Coleslaw
  • Cornmeal-Crusted Fried Green Tomatoes
  • Nina’s Potato Salad
  • Sweet Bourbon Baked Beans
  • Buttermilk Black-‘n’-Blue Berry Cobbler
  • and Fresh Herbed Lemonade, Sweet Iced Tea, or mix ’em up in an Arnold Palmer

You’ll find a personal favorite of ours below, or a printable version of the recipes on Maggie’s menu here. For more great meals (and recipes), The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook is available wherever fine books are sold.

Succulent Pork Barbecue

Every Kentucky cook needs a good pork barbecue recipe up his or her sleeve, and I have learned several juicy tips over the years.

First, a bit of terminology: the best meat for pork barbecue is an economical, rectangular roast from the top part of the pig’s shoulder called Boston butt, Boston roast, fresh pork butt, or Boston-style butt. (Don’t ask me why a pork shoulder is called a butt.) Pork shoulder is sold bone-in or boneless, in sizes ranging from 4 to 8 pounds. I consider this cut the chicken thigh of a pig—the meat is moist, dark, and distinctive. The well-exercised muscles in the shoulder crisscross around a bone and are supported by collagen and tendons, with fat marbled throughout. Because of this hodgepodge of muscle, tendon, and collagen, the meat has to be coaxed into tenderness. Given enough time to cook, though, it shreds easily for the best pulled pork barbecue around.

The flavor varies, depending on the method of cooking—smoked, oven-roasted, or slow cooked—but the end result will be fork-tender goodness. What does fork tender mean? Poke a fork in the cooked pork and twist: the meat shouldn’t feel tight, and it readily falls apart.

Ale-8 One Slow Cooker Pork Barbecue

Nothing holds a candle to home-smoked meat, but this slow-cooked version works in a pinch—a large pinch piled high on a bun, that is. It uses Kentucky’s own soft drink, Ale-8 One. This spicy soda, bottled in Winchester since 1926, is sold around the state. If Ale-8 One isn’t available, substitute a spicy ginger ale. Just like a true, wood-fired smoking process, low and slow is the rule. For best results, start early in the morning or let the pork slow-cook overnight. In my (oblong) slow cooker set on low, the pork takes about 11 hours to reach a fork-tender state. Check the tenderness of the meat after about 10 hours to gauge how quickly or slowly your slow cooker cooks.

Makes about 12 servings

  • 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  • One 4- to 4.-pound pork shoulder or Boston butt pork roast
  • One 12-ounce can Ale-8 One
  • 2 tablespoons Barbecue Dry Rub
  • 2 cups Brown Sugar Bourbon Barbecue Sauce, or the barbecue sauce of your choice

Place half the onion in the bottom of a slow cooker. Lay the pork shoulder on top of the onion. Pour the soda over the pork and sprinkle with the dry rub and remaining onion. Cover and cook on low for 11 hours. At this point, the meat should be fork tender, which happens when the internal temperature reaches about 200 degrees F. If it’s not fork tender, turn the meat over, cover, and cook for 1 to 2 more hours. When the pork is done, place it on a platter and shred and chop the meat. Keep the meat warm, and serve the barbecue sauce warm on the side. Alternatively, discard the juice from the slow cooker and place the meat back in it. Mix in the barbecue sauce and warm before serving.

Brown Sugar Bourbon Barbecue Sauce

This sweet sauce, flavored with bourbon, is inspired by a recipe I developed for Barbara Smith.

Makes about 4 cups.

  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 1 cup ketchup
  • One 12-ounce bottle chili sauce
  • 1/2 cup Kentucky bourbon
  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/4 cup Kentucky sorghum or molasses
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1⁄8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

In a saucepan, heat the canola oil over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the ketchup, chili sauce, bourbon, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce, sorghum, vinegar, and cayenne pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook for about 10 minutes. Serve warm, or let cool and store in glass jars in the refrigerator.

Kentucky Fresh Cookbook Maggie Green

Don’t be late! Mother’s Day is this Sunday

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Make sure you get the right gift for Mom BEFORE Mother’s Day happens this Sunday. . . you know she deserves it for putting up with you, right? Below, you’ll find a few of our picks for books that your Mom will love, no matter her style.

 Glamorous Mom

  

 

Chef Mom

  

 

Literary Mom

  

 

Musical Mom

  

 

Sporty Mom

  

 

Outdoors-y Mom

  

 

Bourbon Mom

  

 

Kentucky Proud Mom

  

 

Bourbon Desserts: The Best of Both Worlds!

Many people think of bourbon as a dessert because of its deliciously sweet taste. But what happens when you actually add bourbon to a dessert? Pure magic. You can take our word for it on this one.

Kentucky Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie with Bourbon Whipped Cream

You might already be familiar with the traditional bourbon desserts that are popular in and around the Bluegrass state. Bourbon Balls, a sinfully delicious candy made with bourbon, chocolate, and pecans, have been a staple of the bourbon-dessert industry for decades.

bourbon balls

For fans of colder treats, Bourbon Ball Ice Cream has become an increasingly popular dessert to many. Keeneland has been adding bourbon to their famous bread pudding for years—and you don’t hear anyone complaining!

Now that we’ve gotten your attention, we’re sure you want to try all of these desserts yourself. Just to ensure that we weren’t making anything up and to do some of your own field research, of course.

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The best place to start your bourbon dessert journey is in UPK’s book Bourbon Desserts by celebrated food writer and home chef, Lynn Marie Hulsman. The title says it all people.

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This book features more than seventy-five decadent desserts using America’s native spirit. Hulsman brings together a collection of confections highlighting the complex flavor notes of Kentucky bourbon, which are sure to delight the senses. Giving readers the confidence to prepare these easy-to-execute desserts, this cookbook also features fun facts about bourbon and its origins as well as tips and tricks for working in the kitchen.

Interested? We know. Keep reading for a never-before-seen recipe from the book!

Sinner’s Chocolate Angel Food Cake

Growing up, I heard lots of talk from my Grandma and the ladies in her front-room, one-chair beauty salon about “reducing.” Apart from cantaloupe and cottage cheese, or half a grapefruit with a maraschino cherry on top, the only virtuous dessert was angel food cake. I never cared for the sticky, Styrofoam redolent packaged concoctions from the supermarket, though. Here’s my twist: A homemade version that actually tastes like wholesome food. Perhaps it’s a little lighter, with fewer calories than some desserts. I don’t really care. I’m after thrills like bourbon and chocolate, and they’re in there. Sinful? You decide.

Makes 1 10-inch x 4-inch angel food cake

1 tablespoon butter, for greasing
3/4 cups all-purpose flour, sifted twice, plus more for flouring
1/2 cup cocoa powder (I like Scharffenberger’s)
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 cup egg whites (from 6 to 7 large or 8 to 9 small eggs), at room temperature
1 tablespoon bourbon

Grease a 10-inch x 4-inch tube pan with butter, dust it with flour, and set it aside.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Sift the flour twice into a large mixing bowl, then measure it into another large mixing bowl.

Add the cocoa to the flour, then sift together three times. Add the cream of tartar, and sift the dry mixture together one more time, then set it aside.

In a separate large mixing bowl, combine the sugar and salt, and sift them together four times, then set the mixture aside.

Using an electric mixer, set to medium-high speed, beat the egg whites until stiff, but not dry, until you have medium-high peaks, about 5 minutes.

Sprinkle on enough of the flour-cocoa mixture to dust the top of the foam without collapsing it, then gently fold it in with a spatula. Alternate with small amounts of the sugar-salt mixture, and continue until all of the dry ingredients are folded into the egg whites.

Add the bourbon to the mixture, and fold in gently using the spatula.

Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan, and bake for 15 minutes at 350 degrees F. After 15 minutes, reduce the heat to 300 degrees F, and bake for 45 more minutes or until a wooden cake tester or metal skewer inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean.

Invert the entire pan onto a wire rack on the countertop, and allow it to cool for two to three hours. Once it’s cool, loosen the cake from the pan using a butter knife, and set it upright on a cake plate.

Store in an airtight plastic cake safe or tin for up to 1 week.


 

If you’re interested in buying the book, you can pre-order it on our website. It’s expected to be released in August of this year! Be sure to check out Hulsman’s website if you can’t get enough of this talented author!