Too Cold for Comfort

With subzero weather and record breaking lows, many people are staying in their homes these next few days as they wait out the frigid temperatures and icy roads.

What better way to spend your day then catching up on your favorite UPK book! Here is a look at some of my favorite UPK books that I would suggest reading over the next few snow days.

Headless visions—howls and moans—ghostly ladies dressed in black and white—a fiddling spirit dancing on the road. Such are the sights and sounds that inhabit the pages of Lynwood Montell’s Kentucky Ghosts. This collection is representative of the rich tradition of ghost or “haint” tales passed on through the ages and across cultures as a way of dealing with death and the lore of the spirit world. In retelling the tales, Montell has included details about architecture, geography, and local culture. Each tale is told in the voice of the narrator who believe the story to be true. And, who knows . . . ?

This book is also being discounted by 20% as part of UPK’s holiday sale!

To many, Kentucky means the greatest thoroughbreds in the world. To others, it is the home of the finest bourbon. But the obvious success of burgoo, Owensboro barbeque, and Harlan Sanders’s Kentucky Fried Chicken carries the state’s reputation for excellence to a wider audience. From the perfect mint julep to benedictine, from a classic hot brown to cheese chutney, Kentucky’s Best captures the full range of the state’s culinary delights. Linda Allison-Lewis combines traditional and gourmet dishes, offering recipes from all parts of the state and from beloved restaurants and inns.

The paperback edition of this book is being discounted at 20% as well! Get it while it’s still on sale!

Doris Ulmann (1882-1934) was one of the foremost photographers of the twentieth century, yet until now there has never been a biography of this fascinating, gifted artist. Born into a New York Jewish family with a tradition of service, Ulmann sought to portray and document individuals from various groups that she feared would vanish from American life. Inspired by the paintings of the European old masters and by the photographs of Hill and Adamson and Clarence White, Ulmann produced unique and substantial portrait studies. Working in her Park Avenue studio and traveling throughout the east coast, Appalachia, and the deep South, she carefully studied and photographed the faces of urban intellectuals as well as rural peoples. Her subjects included Albert Einstein, Robert Frost, African American basket weavers from South Carolina, and Kentucky mountain musicians. Relying on newly discovered letters, documents, and photographs—many published here for the first time—Philip Jacobs’s richly illustrated biography secures Ulmann’s rightful place in the history of American photography.

This book is currently 80% off of it’s cloth edition during the holiday sale! Buy it before the sale ends soon!

It’s cold outside! Stay warm this winter with one of UPK’s books! Click here to stop by UPK’s website and check out more of our record breaking books for a good read during these record breaking temperatures.

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About University Press of Kentucky

The University Press of Kentucky has a dual mission—the publication of books of high scholarly merit in a variety of fields for a largely academic audience and the publication of books about the history and culture of Kentucky, the Ohio Valley region, the Upper South, and Appalachia. The Press is the statewide mandated nonprofit scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, operated as an agency of the University of Kentucky and serving all state institutions of higher learning, plus five private colleges and Kentucky's two major historical societies.

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