Tag Archives: cocktails

Preparing for the Kentucky Derby: Kentucky Press Style

Unfortunately, due to the circumstances of the United States, the Kentucky Derby has been pushed back until September 5th. This gives everyone plenty of time to prepare for the day and make it the best Derby celebration so far! Whether you’re a native Kentuckian looking to spice up your Derby day party or someone new to the festivities, these books will help you prepare.

WHICH FORK DO I USE WITH MY BOURBON? by Peggy Noe Stevens & Susan Reigler

UPK has many books that can help spice up your Derby day celebrations. WHICH FORK DO I USE WITH MY BOURBON? has an entire section dedicated to the Kentucky Derby and can help make the food, drink, and decorations go above and beyond. This is the perfect party-planning book. As well as offering step by step recipes for food and drinks, Stevens and Reigler give expert tips and tricks on everything you could need. They bring bourbon country to your table with this cookbook inspired by the different hosting traditions of five different distilleries.

“If there were two people I would turn to for help with bourbon and food, they would be Peggy and Susan. Individually, their knowledge and experience are impressive, but together, their collective depth and wisdom are staggering. Put your faith in this duo and let them help you entertain, amaze, and blow minds in a style worthy of Kentucky’s hospitality-rich and bourbon-drenched history. This book should be a shelf staple for any self-respecting bourbon fan.”

Rob Allanson, managing editor of American Whiskey magazine
THE KENTUCKY MINT JULEP by Colonel Joe Nickell

Are you more of a lay back on the couch with a drink while watching the Derby person? Then the cocktail book, THE KENTUCKY MINT JULEP, can help you perfect that iconic Derby day drink or any other drink you desperately want to try. More than just a recipe book, THE KENTUCKY MINT JULEP dives into the lore and legend of the famous drink. It also shares insight into garnishing and serving as well as choosing the right julep cup.

One of our many Derby books is SPECTACULAR BID, which details the life of almost Triple Crown winner Spectacular Bid. A safety pin was the only thing that kept him from winning the Belmont Stakes, where he finished third due to the injury to his hoof.

SPECTACULAR BID by Peter Lee, THE KENTUCKY DERBY by James C Nicholson, and SIR BARTON AND THE MAKING OF THE TRIPLE CROWN by Jennifer S. Kelly

For all the history fans out there, UPK has an astounding array of history books about the Derby. Read about Sir Barton and how he was the first horse to win the Triple Crown in SIR BARTON AND THE MAKING OF THE TRIPLE CROWN. With multiple English and American winners in his pedigree, Sir Barton was destined to shine from the start. His wins inspired the ultimate chase for greatness in American horse racing and established an elite group that would grow to include legends like Citation, Secretariat, and American Pharoah.

THE KENTUCKY DERBY is full of the culture and history behind the derby, from its humble beginnings as a variation of England’s Epsom Derby to America’s “greatest two minutes in sports”. No other American past time is as full of pageantry, history, or tradition as the Kentucky Derby. For more than 130 years, spectators have been fascinated by the magnificent horses that run the Louisville track.

Though we’re all wishing the Derby was sooner rather than later, these books can fill the Derby-sized hole in your heart. Kick back with a Derby inspired meal and drink, or settle in your favorite chair with a Triple Crown winner.

Celebrate National Bourbon Heritage Month With These Bourbon Books

Nobody in Kentucky needs a reason to celebrate bourbon more than we already do each day, but if Congress wants to dedicate a whole month to the cause, we certainly won’t object. Thankfully, Congress did just that in 2007 when it declared September National Bourbon Heritage Month.

Over the past decade, bourbon has exploded on the national scene in a big way finally catching up with what Kentuckians knew all along. Here at the University Press of Kentucky, we’ve long been connoisseurs of the historic spirit so we’ve compiled a list books that should interest everyone from the bourbon historian to the home cook. Enjoy and read responsibly!


Bourbon New Books on America's Native Spiritmanhattan.final.inddThe Manhattan Cocktail covers everything that the aficionado needs to know about the classic cocktail through an examination of its history and ingredients. Author Albert W. A. Schmid dispels several persistent myths, including the tale that the Manhattan was created in 1874 by bartenders at New York City’s Manhattan Club to honor the newly elected Governor Samuel Jones Tilden at Lady Randolph Churchill’s request. Schmid also explores the places and people that have contributed to the popularity of the drink and inspired its lore, including J. P. Morgan, who enjoyed a Manhattan every day at the end of trading on Wall Street.


PeacheeCvCompF.inddIn The Birth of Bourbon, award-winning photographer Carol Peachee takes readers on an unforgettable tour of lost distilleries as well as facilities undergoing renewal, such as the famous Old Taylor and James E. Pepper distilleries in Lexington, Kentucky. This beautiful book also includes spaces that well-known brands, including Maker’s Mark, Woodford Reserve, Four Roses, and Buffalo Trace, have preserved as a homage to their rich histories.


If it’s a month-long bourbon tour you’re looking for, this travel guide will not let you down.

Kentucky Bourbon Country: The Essential Travel Guide

Like wine lovers who dream of traveling to Bordeaux or beer enthusiasts with visions of the breweries of Belgium, bourbon lovers plan their pilgrimages to Kentucky’s bourbon country. And what a country it is! Some of the most famous distilleries are tucked away in the scenic countryside of the Bluegrass region, stretching between Louisville, Bardstown, and Lexington. Locals and tourists alike seek out the finest flavors of Kentucky as interest in America’s only native spirit continues to grow.

Continue reading

Happy Bourbon Heritage Month!

September is finally here, which means it’s Bourbon Heritage Month, a national celebration of America’s native spirit! We’ll also be raising our glasses next weekend at the Kentucky Bourbon Festival in Bardstown, Kentucky. Be sure to stop by and say hi!

Kentucky Bourbon Festival


Bourbon New Books on America's Native Spirit

manhattan.final.inddThe Manhattan Cocktail covers everything that the aficionado needs to know about the classic cocktail through an examination of its history and ingredients. Author Albert W. A. Schmid dispels several persistent myths, including the tale that the Manhattan was created in 1874 by bartenders at New York City’s Manhattan Club to honor the newly elected Governor Samuel Jones Tilden at Lady Randolph Churchill’s request. Schmid also explores the places and people that have contributed to the popularity of the drink and inspired its lore, including J. P. Morgan, who enjoyed a Manhattan every day at the end of trading on Wall Street.


PeacheeCvCompF.inddIn The Birth of Bourbon, award-winning photographer Carol Peachee takes readers on an unforgettable tour of lost distilleries as well as facilities undergoing renewal, such as the famous Old Taylor and James E. Pepper distilleries in Lexington, Kentucky. This beautiful book also includes spaces that well-known brands, including Maker’s Mark, Woodford Reserve, Four Roses, and Buffalo Trace, have preserved as a homage to their rich histories.

 

Blueberry Bourbon Beer Punch Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book University Press of Kentucky

We’re not ‘Blue’ about this Bourbon Punch

Yesterday, we brought you a suggested menu from The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook for your 4th of July cookout. Today, let’s talk signature cocktails! There’s no better place to turn than The Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book for martinis, cocktails, and punches featuring every Kentuckian’s favorite spirit. For an on-theme 4th of July punch, we’re recommending the refreshing (and blue!) Blueberry Bourbon Beer Punch. Or, if you’re looking for a drink with more “sparkle,” check out last year’s recipe: The Kentucky Sparkler.

Blueberry Bourbon Beer Punch

From The Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book by Joy Perrine and Susan Reigler.

Don’t chuckle over this seemingly unlikely combination of ingredients until you’ve tried it. It’s summer in a glass.

  • 2 bottles cold Wild Blue™ blueberry lager
  • 1 can (12-ounce) frozen Minute Maid™ pink lemonade (defrosted, but no water added)
  • 2 ounces blueberry-infused bourbon (Lightly crush 1/3 of a full pint of blueberries and combine with remaining whole berries and bourbon. Shake and let steep 3 days. Strain, label, date, and refrigerate.)
  • 10 ounces water
  • 2 lemons cut into wedges
  • 1 cup fresh blueberries

Into a 1 1/2 – 2 quart glass pitcher, pour the bottles of beer. Add lemonade, bourbon, and water; stir. After the foam subsides, squeeze and drop in the lemon wedges. Stir. Add ice and blueberries. Stir again. Serve over ice.

Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book University Press of Kentucky

Cupid Countdown: Day Two!

Day2

Welcome back lovebirds! Today is the second day in our Cupid Countdown series! Aren’t you so excited? You should be! Today’s advice is near and dear to my heart—the stomach is close to your heart right? We’re talking about food! UPK has a slew of cookbooks available to meet your every, delicious need. Don’t break the bank at a restaurant this year. Instead, let us do the planning for you! UPK has a huge range of cookbooks that will satisfy your every, delicious need. We have the perfect meal planned out for you and your significant other this Valentine’s Day that will get you romantically cooking on a budget in the comfort of your own home.

Cocktails:

For him:
The Old Fashioned Whiskey Cocktail (The Old Fashioned by Albert Schmid)

Dissolve a small lump of sugar with a little water in a whiskey-glass; add two dashes Angostura bitters, a small piece ice, a piece lemon-peel, one jigger whiskey. Mix with small bar-spoon and serve, leaving spoon in glass.

For her:
Manhattan Italiano (The Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book by Joy Perrine and Susan Reigler)
08 Reigler p 36
2 oz. Woodford Reserve
1/2 oz. Tuaca
1/2 oz. triple sec
6 dashes Fee Brothers West Indian orange bitters or Regan’s No. 6 orange bitters
1/2 oz Cinzano Bianco (white sweet vermouth)

Combine, shake over ice, and strain into a chilled glass. Garnish with an orange slice and a large black pitted olive on a pick.
Appetizer😦Adventures in Good Cooking by Louis Hatchett)
Mushroom Canapes

1/2 lb. fresh mushrooms
4 tbsp. butter
2 scant tbsp. flour
1/2 pint thin cream
Salt and pepper as needed
Toasted bread (for serving)

Peel and chop mushrooms. Do not use stems. Place in frying pan with butter, cook until soft over slow fire. Add flour, season to taste. Cook again for a few minutes. Add thin cream, stirring constantly until it reaches consistency of a thick sauce. Place in refrigerator until ready to use, then spread on toasted rounds of bread.

Salad:
Winter Wheat Berry Salad (The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook by Maggie Green)

2 cups uncooked wheat berries
1 medium carrot, peeled and greated
1 rib celery, finely chopped
1 medium apple, unpeeled, cored and finely chopped
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
2 green onions, white and green parts, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup dried cranberries or dried cherries1/4 cup olive oil
2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
2 tbsp reduced-sodium soy sauce or tamari
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Place the wheat berries in a saucepan with enough water to cover by a few inches. Bring to a boil, lower heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 45 minutes. Test for doneness by tasting: the wheat berry should have a soft but chewy texture. If necessary, cover and continue to cook for 15 to 20 minutes, until the desired texture is achieved. Drain the wheat berries and cool to room temperature. Meanwhile, combine the carrot, celery, apple, parsley, green onion, garlic, dried cranberries, olive oil, lemon juice, soy sauce, and pepper. Stir in the cooled wheat berries. Serve at room temperature, or refrigerate until served.

Entree:
Flank Steak with Red Wine Pan Sauce (The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook by Maggie Green)

One 1.5 lb. flank steak
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 tbsp butter
1/4 cup minced green onion
1/4 cup dry red wine (one suitable for drinking)
1/2 cup beef stock
1 tbsp Dijon mustard2 tbsp. cracked black peppercorns
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, cut into 1-tablespoon pieces

Season the steak with salt and pepper. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees, and warm an oven-safe platter in the oven. In a large skillet, heat the butter over medium-high heat. Add the steak and brown on the first side for 4 minutes. Turn and brown for 4 minutes on the other side. Reduce the heat to low and cook for about 4 more minutes for a medium-rate steak. Adjust the cooking time for the desired degree of doneness. Place the steak on the warm platter.

In the same skillet, cook the green onion in the pan juices over medium-high heat. Add the red wine and cook, scraping the browned bits off the bottom of the pan. Let the wine reduce and thicken for about 1 minute. Stir in the beef stock, mustard, and peppercorns, and bring to a boil to reduce by half, about 5 minutes. Slowly whisk in one tablespoon of butter at a time, letting it melt and blend into the sauce before adding the next one. Thinly slice the steak and serve with the pan sauce.

On the side:
Oven-Roasted Root vegetables (The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook by Maggie Green)

1 lb. baby carrots or whole carrots, peeled and sliced
1 large onion, peeled and cut into chunks
4 parsnips, peeled and cut into chunks
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a large bowl, toss together all the ingredients. Transfer the mixture to a rimmed baking sheet and bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until soft and golden brown. Stir once during cooking. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Dessert:
Light Chocolate Layer Cake with Bourbon and Cream Cheese Frosting (Bourbon Desserts by Lynn Marie Hulsman)
chocolate cake
1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
2 cups water, boiling
2 3/4 cups sifted all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking powder
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for greasing pans
2 1/2 cups granulated sugar
4 large eggs, at room temperature
1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour three 9-inch cake pans. In a medium mixing bowl, gradually add boiling water to cocoa while whisking until the mixture is smooth. Set aside and allow it to cool completely. (Do this step about an hour before making the cake. At the same time, put eggs and butter on the counter to bring them to room temperature.)

In a large mixing bowl, sift together the flour, baking soda, salt, and baking powder. Using an electric mixer on high speed, cream together the butter and sugar until fluffy and pale yellow, about 5 minutes. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing to combine after each, then add the vanilla. Beat until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. With the mixer on low speed, beat in the flour mixture and cocoa mixture, alternating about 1/4 of each in turn. Beat only until combined; do not overbeat.

Divide the batter into the prepared pans and bake for about 25 minutes, until a wooden cake tester or metal skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean. Cool the cakes in the pans set on cooling racks for about 15 minutes, then turn the cakes out onto the racks until completely cooled, about 30 minutes.

To frost the cake, place one cake layer on a platter; spread with about 1 cup of frosting. Top with another cake layer; spread with another 1 cup frosting. Top with the third cake layer; using a spatula, spread the remaining frosting in decorative swirls over the top of the cake, leaving the sides bare. Once frosted, store in an airtight cake safe or tin in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.
And there you have your 2015 Valentine’s Day menu! For more information on the cookbooks that were used to find these recipes,visit our website!

        

  

It’s 5 O’Clock in Kentucky

April is a special time of year here in the Bluegrass for several reasons. Keeneland, a favorite in UPK’s hometown of Lexington, is finally open for their Spring Meet. The Derby is right around the corner. That vicious winter has hopefully been permanently laid to rest. Tailgate season isn’t too far away.

All of these reasons culminate in the heartwarming truth that it is once again acceptable to drink bourbon before 5 o’clock (thanks in part to Jimmy Buffett and Alan Jackson). We at UPK are fortunate enough to have dozens of bourbon recipes at our disposal from some of our most talented authors and their various works.

'Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book' 30% OFF: $10.47

In The Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book, Joy Perrine and Susan Reigler provide a reader-friendly handbook featuring more than 100 recipes including seasonal drinks, after-dinner bourbon cocktails, Derby cocktails, and even medicinal toddies. See below for a fun twist on an old classic!

Dark & Bloody Bourbon Mary

This is the perfect drink for a Derby brunch. I relished rising to the challenge from those who said a bloody Mary couldn’t be made with bourbon. Ha!

1 teaspoon salt/pepper/paprika mix
2 ounces Woodford Reserve
2 large lemon wedges
1 tablespoon Bourbon Barrel Aged Worcestershire Sauce
1 can (6 ounces) Campbell’s tomato juice

To prepare the seasoning mix, combine in a mortar one part each smoked sea salt and smoked pepper and two parts smoked paprika, all from Bourbon Barrel Foods (www.bourbonbarrelfoods.com). Finely crush with a pestle and shake together in a jar.

To a pint glass or large mason jar filled with ice, add the bourbon, squeeze and drop in the lemon wedges, and add the teaspoon of seasoning mix and the Worcestershire sauce. Shake. Add more ice and the can of tomato juice. Shake again. Garnish with a long straw, baby corn, a large pitted black olive, and a cherry pepper, all on a stick.


If you’re interested in this recipe and more like it, head over to our website to buy the book.

Stay tuned to our blog for posts about all things bourbon for the next couple weeks!

 

Whisky or Whiskey—What do you drink?

Bourbon is a kind of whisk(e)y, and whisk(e)y can be spelled two ways. According to The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook, the term is an English word of Celtic origin that comes from “uisce beatha” in Gaelic and “usice beatha” in Irish and is equivalent to “eau de vie” in French or “aqua vitae” in Latin. All of those terms mean “the water of life.”

1887How someone spells whisk(e)y has a lot to do with where the beverage is made, where the person’s family comes from, and what tradition he or she is trying to follow.

There is Scotch whisky and Irish whiskey. As Scots moved to Nova Scotia (New Scotland), they brought with them the technology to make a distilled beverage and the whisky spelling to go along with it—the reason why all Canadian whisky is spelled without the e.  In the U.S., family origin comes into play when determining the spelling of this spirited beverage. There’s Makers Mark and Old Forester whisky and Jim Beam and Old Rip Van Winkle whiskey. In any case, all four of these are considered bourbon and can technically be made outside of Kentucky, even though this drink is most widely known as native to the Bluegrass.

Below are two bourbon cocktail recipes Albert Schmid included in his book The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook!

The Most Famous of All Kentucky Breakfasts

  • 1 steak
  • 1 quart bourbon whiskey
  • 1 man (you can substitute a woman)
  • 1 dog

The man throws the steak to the dog and drinks the bourbon.

“This is an old joke, but it is true that many years ago hard liquors were consumed at breakfast time. In fact a “cock tail” was originally a morning drink.” – Schmid

Bluegrass Breakfast

Here is an example of a “breakfast” drink combining bourbon with several items that people associate with breakfast. This drink uses the process of “muddling” fruit to extract the juice and flavor from the fruit for the drink. Muddling is crushing the fruit with a small bat-shaped tool. The back of a spoon will work if you don’t have a muddler.

  • 1/4 cup fresh blueberries
  • Half a lemon, sliced
  • 6-inch sprig of fresh rosemary
  • Ice
  • 1/4 cup Kentucky bourbon
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup

In a 16-ounce glass (or Boston shaker), place the blueberries, lemon, and rosemary. Muddle these ingredients until juicy. Add ice, bourbon, and maple syrup. Shake until cold and then strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish by putting on the edge of the glass a blueberry with a tiny sprig of rosemary sticking out.

For more bourbon cocktail and food recipes sign up by 1 pm on Friday, May 17 for your chance to win a copy of The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook!