Tag Archives: Appalachia

UPK Partners with Hindman to Launch Fireside Industries

As we at the University Press of Kentucky continue to commemorate 75 years of serving the commonwealth and celebrating Kentucky writers, we are thrilled to announce the formation of a novel venture.  We have partnered with the Hindman Settlement School to launch an imprint, Fireside Industries. Its purpose is to provide stability to the Appalachian literary tradition by publishing new works and reissues of classics that greatly contribute to the region.

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First edition print of  The Quare Women

As the publisher of a number of groundbreaking works about—and for—Appalachia, one of our goals is to place Appalachian dynamics in the context of global change and to show why place-based and regional studies still matter. Our series Place Matters: New Directions in Appalachian Studies explores the history, social life, and cultures of Appalachia from multidisciplinary, comparative, and international perspectives. Our topics of interest range from diversity and social inequalities to geography and political economy—from efforts to confront regional stereotypes to literature, the arts, and the ongoing social construction and re-imagination of Appalachia. We are pleased to join with Hindman Settlement School to encourage, support, and nurture the diverse and rich voices of Appalachia.

The first two titles of Fireside Industries will be a reissue of Lucy Furman’s The Quare Women and a release of Tanya Amyx Berry’s first book, For the Hog Killing, 1979. Look for these titles next year. Click here to read more about this exciting new partnership.

 

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Wendell Berry Quote

Photo via University of Kentucky Libraries

A Wendell Berry Reading List:

Singing the Summer Southern Harmony

There’s something about music during the summertime—outdoor concerts, guitar-playing on the porch, festivals across the globe. One of the oldest and most popular southern singing traditions is that of “Shape Notes.”

Shape notes have been in use by classrooms and congregations for more than two centuries, and arose to simplify the notation, teaching, and arrangement of songs. Rather than traditional musical notation heads, shapes are substituted that correspond to different sounds:

Do Re Mi Fa So La Ti Do

William Walker’s Southern Harmony and Musical Companion was first published in 1835. During the nineteenth century, when advertising was mainly by word of mouth or relatively sedate ads in weekly and monthly papers and pamphlets, Southern Harmony sold about 600,000 copies, and is perhaps the most popular songbook ever printed.

9780813118598 As far as is known, Benton, Kentucky, is the only place where the Southern Harmony is still used regularly. The Big Singing, usually held on the fourth Sunday in May, has been an annual event since 1884. Before World War II it is said that many thousands attended; as many as four extra trains in each direction were added to bring in the crowds.

 

Preface to the 1835 edition:

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The CD included with Southern Harmony and Musical Companion contains more than 300 tunes, hymns, psalms, odes, and anthems, including “New Britain (Amazing Grace),” “Happy Land,” “O Come, Come Away,” “Wondrous Love,” and many, many more. The recordings were made at the Big Singing in Benton, Kentucky, between 1966 and 1992. We’ve included two of the more popular tunes, “New Britain” and “Newburgh” below.

Gems of the Backlist: ‘The Appalachian Photographs of Earl Palmer’

Here at the University Press of Kentucky, we recently completed an initiative to digitize all of the books that we’ve published since our founding in 1943. It was a lot of work going through more than 1300 books, but it’s been a process full of fun surprises and astounding discoveries. Best of all, every now and then, there was a book that we just couldn’t put down—a book so good we just can’t resist sharing it with you again:

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“Palmer has given us the best view we will ever have of life and work in the Southern Appalachians. . . . His magnificent collection of photographs preserves the old way of life for us to study and ponder.”—Harry Caudill, author of Night Comes to the Cumberlands

For more than fifty years, mountain-born Earl Palmer traveled the Southern Appalachians with his camera, recording his personal vision of the mountain people and their heritage. Over these year he created, in several thousand photographs, a distinctive body of work that affirms a traditional image of Appalachia—a region of great natural beauty inhabited by a self-sufficient people whose lives are notable for simplicity and harmony.

 The Appalachian Photographs of Earl Palmer collects more than 120 representative photographs from the photographer’s collection. Jean Haskell Speer, who was emerita director of the Appalachian Studies Program at Virginia Tech, conducted extensive interviews with Palmer to write a biographical and critical commentary. Palmer’s photographs, Speer argues, are significant cultural statements that depict not so much a geographical region as a particular idea of Appalachia.

from the preface by Jean Haskell Speer:

“Earl has spent a lifetime, as he puts it, “conjuring” Appalachia, creating a rich and complex Appalachian vision in pictures. He believes the highest and best vision of Appalachia is rooted in its past, made manifest in its traditional culture and in those persons who remain emblems of the past in the present. In fact, Earl’s photographs may be said to constitute a kind of mountain manifesto, a public declaration of his intention to create a particular Appalachian world.

Earl has photographed Appalachia according to his world view. He has seen the mountaineer as both historically real and eternally mythic. He has made a photographic record of what has been real, if now only remembered, and he has created a vision of Appalachia’s past as he wishes it to be remembered. Earl has understood the power of the photographic image to preserve and to persuade, especially to build a rhetorically powerful argument through repeated and consistent images.

The photographs chosen for this volume from Earl’s collection of twenty to thirty thousand negatives represent the mainstream of his work. They include some of his most critically acclaimed and popular photographs, some historically and culturally valuable photographs, and photographs that illustrate Earl’s concept of “Appalachianness.” The photographs were made over a period of more than fifty years from 1936 to 1988. Geographically, they represent the heartland of Southern Appalachia, covering portions of Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina. . . .

For most of his photographs Earl writes extensive captions that are intended to be evocative more often than informational. They are narratives that mix historical fact with Earl’s imagination in short vignettes about mountain life.”

We’ve selected a few photos to share here, but many more await in The Appalachian Photographs of Earl Palmer.

click the images to view full-size.

“Tell Me, [about] Mommy Goose”

Raccoon_Car_WmkdThe 82-year-old renowned folk artist Minnie Adkins usually sits in her easy chair at her home in Elliott County and whittles. “Folk art is from the heart,” she recently told Rich Copley for The Lexington Herald-Leader. “Fine art is from the knowledge. Folk art you make from what you love and what you want to create.”

Mike Norris, former Communications director at Centre College, is a musician with a flair for rhymes.

Together they’ve created the charming new children’s book, Mommy Goose, featuring fifty original Appalachian rhymes by Norris and more than one hundred new hand-carved and -painted works by Adkins.

With colorful characters like the Speckled Hen, June Bug, and Clete, the Parakeet, the Song_Buttonnursery rhymes and carvings in Mommy Goose honor Appalachian tradition and speech. Accompanying the rhymes is a new original song and sheet music by Norris, “Tell Me, Mommy Goose.”

 

Mommy Goose_smallAbout MOMMY GOOSE

Mommy Goose is an Appalachian bird.

Like cows love corn, she loves words.

She says,

“Corn can be yellow, blue, or white,

And words change colors in different light.

To talk like your flock is no disgrace.

Just use the right word in the right place.”


Read the feature on Adkins and Norris in the latest issue of Kentucky Monthly, or buy the book.

inthisissueMommy Goose final front coverREV.indd

Galley Giveaway: Let’s Get Fictional #1

UKY01 Birds of Opulence Selected.inddAs our fans and followers may have noticed, we have some exciting works of fiction due out this Spring. We’ve had the pleasure of working on them for months now, waiting for this moment—the time when we finally get to share them with you!

From now through 5:00 pm Eastern on Wednesday, January 13, enter for a chance to win one of five available advance reader copies of The Birds of Opulence by Crystal Wilkinson. Fill out the form below to enter our contest and read this compelling tour de force before it’s published next month.

Also, click “read more” below to enjoy the first chapter of the work that Pulitzer Prize finalist Maurice Manning has called “lyrical and visionary, unconventional, and infused with beauty.”

Continue reading

At Year’s End

LyonCvrCompFinal2.inddIt’s the darkest time of year when the days are longest;  and, more and more, all of us here at the University Press of Kentucky are finding ourselves curled up with a book of an evening.

Perusing A Kentucky Christmas, our Marketing and Sales Director (Amy) was struck again by the late, great James Still’s classic poem “At Year’s End.” Even after twenty years, something about this poem speaks to us during this season. Here it is just as it appears in A Kentucky Christmas with Still’s own special inscription:

At_Years_End