“MY SEVEN MINUTES ALONE WITH ELIZABETH TAYLOR”

The Classic Movie Hub has begun a five book giveaway for You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet: Interviews with Stars from Hollywood’s Golden Era by James Bawden and Ron Miller. The book includes a collection of forty interviews, which Bawden and Miller ask specific but “off the wall” questions to let some of the most famous actors in film history tell their own stories. All of the interviewees in the collection have since passed away, so this book gives a final recognition of some of the greatest film success stories. There will be five drawings throughout the month on Oct 7, Oct 14, Oct 21, Oct 28 and Nov 4th. To enter to win there are just two requirements:

  1. At the bottom of their blog post about the giveaway, answer the question, “If you had the chance to interview one Classic Movie Star, who would it be and why?”
  2. Tweet: “Just entered to win the “You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet” #BookGiveaway courtesy of @KentuckyPress & @ClassicMovieHub”

Below is an excerpt from the book. In his career as a journalist, Ron Miller got seven minutes alone with Elizabeth Taylor and he reveals his experience and thoughts of her character.


It’s amazing how much mileage a guy can get out of having spent seven minutes alone with Elizabeth Taylor. I don’t think she let that many men spend seven minutes alone with her—unless, of course, she married them first. That’s why I feel so very special these days when somebody asks me, “Did you ever interview Elizabeth Taylor?” Usually, I smile kind of wisely and just nod my head yes, waiting for them to ask what she was really like in person. I’m not the least bit backward about answering that question either. After all, I did spend a whole seven minutes getting to know her.

First, I’m happy to report that Elizabeth Taylor, who was in her early fifties at the time, was very attractive. Yes, she was a bit overweight, but she still had lovely features and her famous violet eyes were truly mesmerizing. I mean, those eyes were really magical and she knew how to use them.

I also drew the immediate impression that she was down to earth and likeable. I say that because I began our “interview” by cracking a joke that made her nearly spit out her food, which I’m sure made her glad I wasn’t accompanied by a photographer. At the time, her son by second husband Michael Wilding was playing Jesus Christ in a TV miniseries, so I simply asked her if she ever thought, after a career spent on the cover of tabloids, that she’d be known as the mother of Jesus. That notion obviously struck her as pretty funny. And here’s an amazing thing: she laughed really big. At that moment, I knew she was the kind of girl who loved dirty jokes. To my credit, I didn’t tell her any, though, just to test my hypothesis.

 

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About University Press of Kentucky

The University Press of Kentucky has a dual mission—the publication of books of high scholarly merit in a variety of fields for a largely academic audience and the publication of books about the history and culture of Kentucky, the Ohio Valley region, the Upper South, and Appalachia. The Press is the statewide mandated nonprofit scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, operated as an agency of the University of Kentucky and serving all state institutions of higher learning, plus five private colleges and Kentucky's two major historical societies.

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