Tag Archives: bourbon cookbook

Classic Kentucky Confections for a Sweet 4th of July

 

The Fourth of July holiday is all-American: bombastic, creative, unique, celebratory, commemorative, joyful, and unconstrained. And what’s more American (or more Kentucky) than apple pie?

Celebrate with new and vintage apple-flavored favorites from some of UPK’s best-loved cookbooks:

Click here to download a PDF of all the recipes to print.

Blue Grass Baked Apple Dumplings


 

Blue Ribbon Apples


 

Bourbon-AppleCrisp


 

Duncan Hine's Apple Pie-2

 

Five Days of Giveaways: It’s a Festive Free-for-all on Friday

We’re in the holiday spirit here at the University Press of Kentucky, and we wanted to share a little of that cheer with our fans. All week we’ve been giving away a new book in a new way to a lucky someone.

We thought we’d close out our #5DaysOfGiveaways with a bang! Or, at the very least, a party… We’re calling it Festive, Free-f0r-all Friday, and here’s how it works:

We’ll be sharing menus and recipes to help you throw the greatest, most Bluegrass-y, Kentucky Holiday Celebration from some of our favorite Kentucky cookbooks. Join in on our fun on any of our social media accounts, and you’ll be automatically entered to win. One lucky fan/follower/subscriber/etc. will win a prize pack of ALL the books we’ve given away this week! Including The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook, a bourbon cocktail book (your choice), Out of Kentucky Kitchens, and The Blue Grass Cook Book, the prize pack will help you host a holiday fit for a Kentucky Colonel.

But what’s a party without a plan? Here are some great holiday menus (new and old) to get the festivities started!

Civil War Recipes Christmas Menu: 9780813120829

  • Boiled Turkey with Oyster Sauce Beet Root
  • Roast Goose with Applesauce
  • [Hot] Cole-Slaw
  • Boiled Ham
  • Turnips
  • Winter Squash
  • Savory Chicken Pie
  • Salsify Cakes
  • Mince Pie
  • Plum Pudding
  • Lemon Custard
  • Cranberry Tart

The Kentucky Fresh CookbookThe Kentucky Fresh Cookbook Christmas Dinner Kentucky Style

  • Roasted Tenderloin of Beef
  • Lemon Parmesan Beans
  • White Cheddar Grits
  • Linen-Napkin Dinner Rolls
  • Endive and Pear Salad with Walnuts
  • Kentucky Blackberry Jam Cake

The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook Christmas Breakfast

  • Blood Orange Ambrosia
  • Shaker Pumpkin Muffins with Walnuts and Flax Seed
  • Country Ham and Green Onion Breakfast Casserole

The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook by Albert SchmidThe Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook All-Bourbon Winter Feast

  • Pork Tenderloin in Spiced Apple Kentucky Bourbon Sauc
  • Kentucky Bourbon Acorn Squash
  • Windsor Mincemeat
  • Kentucky Colonel Bourbon Balls
  • Kentucky Bourbon Bread Pudding with Kentucky Bourbon Sauce

 

Do You Know the Requirements for Bourbon?

1910With a book dedicated solely to cooking with bourbon, it’s only fitting Albert Schmid, author of The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook, would include a little bit of the history behind this beloved beverage.

Most people believe a Baptist minister, the Reverend Elijah Craig, was the first person to distill bourbon, circa 1789. It was a very convenient legend for the forces trying to repeal Prohibition. After all, how bad can bourbon be if it was invented by a Baptist minister? But, the truth is that no one really knows who invented bourbon. Some of the favorite candidates include Evan Williams, James Ritchie, and Wattie Boone (Daniel’s cousin).

Despite the myth surrounding its origin, in 1964 Congress officially named bourbon America’s native spirit and the beverage became the most regulated whiskey in the world, having to meet strict criteria in order to be labeled “bourbon.” The requirements for bourbon are these:

  • Bourbon must be made from at least 51 percent corn mixed with barley and with rye or wheat or both. Many times bourbon has an even higher percentage of corn.
  • Bourbon must be aged in charred new oak barrels.
  • Only pure water may be added to bourbon.
  • Bourbon must not exceed 160 proof off the still or 125 proof going into the barrel.

Bourbon Desserts: The Best of Both Worlds!

Many people think of bourbon as a dessert because of its deliciously sweet taste. But what happens when you actually add bourbon to a dessert? Pure magic. You can take our word for it on this one.

Kentucky Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie with Bourbon Whipped Cream

You might already be familiar with the traditional bourbon desserts that are popular in and around the Bluegrass state. Bourbon Balls, a sinfully delicious candy made with bourbon, chocolate, and pecans, have been a staple of the bourbon-dessert industry for decades.

bourbon balls

For fans of colder treats, Bourbon Ball Ice Cream has become an increasingly popular dessert to many. Keeneland has been adding bourbon to their famous bread pudding for years—and you don’t hear anyone complaining!

Now that we’ve gotten your attention, we’re sure you want to try all of these desserts yourself. Just to ensure that we weren’t making anything up and to do some of your own field research, of course.

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The best place to start your bourbon dessert journey is in UPK’s book Bourbon Desserts by celebrated food writer and home chef, Lynn Marie Hulsman. The title says it all people.

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This book features more than seventy-five decadent desserts using America’s native spirit. Hulsman brings together a collection of confections highlighting the complex flavor notes of Kentucky bourbon, which are sure to delight the senses. Giving readers the confidence to prepare these easy-to-execute desserts, this cookbook also features fun facts about bourbon and its origins as well as tips and tricks for working in the kitchen.

Interested? We know. Keep reading for a never-before-seen recipe from the book!

Sinner’s Chocolate Angel Food Cake

Growing up, I heard lots of talk from my Grandma and the ladies in her front-room, one-chair beauty salon about “reducing.” Apart from cantaloupe and cottage cheese, or half a grapefruit with a maraschino cherry on top, the only virtuous dessert was angel food cake. I never cared for the sticky, Styrofoam redolent packaged concoctions from the supermarket, though. Here’s my twist: A homemade version that actually tastes like wholesome food. Perhaps it’s a little lighter, with fewer calories than some desserts. I don’t really care. I’m after thrills like bourbon and chocolate, and they’re in there. Sinful? You decide.

Makes 1 10-inch x 4-inch angel food cake

1 tablespoon butter, for greasing
3/4 cups all-purpose flour, sifted twice, plus more for flouring
1/2 cup cocoa powder (I like Scharffenberger’s)
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 cup egg whites (from 6 to 7 large or 8 to 9 small eggs), at room temperature
1 tablespoon bourbon

Grease a 10-inch x 4-inch tube pan with butter, dust it with flour, and set it aside.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Sift the flour twice into a large mixing bowl, then measure it into another large mixing bowl.

Add the cocoa to the flour, then sift together three times. Add the cream of tartar, and sift the dry mixture together one more time, then set it aside.

In a separate large mixing bowl, combine the sugar and salt, and sift them together four times, then set the mixture aside.

Using an electric mixer, set to medium-high speed, beat the egg whites until stiff, but not dry, until you have medium-high peaks, about 5 minutes.

Sprinkle on enough of the flour-cocoa mixture to dust the top of the foam without collapsing it, then gently fold it in with a spatula. Alternate with small amounts of the sugar-salt mixture, and continue until all of the dry ingredients are folded into the egg whites.

Add the bourbon to the mixture, and fold in gently using the spatula.

Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan, and bake for 15 minutes at 350 degrees F. After 15 minutes, reduce the heat to 300 degrees F, and bake for 45 more minutes or until a wooden cake tester or metal skewer inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean.

Invert the entire pan onto a wire rack on the countertop, and allow it to cool for two to three hours. Once it’s cool, loosen the cake from the pan using a butter knife, and set it upright on a cake plate.

Store in an airtight plastic cake safe or tin for up to 1 week.


 

If you’re interested in buying the book, you can pre-order it on our website. It’s expected to be released in August of this year! Be sure to check out Hulsman’s website if you can’t get enough of this talented author!

The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook wins prestigious Gourmand World Award

Congratulations to Chef Albert W.A. Schmid! His Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook has won the Gourmand International award for the Wine Category: Best Cooking with Drinks Book. We always knew it was an amazing cookbook, and now the world knows too! For a full list of winners click here.

Pictures from the ceremony in Paris below:

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