Category Archives: Uncategorized

Women of Rock Wednesday!

Today’s post is about – you guessed it – women who are rock musicians!


Today when we think of rock musicians we mostly think of men: Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain, The Beatles, Bob Dylan, etc. How often do we actually think of women in the rock industry? Sure, there’s Janis Joplin and Courtney Love, but can we think of any women rock musicians from the past decade or so?

The truth is, some women just don’t want to be put in the spotlight, or they don’t want the criticism that comes with it. In one of our books, Girls Rock! Fifty Years of Women Making Music by Mina Carson, Tisa Lewis, and Susan M. Shaw, these women discuss how difficult it can be to be a female rock musician in this day and age. Caron, Lewis, and Shaw talk all facets of the industry – the image, the business, the production. They also share some truly inspiring and surprising stories – some their own and some from other famous female rock musicians. All in all, these women combine their own feminist twist to this truly eye-opening book filled with history and ideas you won’t want to miss.

In a comment below, tell us who your favorite women rockstars are!

Girls Rock! is available for purchase here.

2015 Kentucky Writer’s Hall of Fame

Next week, the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning in downtown Lexington will hold the third annual induction of the Kentucky Writer’s Hall of Fame. The Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame was created to recognize Kentucky writers whose work reflects the character and culture of our commonwealth, and to educate Kentuckians about our state’s rich literary heritage.

The requirements for the 2015 class have altered slightly from years past. For a writer to have been eligible this year, they must be (1) deceased (excluding one living writer), (2) published, (3) someone whose writing is of enduring stature, and (4) someone connected in a significant way to the Commonwealth of Kentucky. In order to be nominated, each author had to undergo a three step process including nominations from the general public, recommendations from a committee comprised of former state poet laureates and the director of the Kentucky Arts council, and a final review and selection done by the Carnegie Center’s Hall of Fame Creation Committee.

This year’s inductees have been described as “eloquent, inspirational, and sometimes downright outrageous” by the Hall of Fame founder and Carnegie Center executive director, Neil Chethik. The full 2015 class is listed below:

      
Wendell Berry (Henry Co.)      Elizabeth Hardwick (Fayette Co.)      Effie Waller Smith (Pike Co.)

     
Jim Wayne Miller (Warren Co.)   Guy Davenport (Fayette Co.)  Hunter S. Thompson (Jefferson Co.)

The University Press of Kentucky proudly honors these authors, having worked with many of them at some point in their career. A small spotlight will go out to UPK book, Every Leaf a Mirror: a Jim Wayne Miller Reader, with a short reading by Mary Ellen Miller, Jim Wayne’s widow, during the ceremony.

The six winners will be officially inducted on Wednesday, January 28, at the Carnegie Center, 7 PM (Doors open at 6:30 PM). This event is FREE and open to the public.To get in the spirit of the induction, here is a poem from Every Leaf a Mirror titled “His Hands”:

His Hands
He noticed his hands, how they
cracked each other’s knuckles, how his fingers
thrummed restlessly on every tabletop,
foraging for magazines, snuffling about
in his pockets for cigarettes, like a dog
tracking a mole. He noticed his hands
reassuring one another, noticed them
turning on television sets when he wasn’t looking,
like horses who learn to open
gates and barn doors with their noses.

He knew his hands had learned from him
how to seem independent, how to hide
from the larger creature they were just a part of.
His hands were only children
telling on the street what they’d heard at home.

He walked in the woods.
Fish hung in his veins, shadows fanning.
Birds circled his farthest green thoughts.

He came home after dark, the mood following
like a friendly old dog. At home he noticed
his hands, alert, looking up, trying
to start a game of fetch.

Merry Giftmas!

It’s everyone’s favorite time of year again! We are already knee-deep in the Christmas season, and yet there are still so many gifts to be bought. Instead of stuffing your loved-ones stockings with gift cards and candy, check out these awesome UPK books for a creative gift option that everybody in the family is sure to love. The best part is, if you order them through our website now through February 1st, 2015, you will receive 20% off just by entering the codes “FHOL” or “FSNO”. Happy gift-giving!

For the veteran: Grounded by Robert M. Farley

 

The United States needs airpower, but does it need an air force? In Grounded, Robert M. Farley persuasively argues that America should end the independence of the United States Air Force (USAF) and divide its assets and missions between the United States Army and the United States Navy.

 

For the history buff: Madam Belle by Maryjean Wall

Belle Brezing made a major career move when she stepped off the streets of Lexington, Kentucky, and into Jennie Hill’s bawdy house—an upscale brothel run out of a former residence of Mary Todd Lincoln. At nineteen, Brezing was already infamous as a youth steeped in death, sex, drugs, and scandal. But it was in Miss Hill’s “respectable” establishment that she began to acquire the skills, manners, and business contacts that allowed her to ascend to power and influence as an internationally known madam.

 

For the feminist: Violence against Women in Kentucky  by Carol E. Jordan

For more than two centuries, Kentucky women have fought for the right to vote, own property, control their wages, and be safe at home and in the workplace. Tragically, many of these women’s voices have been silenced by abuse and violence. In Violence against Women in Kentucky: A History of U.S. and State Legislative Reform, Carol E. Jordan chronicles the stories of those who have led the legislative fight for the last four decades to protect women from domestic violence, rape, stalking, and related crimes.

 

 

For the movie-goer: The Philosophy of Tim Burton edited by Jennifer L. McMahon

Director and producer Tim Burton impresses audiences with stunning visuals, sinister fantasy worlds, and characters whose personalities are strange and yet familiar. Drawing inspiration from sources as varied as Lewis Carroll, Salvador Dalí, Washington Irving, and Dr. Seuss, Burton’s creations frequently elicit both alarm and wonder. Whether crafting an offbeat animated feature, a box-office hit, a collection of short fiction, or an art exhibition, Burton pushes the envelope, and he has emerged as a powerful force in contemporary popular culture.

For the poet: Many-Storied House by George Ella Lyon

 

Born in the small, eastern Kentucky coal-mining town of Harlan, George Ella Lyon began her career with Mountain, a chapbook of poems. She has since published many more books in multiple genres and for readers of all ages, but poetry remains at the heart of her work. Many-Storied House is her fifth collection.

 

For the UK fan: Wildcat Memories by Doug Brunk

Wildcat Memories illuminates the intimate connection between the UK basketball program and the commonwealth. Author Doug Brunk brings together some of the program’s greatest coaches, players, and personalities to reflect on Kentuckians who provided inspiration, guidance, and moral support during their tenure as Wildcats. Featuring personal essays and behind-the-scenes stories from Kentucky legends Wallace “Wah Wah” Jones, Dan Issel, Joe B. Hall, Kyle Macy, and Tubby Smith, as well as newcomers Patrick Patterson, Darius Miller, and John Wall, this heartfelt collection shares an inside look at what makes UK basketball extraordinary.

For the chef: The Duncan Hines trilogy
Duncan Hines: How a Traveling Salesman Became the Most Trusted Name in Food by Louis Hatchett
Adventures in Good Cooking by Duncan Hines, edited by Louis Hatchett
The Dessert Book
by Duncan Hines, edited by Louis Hatchett

              

Duncan Hines (1880–1959) may be best known for the cake mixes, baked goods, and
bread products that bear his name, but most people forget that he was a real person
and not just a fictitious figure invented for the brand. America’s pioneer restaurant critic,
Hines discovered his passion while working as a traveling salesman during the 1920s
and 1930s—a time when food standards were poorly enforced and safety was a
constant concern. He traveled across America discovering restaurants and offering his
recommendations to readers in his best-selling compilation Adventures in Good Eating
(1935). The success of this work and of his subsequent publications led Hines to
manufacture the extremely popular food products that we still enjoy today.

For the horse lover: The Kentucky Derby by James C. Nicholson

Each year on the first Saturday in May, the world turns its attention to the twin spires of Churchill Downs for the high-stakes excitement of the “greatest two minutes in sports,”  the Kentucky Derby. No American sporting event can claim the history, tradition, or pageantry that the Kentucky Derby holds. For more than 130 years, spectators have been fascinated by the magnificent horses that run the Louisville track. Thoroughbreds such as Secretariat and Barbaro have earned instant international fame, along with jockeys such as Isaac Murphy, Ron Turcotte, and Calvin Borel. The Kentucky Derby: How the Run for the Roses Became America’s Premier Sporting Event calls this great tradition to post and illuminates its history and culture.

 

Friday Night Spotlight: Charles Walters

Charles Walters TCM Friday Night Spotlight

Good news classic film fans, all throughout December, Turner Classic Movies is hosting a spotlight on the legendary Hollywood director and choreographer, Charles Walters! This marathon of movies will occur every Friday of this month, so be sure to tune in. The schedule of films is listed in the calendar below. If you have Time Warner Cable, you will find these movies on channel 608. For other cable providers, you can to go TCM’s website and use their live streaming feature!

To prepare yourself for this film extravaganza, check out our recently published book on Charles Walters!

In this first full-length biography of Walters, Brent Phillips chronicles Walter’s career on Broadway and his successes at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Phillips recounts Walter’s associations with Lucille Ball, Joan Crawford, Gloria Swanson, among many others, and examines his uncredited work on several films, including the blockbuster Gigi. This revealing book also considers Walter’s personal life and explores how he navigated the industry as an openly gay man. Drawing on unpublished oral histories, correspondence, and new interviews, this biography offers an entertaining and important new look at an exciting era in Hollywood history.

      

 

 

 

 

 

From Walters’ directing expertise to his flashy choreography, this is a spotlight series you don’t want to miss!

Remembering Thomas Barnes

Tom BarnesOn Sunday, October 12, 2014, UPK author Thomas Barnes, 56,
passed away in his home in Barbourville, KY. Barnes was a forestry
professor at UK with an uncanny ability to capture nature’s graces
on camera. A highlight of the memories and accomplishments of his lifetime can be found here.

Known best for his love of wildlife, Barnes enjoyed spending his time documenting Kentucky landscapes. UPK has worked with Barnes over the years, putting out a vast array of books showcasing his life’s work.

One of his most acclaimed books includes Wildflowers and Ferns of Kentucky, which guides readers through the vast variation of plant life found across the bluegrass state, including photographs and leaf line drawings of over six hundred and fifty species. Barnes combines these striking photographs with essays describing the splendor found throughout Kentucky’s natural preserves and ecological areas. It was the first new statewide guide to appear in thirty years, making it an essential addition to the library or field pack of the wildflower enthusiast, naturalist, and the general outdoorsman.

Revered for his passions and loved by many, Barnes will not soon be forgotten. UPK sends their condolences to his family during this difficult time.

For Jane Gentry Vance, 1941 – 2014

Jane Gentry Vance Hunting for a Christmas Tree after Dark

A sudden mildness in the cold field.
Scraps of snow still strewn on the hillside.
The net of stars cast out overhead.
The shapes of old cedars come toward me
familiar as loved bodies approaching
from a long way off.
The creek in a hurry, as full of itself
as a zipper, the slow-melting snow.

I can hardly make out the rock fence
wavering up the hill, cold stone
on cold stone, stacked together
by unknown hands so many years ago.

How grateful I am for this moment of peace
my body has made with gravity, this
pulling things out of their places
and holding them in,
like Orion the hunter, who, when I blink,
seems to throw his leg over the low fence
of the horizon and climb into this bound with me.

Up ahead, looking for the one perfect tree,
my cousin John. His lantern bobs through
the dark meadow. He raises the globe
of light over and over in prospect.
I hang back, feeling rich in the black
waste, safe in his bowl of earth,
with rocks outcropping in the flattened grass,
trees wet, dirt sweetened by the downhill run-off
of all fear. Though the interstate throbs
and the town lights bleed into the blot
of circling trees, from here the stars redeem
the dark that makes them shine.

from What Comes Down to Us: 25 Contemporary Kentucky Poets. link

Happy Father’s Day! Books on Dad Written by their Children

Oh, Dads…a seemingly limitless source of bad jokes (have you heard this one? What do you call an Alligator wearing a vest? An investigator!), bear hugs, and well-meaning advice. Some Dads are goofy, some serious, and my Dad will probably spend all day watching the U.S. Open, yelling at golf balls to “Get in there!” If I were to write a book about my Dad, it would include his terrible scrambled eggs recipe and endless battle against the rabbits that eat the flowers in his yard. Below are a few of our favorite books written by children about their fathers…I promise, the stories are much more interesting than scrambled eggs.

Buy or Pre-Order:

Hitchcock’s Partner in Suspense

Voice of the Wildcats

Dalton Trumbo

My Life as a Mankiewicz

Portrait of a Father

My Father, Daniel Boone