Tag Archives: bluegrass

Kentucky Basketball Legends: Still Making Their Mark

Members of the 1998 Kentucky Men’s Basketball Championship team will sign Maker’s Mark annual commemorative bottles at the Keeneland Entertainment Center this Friday, April 13, at 7 a.m. Among those signing at the event will be forward guard Allen Edwards, guard Jeff Sheppard, and former UK head coach Tubby Smith, all of whom are featured in Wildcat Memories: Inside Stories from Kentucky Basketball Greats. In this book, author Doug Brunk details the cherished bond between Kentucky basketball and the citizens of the Commonwealth through first-hand accounts from some of the Wildcats’ most renowned legends.

Tickets for the Maker’s Mark signing are already sold out, but you still have a chance to get up close and personal with these champions by way of this engrossing book. Below is an excerpt of Coach Tubby Smith’s chapter from Wildcat Memories:


As a coach, you love the fans, and you want their support. Having an affinity for the fan base is essential. You are providing a service coaching their team. You are trying to win, and you are trying to do the right things for your players, your coaches, the university, and the fans. Fans may boo you or cheer you. They call and they write with praise and criticism. But you can’t let that affect you, or you’re not going to last long in coaching or be successful in coaching. I became a college coach for the student-athletes, to get them educated and to teach them the game of basketball.

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During his ten-year tenure, Tubby Smith guided UK to one national championship, five SEC Tournament titles, and six Sweet Sixteen finishes. (Courtesy of Victoria Graff.)

During my tenure at UK there was an element of the fan base that didn’t think our teams had won enough games, but in five of my ten years as coach we probably played the toughest schedule in the history of UK basketball. I wish we could have won more games while I was head coach. But we were competitive, we graduated our players, and we kept the program clean. If there was pressure, it was pressure to make sure we did things in a first-class manner. 

One thing I appreciate about UK fans is that they know how to be grateful, because the program has been so successful , and the fans are proud of that success. They show their pride, and they should. They show their commitment by calling in to talk shows, writing letters, and flocking to Rupp Arena or wherever the team plays. You’re not going to find more loyal, passionate fans for their team than followers of the Wildcats. That’s the one common thing. Just about everybody in Kentucky is pulling for you to be successful. It’s a way of life in the Commonwealth. 

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The Perfect Kentucky Derby Party

Plan Perfect Derby Party

Like the big race itself, Kentucky Derby parties never go out of style. This post was originally published on our blog on May 2, 2015:

Of the many traditions that go hand-in-hand with the Kentucky Derby—the hat, the silks, the roses, the singing of “My Old Kentucky Home”—hosting a Derby party can be the most fun, especially for those who can’t make it to Churchill Down; but it can also be the most stressful. If you’re looking to throw the perfect Derby party, look no further than the recipes, decor, and ideas below. If you’re looking for something printable, download a PDF here: Plan the perfect KENTUCKY DERBY PARTY.

The Space:

tissue paper roses DIYRoses, roses everywhere! Run to the florist, or fake it up with red tissue paper to celebrate the Run for the Roses. Plus, its easy to coordinate with red plates and dinnerware. Set up a photo station with your own blanket of roses covering a blank stretch of wall. It only takes three things: thin wire, a cheap shower curtain, and plenty of red tissue paper. Here’s a great how-to from Brit and Co.

Fun & Festive:

It’s not a party without party games! Here are a few of our favorites to keep the good times going until the call to the post:

  • Bring the Derby to the Derby party! Place the names of the horses (or the numbers 1 -20) on folded slips of paper into a hat (bonus points for using a derby hat!) Guests can draw the number of the horse they’re rooting for in the big race. Make sure to have a fantastic prize for the winner, maybe an extra Race-Day Pie to take home?
  • The weather is (almost) always beautiful the first weekend in May. Horseshoes and/or Corn Hole move the party outdoors into the yard, putting Derby hats to good use under the sun.
  • Speaking of Derby hats, why not have a contest to see who has the best Derby hat? The men are invited too!
  • And lastly, an idea from KentuckyDerby.com: Ice Cube Jockey Races. Freeze small jockeys (or any differently colored or shaped tokens) to the tops of ice cubes. At the start of the race all participants can wager on a horse. Take a flat, smooth surface (glass from a large picture frame, an over-the-door bathroom mirror, etc.) and lay it across a table at an angle. Line the ice cube jockeys up, keeping them in place with a yard stick and then let them loose all at once for a fun and crazy race. To repeat simply refreeze the jockeys on new ice cubes and freeze until the down time between the next races.

The Drinks:

C’mon, this one’s obvious: mint juleps all around! Easy to prep and easy to serve, you really can’t go wrong with the most traditional of traditions; it’s a classic for a reason. Perfect MINT JULEP For the younger partiers, the designated drivers, and those who might not be bourbon fans (it’s OK, we forgive them), you can’t go wrong with a non-alcoholic sparkler. You can even reuse your mint-infused simple syrup for extra flavor. Derby Sparkler Drink

The Food:

Origin stories differ greatly, but burgoo has definitely evolved into a delicious “catch-all” stew. Basically, you can’t go wrong throwing everything you’ve “caught” into a giant pot and letting it simmer until ready. But if you’re looking for a specific recipe, The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook by nutritionist Maggie Green, has great ingredients and an easy, one-pot method.

Kentucky Fresh Burgoo

For small-bites, try Maggie Green’s steamed asparagus or green beans with toasted sesame mayonnaise:

Trim the asparagus and/or green beans and steam until bright green and tender (but still a little crisp). To make the toasted sesame mayonnaise dipping sauce, whisk 1 cup mayonnaise, juice of 1/2 lemon, 3 tablespoons dark sesame seed oil, 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Serve on the side as a dipping sauce, or thin with a bit more lemon juice and drizzle it over the veggies.

Sweet Treats:

Race-Day Pie, Saturday-in-May Pie, Bluegrass Pie…whatever you call it, the trademarked treat with bourbon, chocolate, and pecans in a pie crust is a must-have on the first Saturday of May.

In Bourbon Desserts, Lynn Marie Hulsman offers up the recipe for her Grandma Rose’s Big Race Pie. If you want to go really Kentucky, snag your flour from Weisenberger Mill, your pecans from Hickman, Kentucky, and your chocolate from Ruth Hunt Candies (or your favorite, local chocolatier).

Bourbon Desserts Derby Pie

Five Days of Giveaways: It’s a Festive Free-for-all on Friday

We’re in the holiday spirit here at the University Press of Kentucky, and we wanted to share a little of that cheer with our fans. All week we’ve been giving away a new book in a new way to a lucky someone.

We thought we’d close out our #5DaysOfGiveaways with a bang! Or, at the very least, a party… We’re calling it Festive, Free-f0r-all Friday, and here’s how it works:

We’ll be sharing menus and recipes to help you throw the greatest, most Bluegrass-y, Kentucky Holiday Celebration from some of our favorite Kentucky cookbooks. Join in on our fun on any of our social media accounts, and you’ll be automatically entered to win. One lucky fan/follower/subscriber/etc. will win a prize pack of ALL the books we’ve given away this week! Including The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook, a bourbon cocktail book (your choice), Out of Kentucky Kitchens, and The Blue Grass Cook Book, the prize pack will help you host a holiday fit for a Kentucky Colonel.

But what’s a party without a plan? Here are some great holiday menus (new and old) to get the festivities started!

Civil War Recipes Christmas Menu: 9780813120829

  • Boiled Turkey with Oyster Sauce Beet Root
  • Roast Goose with Applesauce
  • [Hot] Cole-Slaw
  • Boiled Ham
  • Turnips
  • Winter Squash
  • Savory Chicken Pie
  • Salsify Cakes
  • Mince Pie
  • Plum Pudding
  • Lemon Custard
  • Cranberry Tart

The Kentucky Fresh CookbookThe Kentucky Fresh Cookbook Christmas Dinner Kentucky Style

  • Roasted Tenderloin of Beef
  • Lemon Parmesan Beans
  • White Cheddar Grits
  • Linen-Napkin Dinner Rolls
  • Endive and Pear Salad with Walnuts
  • Kentucky Blackberry Jam Cake

The Kentucky Fresh Cookbook Christmas Breakfast

  • Blood Orange Ambrosia
  • Shaker Pumpkin Muffins with Walnuts and Flax Seed
  • Country Ham and Green Onion Breakfast Casserole

The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook by Albert SchmidThe Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook All-Bourbon Winter Feast

  • Pork Tenderloin in Spiced Apple Kentucky Bourbon Sauc
  • Kentucky Bourbon Acorn Squash
  • Windsor Mincemeat
  • Kentucky Colonel Bourbon Balls
  • Kentucky Bourbon Bread Pudding with Kentucky Bourbon Sauce

 

Five Days of Giveaways: Classic Kentucky Cooking on #Throwback Thursday

004_InstagramWe’re in the holiday spirit here at the University Press of Kentucky, and we wanted to share a little of that cheer with our fans. All week we’ll be giving away a new book in a new way to a lucky someone.

Today is Throwback Thursday (#TBT) and we’re giving away a copy of The Blue Grass Cook Book to one of our fans on Instagram or Twitter. We’ll be sharing menus and recipes from the book (and a few other classic Kentucky cookbooks) all day. All of our new Instagram and Twitter followers, photo likes, comments, retweets, and mentions will be automatically entered to win.

To whet your appetite, enjoy Mrs. Garrad’s “Kentucky Burgout” from The Blue Grass Cook Book, and the original book review from the New York Times in 1904!

Kentucky Burgout

Mrs. Garrad, Bourbon County, Kentucky

  • 6 squirrels
  • 6 birds
  • 1 1/2 gallons of water
  • 1 teacup of pearl barley
  • 1 quart of tomatoes
  • 1 quart of corn
  • 1 quart of oysters
  • 1 pint of sweet cream
  • 1/4 pound of butter
  • 2 tablespoons of flour
  • Season to taste

Boil the squirrels and birds in the water till tender and remove all the bones. Add barley and vegetables and cook slowly for 1 hour. Ten minutes before serving add the oysters and cream with butter and flour rubbed together. Season and serve hot.

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Stop Two: St. Joe’s Oak

Happy first day of fall everyone! Considering this is one of the most beautiful times of the year due to the progression of tree leaves through many vibrant colors, we decided to make a pit stop on our Journey Through the Bluegrass road trip at one of Kentucky’s most historic trees: St. Joe’s Oak.

St. Joe’s Oak has an undocumented and impressive history in the bluegrass. Today, the tree can be found inside the parking structure at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Lexington, KY, but it has presumably been here since before Lexington was even founded. When St. Joe’s was originally built, there was much talk of tearing down the amiable arbor, however, the contractors could just not bring themselves to obstruct such a beautiful and historic site. Now a monument in the center of the St. Joseph’s parking structure, this giant oak still stands proud for all to look upon. If you want to make a pit stop to gaze upon this beauty, you may find it at One Saint Joseph Drive, Lexington, KY 40504.

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A photograph of St. Joe’s Oak in front of the newly build St. Joseph’s Hospital.

If you want to learn more about St. Joe’s Oak and other venerable trees of the bluegrass, check out our recently published book, Venerable Trees: History, Biology, and Conversation in the Bluegrass by Tom Kimmerer. Featuring more than one hundred color photographs, this beautifully illustrated book offers guidelines for conserving ancient trees worldwide while educating readers about their life cycle. Venerable Trees is an informative call to understand the challenges faced by the companions so deeply rooted in the region’s heritage and a passionate plea for their preservation.

And, bonus! We are actually giving away a copy of this book in honor of it being the first day of autumn, so happy fall, y’all! If you want to sign up for our book giveaway, click here! The sign ups will be active until the end of the day on Sunday, September 27, so don’t miss out!

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Come Take a Journey through the Bluegrass with us!

Journey Through the Bluegrass cut

This week, the crew here at the press is kicking off a series titled “Journey Through the Bluegrass”!! We gave you a taste of bourbon country last week, but there’s so much more to Kentucky than just bourbon, basketball, and barbecues. We’re going to be taking you on a tour through some of the Bluegrass State’s finest locations and moments in history. Here’s a sneak preview of some of the books we’ll be talking about this week:

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lastgreatplaces

KENTUCKY’S LAST GREAT PLACES
Thomas G. Barnes

“This isn’t a memorial to lost places; it’s a call to action, a reminder to readers of what exactly there is to lose if economic development continues to take precedence over the environment in both social and political arenas.”

Back Home in Kentucky

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KENTUCKY’S NATURAL HERITAGE: AN ILLUSTRATED GUIDE TO BIODIVERSITY
Greg Abernathy, Deborah White, Ellis L. Laudermilk, and Mark Evans

Richly detailed and lavishly illustrated with more than 250 color photos, maps, and charts, Kentucky’s Natural Heritage is the definitive compendium of the commonwealth’s amazing diversity. It celebrates the natural beauty of some of the most important ecosystems in the nation and presents a compelling case for the necessity of conservation.

naturalheritage
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KimmererCompF.indd

VENERABLE TREES: HISTORY, BIOLOGY, AND COVERVATION IN THE BLUEGRASS
Tom Kimmerer

Featuring more than one hundred color photographs, this beautifully illustrated book offers guidelines for conserving ancient trees worldwide while educating readers about their life cycle. Venerable Trees is an informative call to understand the challenges faced by the companions so deeply rooted in the region’s heritage and a passionate plea for their preservation.

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One last thing! We’ve compiled the perfect playlist to accompany you on your trip this week! The playlist has been left open to the public, so if you feel like there is something missing, please add it! We would love to see what you guys are listening to on this awesome adventure!

playlist cover

If you want to add something to the playlist, click here!

#UPWeek The Importance of Regional Publishing: Because Nobody Understands Kentucky Like We Do

UPWeek_KY
All week, we’ve been celebrating University Press Week and sharing with all of you what it means to be a University Press and what makes UPs so great. One of the subjects we’re best known for is a subject closest to all of our hearts: Kentucky. Our regional books editor, Ashley Runyon, is a born-and-bred Bluegrass Girl. For University Press Week, we asked her to share why Regional Publishing is so important both to her and to the Press. Herewith, Ashley’s take on UPK’s regional publishing program, and a few reasons why we love our state.

Kentucky is home. As a toddler, I was first pictured in my University of Kentucky Wildcats cheerleading outfit rooting for the Big Blue. But the Bluegrass State is more than just basketball. Or bourbon. Or horses. It is the experiences and stories of people and places throughout the region that define what makes Kentucky great.

As a publisher of regional books, we are in a unique position to offer an exciting and inviting look at Kentucky’s history, heritage, and community. Offering more than just a chronicle of Kentucky’s past, we have the opportunity to engage, enlighten, and entertain. In the past year alone, we have shown Kentuckians the best places in the state to travel to for barbecue, bourbon, gems, and ghosts, revealed one of the best but forgotten jockeys, taught our readers how to make the perfect Old Fashioned cocktail, and offered a comprehensive look at the inner workings of government and politics in Frankfort and beyond. The tradition of the Bluegrass State is wide and far-reaching. Every week I learn something new about my home state and I hope we also offer that to our readers.

Regional publishing showcases the many truths of our region and community, whether it be The Good: A vibrant writing community, love and appreciation of the land. The Bad: The Louisville Cardinals (Go Big Blue!). And the Ugly: Poverty, prevalent drugs, and a poor education system. It is our job to tell the stories of our state.

The heritage of Kentucky is rich and it has been our privilege to enrich our community for the past 70 years.

Why do we publish books about Kentucky? …Because nobody understands Kentucky like we do.

Because we love that there are more barrels of bourbon than people in Kentucky.

More Bourbon Barrels than People

And we love to drink it! (even our beer tastes like bourbon)

Bourbonbarrelron-swanson-drunk-gif

Because it is perfectly acceptable to call into work to go bet on the horses at Keeneland or Churchill Downs

I'mSick

Because NOBODY is a bigger basketball fan than we are. (We still can’t believe the UK-UL game in the 2012 Final Four didn’t result in the apocalypse)

UKULFinal4

Because speaking of the apocalypse…Berea, Kentucky is the safest place to be

Zombies Ahead

Because in Kentucky, you can visit Paris, Rome, Bagdad, Bethlehem, Cuba, Sweeden, London, and Versailles (pronounced Ver-sales) in a day. Or towns like Monkey’s Eyebrow, Possum Trot, Big Bone Lick, Bugtussle, Oddville, Rabbit Hash, Shoulderblade, or Pig.

AroundtheWorld_KYMap Unique_Towns_Map

Because we know its Loo-uh-vuhl, not Louie-vill

loouhvuhl

Because one-half of the most infamous feud in America were Kentuckians

Because we were the original Land of Lincoln (sorry Illinois!)

LincolnLicense

Because along with Lincoln, we claim Muhammed Ali, George Clooney (all the Clooneys, really), Johnny Depp, Jennifer Lawrence, Diane Sawyer, and a hell of a lot more writers (Robert Penn Warren), Politicians (Henry Clay), Musicians (including the Judd family and 2/5 of the Backstreet Boys), Scientists (Robert H. Grubbs), Athletes (Tyson Gay), Artists (John James Audobon), and Chicken Impresarios (Col. Harlan Sanders)

George Clooney

Because we’re well-fed on BBQ, fried chicken, and doughnuts

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Because even our madams are (in)famous

BelleBrezing BelleWatling

Because its hard not to tear up every time this happens before the Kentucky Derby

Because, as former Governor Happy Chandler said, I Never Met A Kentuckian Who Wasn’t Either Thinking About Going Home Or Actually Going Home.”

my-old-kentucky-home-poster_dribble