Tag Archives: air force

Giveaway Spotlight – BIPLANES AT WAR

Johnson CoverWe’re giving a book away this week! One lucky reader will win a book of their choice, choosing from seven of our newest titles. From now until Sunday, July 21, we will spotlight one of the books up for grabs on our blog. Answer our questions in the comments or on social media, and you’ll be entered into the drawing! For more details on the giveaway, CLICK HERE

Today’s feature title is Biplanes at War: US Marine Corps Aviation in the Small Wars Era, 1915-1934. Unlike the relative uniformity of conventional warfare, small wars prevent a clear definition of rules and roles for military forces to follow. During the small wars era, the US military had only recently begun battling in the skies but recognized the unique value and flexibility of aviation. This book provides a riveting history of the Marines’ use of biplanes between the world wars in Haiti, the Dominican Republic, China, and Nicaragua and chronicles how the Marines used aircraft to provide supporting fire to ground troops, to evacuate the wounded, to transport cargo, and even to support democratic elections. Biplanes at War sheds light on how the Marines pioneered roles that have become commonplace for air forces today, an accomplishment that has largely gone unrecognized in mainstream histories of aviation.


Apart from their military and transportation usefulness, airplanes are also pretty cool to look at. We hope you enjoy this slideshow of early biplanes featured in the book!

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If you had to hop in one of these planes right now and fly across the Atlantic, would you trust them? Which of the planes above would you trust the most? Let us know in the comments and you’ll be entered to win Biplanes at War: US Marine Corps Aviation in the Small Wars Era, 1915-1934 or another book of your choice from seven of our newest titles.

CLICK HERE for giveaway details

CLICK HERE to learn more or to order Biplanes at War: US Marine Corps Aviation in the Small Wars Era, 1915-1934

Press Play: Bourbon Desserts, The Air Force, and Remembering Emmett Till

This past Friday, August 29, the Wall Street Journal featured a review of Lynn Marie Hulsman’s Bourbon Desserts. Here’s a taste of what they had to say:

“Bourbon, compared with its older cousin, Scotch, has a hint of caramel sweetness to it, making it a natural flavoring agent for dessert. Ms. Hulsman’s recipes for cakes, cookies, custards, ice creams and other confections are not designed for the calorie-shy, but they may well enchant anyone with a sweet tooth and an interest in traditional and modern American cuisine. Her presentations are clear and concise, with short introductory paragraphs preceding her instructions.” —Wall Street Journal


For the past couple of weeks Robert M. Farley’s Grounded: The Case for Abolishing the United States Air Force has been stirring up some conversation in publications like Aviation Week and The Daily Beast as readers digest Farley’s thought-provoking book.

Farley himself has continued to contribute to that conversation writing recently in Real Clear Defense about the Air Force’s new strategic white paper:

“Addressed to ‘Airmen and Airpower Advocates,’ America’s Air Force: A Call to the Future sounds a lot of familiar notes. It hypes the concept of “strategic agility,” a worthy contribution, but ends up defining the service’s contribution in reactive terms.  A Call to the Future tackles procurement failures and speaks to the need for partnerships, but fails to contribute seriously to the most gripping procurement problem the Air Force currently faces – the F-35 – or to provide a framework for thinking about the failure of airpower partnerships in Iraq and Afghanistan.” —Real Clear Defense


Finally, Darryl Mace, author of In Remembrance of Emmett Till: Regional Stories and Media Responses to the Black Freedom Struggle, spoke with radio station WHYY to remember Emmett Till on the 59th anniversary of his murder. During their conversation, Mace compares the the media landscape when Till was killed with the one we face today:

It is a very different time. There is a desire for instant news. Everything is tweeted and everything is blogged. The 24-hour news cycle really makes people hungry to consume media… You can’t escape the media input now.

You can listen to Darryl Mace’s full interview on the subject matter at WHYY.