Kentucky Crafted 2019

The Kentucky Crafted Market is March 15-17 at the Alltech Arena of the Kentucky Horse Park. Come out to enjoy the live music, specialty food, arts and crafts, and all of your favorite Kentucky/regional books from UPK. Organized by the Kentucky Arts Council, the Market will include nearly 200 exhibitors, and you can find us at booth #241, on the left of the public entrance and the west concourse. We will be near the concessions, as well as right beside Acclaim Publishing.

Here are some of our new and recent releases that will be available during the Market!

Mommy Goose cover.jpg
Be sure to stop by our booth on Saturday, March 16 between 3:00 and 6:00 pm. Author Mike Norris will be signing copies of Mommy Goose: Rhymes from the Mountains, singing a few songs, and playing guitar!

Friday the 15th is exclusively for wholesale buyers—more information found here—but doors open to the public at 10 am on Saturday and Sunday. Tickets can be ordered in advance online and will be $8 at the door. Parking is $5. See you there!

UPK’s Spring 2019 catalog is here!

The University Press of Kentucky’s Spring and Summer 2019 catalog is now out! Featuring such titles as The US Senate and the Commonwealth, Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crownand Adolph Rupp and the Rise of Kentucky Basketball, there’s something for everyone.

Check out our new releases!

UPK is also proud to announce the launch of two imprints: Andarta Books (in partnership with Brécourt Academic, publisher of Global War Studies) and South Limestone. Combining original research and top-level scholarship, Andarta Books will publish works in a variety of subject areas such as military/naval history, air power studies, diplomatic history, and intelligence studies. Decision in the Atlantic: The Allies and the Longest Campaign of the Second World War is the first title from Andarta Books, while Wildflowers and Ferns of Red River Gorge and the Greater Red River Basin and Wild Yet Tasty: A Guide to Edible Plants in Eastern Kentucky are the first titles for South Limestone.

Take a look at forthcoming books in the Screen Classics series!

Many of our other series have new titles, too. Sir Barton and the Making of the Triple Crown will be the most recent installment in the Horses in History series, while The Soldier Image and State Building in Modern China, 1924-1945 is part of the Asia in the New Millennium series. Foreign Friends: Syngman Rhee, American Exceptionalism, and the Division of Korea and Lincoln, Seward, and US Foreign Relations in the Civil War Era are forthcoming in the Studies in Conflict, Diplomacy, and Peace series. Coming in April, Biplanes at War: US Marine Corps Aviation in the Small War Eras, 1915-1934 and Lectures of the Air Corps Tactical School and American Strategic Bombing in World War II will be the first members of the Aviation and Air Power series.

Multiple of our Association of the United States Army (AUSA) series have upcoming releases as well. Click here to find them.

The catalog also includes a novel from Aga Khan Prize for Fiction winner Lamar Herrin, a work that explores pop culture and what can happen when people move beyond the borders of law and order, and an edited collection inspired by a recent photography exhibition at the University of Louisville.

And don’t forget to see what is new in paperback!

Johnny Cox Named 2019 SEC Legend

Johnny Cox, a contributor in Doug Brunk’s Wildcat Memories: Inside Stories From Kentucky Basketball Greatswill be the University of Kentucky’s member of the 2019 Southeastern Conference Legends. This group of former stars will be honored during the 2019 SEC Tournament in Nashville, Tennessee.

Screenshot (22)

(Courtesy of the University of Kentucky Archives)

 

Cox’s time at UK was marked by two SEC Championships and a national championship. He was also a three-time All-SEC performer, as well as a NCAA Consensus First Team All-American in 1959. Over the course of his three seasons, he averaged 17.4 points per game and 12.0 rebounds, and he is one of only a handful of players to have recorded more than 1,000 career points and rebounds. Since his time at UK, his No. 24 jersey has been retired and he has been inducted into the UK Athletics Hall of Fame.

 

brunkCover.indd

 

 

“When my jersey was retired in the rafters of Rupp Arena I remember feeling like I’d done something worthwhile. I suppose I was successful in basketball at UK because I spent a lot of time fooling with the game, kept trying to get better. When you spend a lot of time doing something, and you don’t deviate from it, you get results.”

Johnny Cox in Wildcat Memories

 

Meet the Press: Patty Weber, Production and Publishing Services Manager

Name: Patty Weber

Position: Production and Service Center Manager

Hometown: Baltimore, MD

Social Media Handles: @bookswrangler on Twitter

Alma mater; major; minor: B.A. in Art History from Goucher College; MLA in Liberal Arts from Johns Hopkins University


Tell us a little bit about your position at UPK.

I head up the Production department, and the soon-to-be-launched Publishing Services Center. Production is what happens at the end of the process of getting the book published: doing the typesetting, designing the cover, and getting the book printed and shipped. The Publishing Services Center offers all kinds of solutions to different kinds of projects, from journals to logo design to one-off special printings.

What’s one of your favorite UPK titles and why?

I got caught up reading Kentucky Heirloom Seeds by Bill Best and Dobree Adams when I was checking a book proof; it sucked me in!

If someone was visiting Kentucky for the first time and you were their tour guide, where would you take them? Any specific restaurants, landmarks, etc.?

I am a newcomer to Kentucky; I’m the one who needs the tour guide!

Do you have a favorite font? If so, what is it?

I love Doves Type, for the amazing story behind it.

doves type cropped

Did you know you wanted to work in publishing? When you were a kid, did you want to do something different as an adult?

When I was a kid, I wanted to be the person who names the Crayola colors.

What’s something most people don’t know about you? What’s a random factoid about yourself?

I collect pins! I have a bunch of brooches – some old, some new, some pretty, and some just wacky.

What was the last book you read? Would you recommend it? Why or why not?

I read Uprooted by Naomi Novik after it sat in my To-Read pile for a while, and I love it! It has a classic fairytale or folklore kind of flavor, and I couldn’t put it down.

If someone asked you to give them a random piece of advice, what would you say? Do you have a personal motto?

A positive attitude can be the secret to success. My motto is “It’s going to be great!”

If you could try out any job for a day, what would you like to try?

I still think it would be fun to name the Crayola colors.

patty weber

 

 

Author Carol Boggess Wins Book Award

KHS Award logoUniversity Press of Kentucky author Carol Boggess has been named the recipient of a 2018 Kentucky History Award given by the Kentucky Historical Society for her book, James Still: A Life. The Kentucky History Awards recognize outstanding achievements by historians, public history professionals, volunteers, business and civic leaders, communities, and historical organizations throughout the Commonwealth, promoting the history of state and local history. The awards were presented at the Kentucky History Awards Ceremony on Friday, November 9, at the Old State Capitol in Frankfort.

Boggess offers a detailed portrait of writer James Still in the definitive biography of the man known as the “dean of Appalachian literature.” Despite his notable output, including the classic novel River of Earth, and his importance as a mentor to generations of young writers, Still was extremely private, preferring a quiet existence in a century-old log house between the waters of Wolfpen Creek and Dead Mare Branch in Knott County, Kentucky. Boggess, who befriended the author in the last decade of his life, draws on correspondence, journal entries, numerous interviews with Still and his family, and extensive archival research to illuminate his somewhat mysterious personal life.

In James Still: A Life, James Still.final.inddBoggess explores every period of the author’s life, from his childhood in Alabama, through the years he spent supporting himself in various odd jobs while trying to build his literary career, to the decades he spent fostering other talents. This long-overdue biography not only offers an important perspective on the Still’s work and art but also celebrates the legacy of a man who succeeded in becoming a legend in his own lifetime. According to Lee Smith, author of Dimestore: A Writer’s Life, Boggess’s “graceful and informative biography sheds light into many shaded places and dark rooms of his long life, illuminating the sources and passions of this beloved giant of American literature, one of the greatest writers of all time.”

James Still is the seventh University Press of Kentucky publication in eight years to win a KHS award, joining Kentucky and the Great War: World War I on the Home Front by David J. Bettez; The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia by Gerard L. Smith, Karen Cotton McDaniel, and John A. Hardin; Bloody Breathitt: Politics and Violence in the Appalachian South by T.R.C. Hutton; The Kentucky Derby: How the Run for the Roses Became America’s Premier Sporting Event by James C. Nicholson; A History of Education in Kentucky by William E. Ellis; and Lessons in Likeness: Portrait Painters in Kentucky and the Ohio River Valley, 1802-1920 by Estill Curtis Pennington. James Still was previously named the winner of the 2018 Weatherford Award for Non-Fiction.

Carol Boggess is president of the Appalachian Studies Association and former English professor at Mars Hill University.

Boggess KHS award pic

KHS Executive Director Scott Alvey, Carol Boggess, and KHS Governing Board President Constance Alexander. Photo by Marvin Young.

 

This #GivingTuesday, #GiveUPK

As the year end approaches, we are looking back on the many moments of celebration of the 75th anniversary of the University Press of Kentucky, the nonprofit publisher for a consortium of fifteen universities, colleges, and two major historical societies in the state. We’ve been proud to host author readings, an open house, special events at regional conferences, and an exhibit of books and materials from the Press’s first 75 years. We’ve been fortunate to hire our first in-house book designer in 20 years and to establish a new trade imprint. More meaningful than anything else, however, has been the outpouring of support from citizens all across the Commonwealth. Your letters, emails, and phone calls sent the message that the Press has been doing something very special for 75 years—recording and uncovering Kentucky’s history, culture, and heritage for readers today and for generations to come.

PressEnrichmentFund04

At the moment of this milestone anniversary, we at the Press bring a renewed sense of energy and purpose to our role as a connector: each day we strive to connect people, ideas, institutions, and projects. We look outward to this evolving world of learning and communication, seeking the ways in which we can be a part of key conversations and the development of important ideas. Through the books we publish, we hope to document, inspire, and encourage exploration of topics and events, whether across the globe or on our native patch of soil.

This year we are delighted to be a part of Giving Tuesday. We ask you to celebrate #GivingTuesday with us by continuing to support the Press with a financial contribution to the University Press Enrichment Fund. As our anniversary year draws to a close, we are busily planning the books and projects that will shape our organization in the decades to come. There is so much exciting work ahead. And through your contributions, you will keep the University Press of Kentucky growing and thriving.

With gratitude,

Leila W. Salisbury
Director

PressEnrichmentFund05

 

Meet the Press: Kayla Coco, Marketing Intern

Name: Kayla Coco-Stotts

Position: Marketing Intern

Hometown: St. Louis, Missouri

Alma mater; major; minor: University of Kentucky; B.A. in Print Journalism; Communication minor (December 2018)


Why should students be interested in their local university press?

I believe that students should be interested in their local university press because there is so much culture and accomplishment within university presses that I think is somewhat overlooked. I heard about UPK my freshman year of college and knew I always wanted to intern here, but so many others haven’t had the chance to learn about the amazing work UPK does for the Commonwealth. Students especially are able to learn so much from UPK; it’s like having a library of amazing authors, reads, and resources right on campus.

Why should students support their university press? How are some ways to support the press?

Students should support their university presses because they’re in need of our support! Even just sharing social media, buying UPK books, or going to events that feature UPK authors stimulates the marketplace of ideas and keeps the local book culture thriving within the universities.

What have you learned during your time here, and how will you use the skills you gained as you start a career, further your education, etc.?

I’ve learned how to craft a press kit and the true meaning of marketing. I never thought I would see myself enjoying the marketing side of publishing, but it is truly rewarding to excited people about the projects we’re working on. I’ve already been thankful enough to use the skills I’ve obtained here to set up a job when I graduate.

What’s one of your favorite UPK titles and why?

Mend: Poems by Kwoya Fagin Maples was amazing, heartfelt, and conveyed a level of anguish that I could never imagine being strong enough to experience. I also really loved Clarence Brown: Hollywood’s Forgotten Master by Gwenda Young because it gave me an opportunity to learn about an age of Hollywood that I’ve just not taken the time to understand before.

If someone was visiting Kentucky for the first time and you were their tour guide, where would you take them?

Actually, I’m from St. Louis originally so I’ve kind of become an unofficial tour guide for Lexington (I’m still waiting for my name tag to come in…I’m sure they’re sending it any day now). I always take people on a long walk around UK’s campus because I think it’s gorgeous, as well as downtown to some of my favorite restaurants and bars, like West Main Crafting Co. and Buddha Lounge. Breakfast? Josie’s for sure. Needing some lunch? Let’s head to Planet Thai! Can you tell I love food?

Did you always know you wanted to intern in publishing? When you were a kid, did you want to do something different as an adult?

Growing up I was very driven and academically successful, and I always heard, “You’re going to be a doctor someday,” from relatives. When I started at UK, I began in biosystems engineering, but doing something I could do versus something I wanted to do was entirely different. After a quick Google search and some encouragement from friends, I switched to journalism and decided to intern at UPK during my first semester. I have always loved books, and being a book editor is what I used to tell people I would do, “when I grow up.”

What was the last book you read?

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas and The Rules of Magic: A Novel by Alice Hoffman. Both are amazing books!

Name three things you can’t live without.

My dogs, sweatshirts, and dry shampoo

If someone asked you to give them a random piece of advice, what would you say? Do you have a personal motto?

Just do what you love. People always are going to say, “life’s too short,” but life can get pretty long and dull when you’re stuck doing something you don’t really enjoy, whether that be in a professional or personal environment. Oh, and while you’re still in high school, get a credit card, only use it to buy gas, and always make payments on time.

What’s your favorite word?

Sonder: the realization that each random passerby is living a life as complex and vivid as your own.

What’s something most people don’t know about you? What’s a random factoid about yourself?

I try to be as conscious as I can about living a minimal waste lifestyle by avoiding plastic containers or cups and avoiding using more than I need.

If you could have dinner with any three people—dead or alive, famous or not—who would it be?

Abraham Lincoln, Stephen King, and Malcolm X.

If you could try out any job for a day, what would you like to try?

Andy Lassner, the executive producer of The Ellen DeGeneres Show, because I love a good scare and I think Ellen and I would be great pals.

Screen Shot 2018-11-14 at 11.18.11 AM.png