Category Archives: Kentucky Books

Kentucky Basketball Legends: Still Making Their Mark

Members of the 1998 Kentucky Men’s Basketball Championship team will sign Maker’s Mark annual commemorative bottles at the Keeneland Entertainment Center this Friday, April 13, at 7 a.m. Among those signing at the event will be forward guard Allen Edwards, guard Jeff Sheppard, and former UK head coach Tubby Smith, all of whom are featured in Wildcat Memories: Inside Stories from Kentucky Basketball Greats. In this book, author Doug Brunk details the cherished bond between Kentucky basketball and the citizens of the Commonwealth through first-hand accounts from some of the Wildcats’ most renowned legends.

Tickets for the Maker’s Mark signing are already sold out, but you still have a chance to get up close and personal with these champions by way of this engrossing book. Below is an excerpt of Coach Tubby Smith’s chapter from Wildcat Memories:


As a coach, you love the fans, and you want their support. Having an affinity for the fan base is essential. You are providing a service coaching their team. You are trying to win, and you are trying to do the right things for your players, your coaches, the university, and the fans. Fans may boo you or cheer you. They call and they write with praise and criticism. But you can’t let that affect you, or you’re not going to last long in coaching or be successful in coaching. I became a college coach for the student-athletes, to get them educated and to teach them the game of basketball.

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During his ten-year tenure, Tubby Smith guided UK to one national championship, five SEC Tournament titles, and six Sweet Sixteen finishes. (Courtesy of Victoria Graff.)

During my tenure at UK there was an element of the fan base that didn’t think our teams had won enough games, but in five of my ten years as coach we probably played the toughest schedule in the history of UK basketball. I wish we could have won more games while I was head coach. But we were competitive, we graduated our players, and we kept the program clean. If there was pressure, it was pressure to make sure we did things in a first-class manner. 

One thing I appreciate about UK fans is that they know how to be grateful, because the program has been so successful , and the fans are proud of that success. They show their pride, and they should. They show their commitment by calling in to talk shows, writing letters, and flocking to Rupp Arena or wherever the team plays. You’re not going to find more loyal, passionate fans for their team than followers of the Wildcats. That’s the one common thing. Just about everybody in Kentucky is pulling for you to be successful. It’s a way of life in the Commonwealth. 

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An Open Letter

Dear Supporters of the University Press of Kentucky:

Based on the recently passed state budget, the University Press of Kentucky (UPK) will lose approximately $672,000 out of a total operating budget of $2.86 million against sales of $1.92 million. The University of Kentucky will work with UPK to plan increases in efficiency and enhanced revenues to partially offset the loss of funding. Further, the University of Kentucky and all partner institutions of UPK will be expected to provide financial support to fill any remaining funding gap. The long-term goal is to chart a strong path forward for UPK.

The fact is that many university presses receive funding and support from multiple sources. Against that backdrop, a fresh approach to our funding model is economic reality. It reflects that technology and other forces are changing the way we transmit and discuss ideas. We should seize this moment to continue to evolve, as we have already been doing, in ways that keep pace with change and serve as a model for other university presses.

In this context, it is critical that current and prospective authors and UPK’s business partners understand that we are on a path toward stability. Our short-term financial challenges are transitory. We urge our authors and vendors to understand that we are conducting business as usual.

Many supporters of UPK have asked how they can help. This is how: share our news. Help the faculty you interact with understand that we plan to be here for the long haul. Help them know that UPK looks forward to continuing our work with writers and scholars around the world to advance thinking and scholarship. Help them understand that the best way to keep us growing and improving is to send us thoughtful, significant, and creative manuscripts of the highest caliber.

We are grateful for the messages of support given to us by so many in recent months. We look forward to continuing to work with you as we chart our path forward—one that will secure the future of UPK and the rich cultural and intellectual heritage in which we play such a vital role.

Sincerely,

David W. Blackwell, Provost, University of Kentucky

Deirdre Scaggs, Interim Dean, UK Libraries

Leila Salisbury, Director, University Press of Kentucky

Wildcat Slush: A Treat for Players and Fans Alike

Ah, March in the Bluegrass… There might be snow (check), there might be spring (still waiting), but there’s always madnessMarch Madness, that is. Since the Big Dance started yesterday, we figured Wildcat fans would be starting to prepare for Thursday, when UK faces Davidson College at 7:10 PM EST in the first round. (We’d be remiss if we failed to mention that Murray State, the other Kentucky team in this year’s tourney, tips off against West Virginia tomorrow at 4 PM. Good luck, Racers!)

If you’re gathering with a group to cheer on the Cats, you have to have the right snacks and drinks, right? If you’re looking for a non-alcoholic treat fit for champions (or those cheering on champions [*fingers crossed*]), we’ve got just the trick: Wildcat Slush.

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Deliciously sweet and easy to prepare, Wildcat Slush became a postgame treat and “pick-me-up” of sorts for the ‘78 NCAA Championship team. In the following excerpt from Forty Minutes to Glory: Inside the Kentucky Wildcats’ 1978 Championship Season, Doug Brunk provides the backstory of how this refreshing concoction was created.

Lexington dentist Roy Holsclaw said that during a late-January postgame radio interview show, Coach Hall lamented how year after year his teams fell into a shooting slump and struggled to maintain stamina and sharpness by the time late January and February rolled around. A local physician who listened to the radio show that night wrote a letter to Coach Hall, suggesting that the symptoms he described indicated possible depletion of potassium, a key electrolyte that impacts energy and stamina. “He wrote, ‘I would suggest that you put your players on a high-potassium diet,’” Dr. Holsclaw recalled. “Coach Hall handed me the letter and said, ‘Roy, why don’t you check into this.’”

Chemical examination of blood drawn from the players revealed that some did have low potassium levels, so Dr. Holsclaw conferred with the physician, who recommended adding potassium-rich pineapples, bananas, and strawberries to their diet. Coincidentally, Dr. Holsclaw’s wife, Katharine, had a frozen-dessert recipe handed down from her mother that contained all of those fruits in their natural juices, so the couple mixed up the recipe in a three-gallon Tupperware container and stuck it in their freezer at home. Dr. Holsclaw brought in the frozen treat prior to many practices and all remaining home games that season, intended for the players to consume afterward. “I would turn it over to one of the managers,” he said. “They’d set it on a counter or something, and during the two hour course of the practice or game it would thaw out partially, and we’d serve it in a little plastic cup.” The concoction became known as Wildcat Slush. “It seemed to give us a boost,” Coach Parsons said.

Learn how to make your own Wildcat Slush below, and if you’re in need of the perfect book to read between tournament games, be sure to pick up Forty Minutes to Glory by Doug Brunk, available now!
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Top 3 Lincoln Myths and Conspiracy Theories

In Edward Steers Jr.’s Lincoln Legends, Myths, Hoaxes, and Confabulations Associated with Our Greatest President he shows us some of the more outlandish ideas and theories concerning the fourteenth president of the United States. Here are some very memorable highlights from his work.Lincoln Legends Cover

Top 3 Lincoln Myths and Conspiracy Theories

#3 Dr. Samuel Mudd’s innocence

There was the claim ardently pushed by the Mudd family and Dr. Samuel Mudd himself that he was not a part of the conspiracy to kidnap President Lincoln. The story goes that he was simply a gentle country doctor who had never encountered Booth before and was persecuted for holding to the Hippocratic Oath and tending to the wounds Booth acquired during the assassination of Lincoln. The conviction goes that he was a member of the group that plotted Lincoln’s kidnap and that he had encountered Booth multiple times before.

#2 Abraham Lincoln was not the son of Thomas Lincoln

This theory states that Abraham Lincoln was actually the son of Nancy Hanks, his mother, and four possible Abraham Enloes who were said to be candidates for the fatherhood of President Lincoln. This was a theory even during Lincoln’s lifetime, and he received numerous challenges to the legitimacy of his birth during his political career.

#1 Mary Todd Lincoln was a Confederate sympathizer and possible spy

During the Civil War, rumors were spread of a southern spy in the White House, and due to her birth place being Kentucky, her brothers’ service to the Confederate army, and her stepsister’s marriage to a Confederate brigadier general, Mary Todd was seen as the most likely suspect. There was even nearly an investigation into her loyalties that was quashed by Lincoln’s testimony of his family’s loyalty to the Union.

If you are interested in more stretched truths, odd ideas, and engineered falsehoods, check out Edward Steers Jr.’s Lincoln Legends, Myths, Hoaxes, and Confabulations Associated with Our Greatest President as well as his other work Hoax: Hitler’s Diaries, Lincoln’s Assassins, and Other Famous Frauds.

KBF 2017: A Photoblog

To celebrate Kentucky Humanities‘ 2017 Kentucky Book Fair, we invited one of our current interns, Cassie, to do some reporting from the scene and write about her experience. Read what she (and a few of our authors) had to say—and take a look at what she had to see—below!


This past Saturday marked the 36th annual Kentucky Book Fair, and this was the first time it has ever been held in Lexington! About 180 authors set up tables and promoted their latest books. As a current student at the University of Kentucky and an intern at the University Press of Kentucky, this book fair was a welcome and surprising experience for someone who has never been to one. During my internship, I have seen how much dedication publishers have for the book fair. Promoting their authors and their press—it is whirlwind of exciting events! The following are some fun photos from my time at the book fair and a few, brief interviews with UPK authors.

Having the Kentucky Book Fair at the Kentucky Horse Park during the same weekend as a rodeo was so Kentucky. #onlyinKentucky
Part of the University Press of Kentucky’s booth.

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UPK’s Katie Cross Gibson and UK Libraries‘ Shanna Wilbur staffing the booth.

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The welcome sign! Getting ready to walk through the door.

Author signing room

Entering the author signing room!

Quick Q&A with UPK author Colleen O’Connor Olson

Q: Have you attended the Kentucky Book Fair before?
A: No, I have not.

Q: How do you enjoy it at the fair?
A: I like it! It’s fun to talk about my books. There are lots of people and just so much going on.

Q: Do you have a favorite author in attendance today?
A: I don’t. I’m just checking out new people.

Colleen Olson signing

Olson holding Mammoth Cave Curiosities.

Q&A with UPK author Robert G. Lawson

Q: Have you attended the Kentucky Book Fair before?
A: No.

Q: How do you like it?
A: It’s good! I don’t know if I can stand it until four o’clock. (Editor’s note: Lawson got his wish, as he sold out of copies of Who Killed Betty Gail Brown? and was actually able to leave early!)

Q: Do you have a favorite author in attendance?
A: This guy right here [Richard H. Underwood]. He’s my best friend.

Q: What is your favorite part about the book fair?
A: Seeing everyone. I have had a lot of friends walk by.

Q: What excites you most about your book?
A: It’s out there and people seem to enjoy it…
Richard Underwood: It was one of his first cases back when he was practicing law.

Richard Underwood and Bob Lawson at KBF '17

Authors and signing neighbors Richard Underwood and Robert G. Lawson. UPK just released Lawson’s Who Killed Betty Gail Brown? this month.

Julia Johnson and JGV Collection

Julia Johnson, editor of The New and Collected Poems of Jane Gentry.

MFA intern Rachel Kersey being interviewed

Rachel, UPK intern and UK MFA in Creative Writing student, being interviewed by a Frankfort TV station.
So many authors and attendees—thanks to all who came!

Bourbon Bliss

Bourbon is beloved nationwide, but Kentucky has an unquenchable adoration for this spirit. Not only is it an $8.5 billion industry in the state, but there’s even a petition to switch Kentucky’s official drink from milk to bourbon.

KBFAs September is officially bourbon month, the annual Kentucky Bourbon Festival is currently underway through September 17 in Bardstown. Delicious food, displays, music and entertainment, and a number of other events are being offered this week.

In celebration of this luscious libation, below is a sampling of recipes from Albert W.A. Schmid’s latest book with us, Burgoo, Barbecue & Bourbon.

 


 

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Bourbon Slush

2 cups strong tea
1 cup sugar
1 – 12 ounce can frozen lemonade (as is)
1 – 6 ounce frozen orange juice
6 cups water
1 ½ cups bourbon

Mix all of the ingredients. Freeze at least 12 hours. Remove from freezer 1 hour before serving. Scrape while still icy. Serve with straw and top with orange slice, maraschino cherry, and sprig of mint.

“The Greatest Kentucky Drink”

An Old Fashioned glass or a tumbler
3 ice cubes
2 ounces Kentucky Bourbon
4 ounces branch water

Place the ice cubes into the tumbler. Add the bourbon and branch water. Enjoy!

Moon Glow

Crushed ice
1 ½ bourbon
2 ounces cranberry juice
2 ounces orange juice
2 teaspoons maraschino cherry juice

Pack a tall glass with crushed ice. Add the cranberry juice and the orange juice. Add the maraschino cherry juice. Then add the bourbon. Stir well with a bar spoon and garnish with 2 maraschino cherries and a straw.

Beer Lovers & Lovers of Beer Cheese

Happy National Beer Lovers Day! As far as hard beverages go, the Bluegrass State is known for its bourbon, but our state also boasts some great craft beer. Lexington is home to the Brewgrass Trail, and other breweries and pubs are scattered across the Commonwealth. You can find local beer in Louisville, Paris, Somerset, and beyond.

Although craft beer isn’t unique to Kentucky, Kentucky does something truly unique with beer. We add beer to cheese to make a delicious dip / spread / culinary concoction aptly known as beer cheese. In fact, Clark County, Kentucky–the Winchester area–is the birthplace of beer cheese, and we even have a Beer Cheese Trail!

BeerCheeseTrail_7x5_tabletent_2015_V2

To celebrate National Beer Lovers Day, below is a recipe that utilizes beer from Lexington’s own West Sixth Brewing. You can find this and other awesome recipes in Garin Pirnia’s The Beer Cheese Book, which we’ll be releasing this October. Cheers!

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Smithtown Seafood West Sixth Porter Beer Cheese

This recipe by Smithtown’s chef, Jon Sanning, includes a rich porter. The restaurant serves this beer cheese with fresh seasonal vegetables.

Makes about 5 cups

2 large garlic cloves, chopped
¼ medium yellow onion, chopped
1 tablespoon Crystal hot sauce (no substitutions!)
½ teaspoon Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
¼ teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
½ teaspoon mustard powder
1 pound and 2 ounces sharp white cheddar, grated
1 cup West Sixth Brewing Pay It Forward Cocoa Porter

In a food processor blend the garlic, onion, hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce, pepper, salt, cayenne, and mustard until smooth. Add ¼ of the grated cheddar and continue processing until smooth. Then alternate between adding the porter and the rest of cheese. When all of the beer and cheese has been added, scrape down the sides of the processor and continue to process until completely smooth.