Peacemakers: The Past May Hold the Key to Our Present

pardewComps.inddThe wars that accompanied the breakup of Yugoslavia in the 1990s were the deadliest European conflicts since World War II. The violence eventually led to genocide when, over the course of ten days in July 1995, Serbian troops under the command of General Ratko Mladic murdered 8,000 unarmed men and boys who had sought refuge at a UN safe-haven in Srebrenica. The United States quickly launched a diplomatic intervention with military support that ultimately brought peace to the new nations created when Yugoslavia disintegrated. Peacemakers: American Leadership and the End of Genocide in the Balkans by Ambassador James W. Pardew is dedicated to the mission of detailing the successful multilateral intervention in the Balkans from 1995–2008. It is, in fact, the first inclusive history of this event.

As an American diplomatic official directly involved in negotiations, Pardew presents a comprehensive narrative history that draws on archival research,  first-hand experience, personal connections, and detailed journals he kept during his time in the State Department. He examines the conflicts starting with the Bosian War and continuing through the subsequent conflicts in Kosovo and Macedonia.

With the ongoing debates regarding the role of the US in global affairs—and the US facing threats from North Korea, Iraq, and Afghanistan—Pardew’s perspective on the implications of war and peace are timely. He provides lessons in intervening in very volatile situations, both for people in the field of US foreign relations and those who study it.

For answers to the current European Crises, the leaders at the United States Institute of Peace are looking for answers in four key areas: leverage for peace agreements, necessary components of effective peace agreements, implementation of peace agreements and the possibility of peace in corrupt situations. In the video clip below, James Pardew is engaging in a discussion with the US Institute of Peace, taking the time to draw from his experiences, exceptionally detailed and addressed in his book, and provide the materials necessary for answers to achieving peace in Europe. Peacemakers is evidence that the past may in fact hold necessary tools and keys to the success of our present and future.

Leaders at the United States Institute of Peace are looking to this past event for answers to the current European Crises. They’re looking for answers in four key areas: leverage for peace agreements, necessary components of effective peace agreements, implementation of peace agreements and the possibility of peace in corrupt situations. In the video clip (link attached below), James Pardew is having this discussion with the US Institute of Peace. They take the time to draw from the experiences, exceptionally detailed and addressed in his book, and draw the material necessary for answers to achieving peace in Europe. Peacemakers is evidence that the past may in fact hold necessary tools and keys to the success of our present and future.

To find out more information about Peacemakers, click here.

 

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About University Press of Kentucky

The University Press of Kentucky has a dual mission—the publication of books of high scholarly merit in a variety of fields for a largely academic audience and the publication of books about the history and culture of Kentucky, the Ohio Valley region, the Upper South, and Appalachia. The Press is the statewide mandated nonprofit scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, operated as an agency of the University of Kentucky and serving all state institutions of higher learning, plus five private colleges and Kentucky's two major historical societies.

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