Tag Archives: bluegrass

Place Your Bets on These Horse Country Titles from UPK

If you’re anywhere near Kentucky’s Bluegrass region this time of year, you know it is Thoroughbred racing season. The Kentucky Derby may give the state big attention in the spring, but at Lexington’s Keeneland Race Track, the Fall Meet in October is just as popular—and there is hardly anything as beautiful as the region in autumn.

In honor of racing time in the Bluegrass, enjoy one of these great books about horse country:

How Kentucky Became Southern by Mary Jean WallHow Kentucky Became Southern: A Tale of Outlaws, Horse Thieves, Gamblers, and Breeders

by Maryjean Wall

The Kentucky Thoroughbred by Kent HollingsworthThe Kentucky Thoroughbred

by Kent Hollingsworth foreword by Ed Bowen

Kentucky Horse CountryKentucky Horse Country: Images of the Bluegrass

by James Archambeault

Heroes and Horses by Philip ArderyHeroes and Horses: Tales of the Bluegrass

by Philip Ardery

The Prince of Jockeys by Pellom McDaniels IIIThe Prince of Jockeys: The Life of Isaac Burns Murphy

by Pellom McDaniels III

Never Say Die by James C. NicholsonNever Say Die: A Kentucky Colt, the Epsom Derby, and the Rise of the Modern Thoroughbred Industry

by James C. Nicholson foreword by Pete Best

Keeneland's Ted Bassett: My Life  by James E. "Ted" Bassett and Bill Mooney Keeneland’s Ted Bassett: My Life

by James E. “Ted” Bassett and Bill Mooney

Kentucky Fresh highlights the best of the bluegrass with local dishes for all to enjoy

A seasonal food journey with native Kentuckian Maggie Green, The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook takes home chefs through a year in a Kentucky kitchen with more than 200 recipes. With a focus on the cook’s activities in the kitchen, this book guides both aspiring and experienced cooks in the preparation of delicious meals using the delightful variety of foods found in Kentucky.

”Maggie’s recipes are well written and with a friendly, inviting tone that cooks of all abilities and ages will follow with ease and certainly achieve outstanding results. Her menus and recipe titles are enticing and will have broad appeal”–Abby Dodge, author of Desserts 4 Today and The Weekend Baker and expert editor for the 75th Anniversary Edition of the Joy of Cooking

Green appeals to modern tastes using up-to-date, easy to follow recipes and cooking techniques, and she addresses the concerns of contemporary cooks with regard to saving time, promoting good health, and protecting the environment. The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook contains a year’s worth of recipes and menus for everyday meals, holiday events, and special family occasions—all written withKentucky flair.

Upcoming Events with Maggie Green:

Saturday April 30, 2011

What: Signing

When: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Where: The Morris Book Shop, Lexington KY
 
Tuesday May 3, 2011
What: Signing
When: 7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Where: Joseph-Beth Booksellers, Cincinatti OH
 
Thursday May 12, 2011
What: Signing
When: 7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Where: Joseph-Beth Booksellers, Lexington KY
 
Saturday May 14, 2011
What: Signing
When: 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.
Where: Kentucky Haus, Newport KY
 
Saturday May 21, 2011
What: Signing
When: 9 a.m. – 10 a.m.
Where: Lexington Farmers Market, Lexington KY
 
Monday May 23, 2011
What: Talk & Signing
When: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Where: Laurel County Public Library, London KY

Remembering the Civil War, 150 Years Ago Today

 

via The Illinois State Historical Society

via The Kentucky Historical Society

The legacy of the American Civil War (1861 – 1865) is remembered as the war that tore the U.S. apart. On April 12, 1861, Confederate commander P.G.T. Beauregard ordered open fire on Fort Sumter in South Carolina, and the war officially began. Until General Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, the Union forces of the north, and the Confederate forces of the south clashed bitterly on battlegrounds across the country. Even as one of the darker blemishes on American history, the Civil War remains a part of our legacy as a struggle that helped shape our nation as we know it.

Today we commemorate the sesquicentennial, or 150th Anniversary, of the start of the Civil War. As Kentuckians we have always had the unique designation as a border state that declared allegiance to neither the south nor the north, and our geography claims battle sites such as Perryville and Forts Henry and Donelson. Kentucky is also the birthplace of both Civil War presidents Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, Lincoln’s wife Mary Todd, U.S. Vice President and Confederate States’ Secretary of War John C. Breckinridge, and Basil Wilson Duke, who was also the brother-in-law of John Hunt Morgan (not a native Kentuckian, but who made Lexington his home).

President Lincoln recognized the strategic importance of Kentucky during the war, declaring:

“I hope to have God on my side, but I must have Kentucky.”

If Civil War history is your thing, or you’d like to celebrate the sesquicentennial by learning a little bit more, The University Press of Kentucky wants to feed your interest with books, maps, photos, and a little help from our friends.

  • The Kentucky Historical Society has lots of Civil War happenings and projects you can check out here. And links to their news and events surrounding the sesquicentennial here.
  • KET has some wonderful educational overviews of the Civil War in Kentucky, including timelines, maps, and speeches.
  • The Library of Congress was recently gifted with the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs which features ‘more than 700 ambrotype and tintype photographs [that] highlight both Union and Confederate soldiers during the American Civil War’. Spend a few minutes flipping through, the quality and detail are incredible!
Unidentified African American Union soldier with a rifle and revolver in front of painted backdrop showing weapons and   American flag at Benton Barracks, Saint Louis, Missouri. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, http://www.loc.gov
  • Though its not ENTIRELY Civil War related, The University of Louisville has an extensive collection of historic Kentucky maps, digitized for your easy perusal. Including this Civil War-era map of Louisville and its defenses.
  • University Press of Kentucky author Rusty Williams (My Old Confederate Home) maintains a blog of the same name, highlighting stories from Confederate soldiers’ homes.
  • And of course, The University Press of Kentucky has a substantial list of Civil War reading, inluding:

The Virginia at War Series

One of Morgan’s Men: Memoirs of Lieutenant John M. Porter of the Ninth Kentucky Cavalry


Kentuckians in Gray: Confederate Generals and Field Officers of the Bluegrass State


Perryville: This Grand Havoc of Battle

For more UPK Civil War Titles see below, or visit www.kentuckypress.com

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