UPweek_banner_2014

Ready, Set, Go: University Press Week 2014

It’s that time of the year again!

The University Press of Kentucky will be celebrating the third annual University Press Week along with our friends at more than 120 other member presses of the American Association of University Presses. This week we’ll be rounding up the news and accomplishments of university presses across the country (and the world), and sharing more of what makes university presses so special.

What is University Press Week exactly? We’re glad you asked. The AAUP breaks it down this way:

In the summer of 1978 President Jimmy Carter proclaimed a University Press Week “in recognition of the impact, both here and abroad, of American university presses on culture and scholarship.” That influence continues today, as does the increasing vitality of university press publishing programs, the many ways and means by which works are now produced and distributed, and the urgent need for articulate discourse in times pervaded by sound bites. Today, a renewed University Press Week highlights the extraordinary work of nonprofit scholarly publishers and their many contributions to culture, the academy, and an informed society.

upw-poster-2014We hope you discover more about us, about university presses as a whole, and some of the great books and people that make our jobs so wonderful. As always, we love to hear from you too! Feel free to leave us a comment here, on Facebook, or chat with us on Twitter (#upweek) if you want to learn more about our unique and influential community.

Additionally, 32 university press blogs (including our own!) have joined together to highlight our history, our books, our staffs, and our specialties. Individual presses will blog on a different theme each day, including Collaboration, Your University Press in Pictures, University Press in Popular Culture, Throwback Thursday, and Follow Friday. Click here for the full blog tour schedule.

Today’s Theme: Collaboration

University of California Press: Featured authors Dr. Paul Farmer and Dr. Jim Yong Kim discuss the collaborative work they are doing to fight the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

University of Chicago Press: A post on the first year of the Turabian Teacher Collaborative, featuring guest content from one of the University of Iowa professors helming the endeavor

Duke University Press: Author Eben Kirksey on collaboration at the intersection of anthropology and biology, including his own recent collection, “The Multispecies Salon.”

University of Georgia Press: A look at the New Georgia Encyclopedia (NGE) partnership, which includes the Georgia Humanities Council, UGA libraries, GALILEO, and the Press. The NGE is the
state’s award-winning, on-line only, multi-media reference work on the people, places, events, and institutions of Georgia.

Project MUSE/Johns Hopkins University Press: Project MUSE is the poster child for collaboration in the university press world, resulting from collaboration between a university press and university library. A rumination on collaboration in the university press world in general, drawing on specific instances of collaboration among university presses from MUSE’s history.

McGill-Queen’s University Press: An elaboration on the title submitted for the online gallery: Landscape Architecture in Canada — a major national project with support from scholars across the country and published simultaneously in French and English by two University Presses. Followed by cross-Canada book tour, “CONVERSATIONS”, in partnership with the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects.

Texas A&M University Press: A post focusing on a new consumer advocacy series launched earlier this year with the Texas A&M School of Public Health, whose mission is to improve the health of communities through education, research, service, outreach, and creative partnerships.

University of Virginia Press: An account of a collaboration between the Press and the Presidential Recordings Project at the Miller Center to create ‘Chasing Shadows,’ a book on the orgins of Watergate, with a special ebook and web site allowing readers to listen to the actual Oval Office conversations.

Yale University Press: Mark Polizzotti, director of the publications program at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, will contribute a guest post to our ‘Museum Quality Books’ series. The series consists of guest posts from the knowledgeable, erudite, witty, insightful, and altogether delightful directors of publishing at the museums and galleries with whom we collaborate on books.

Stay tuned for tomorrow’s theme: Your University Press in Pictures. See you then!

Remembering Thomas Barnes

Tom BarnesOn Sunday, October 12, 2014, UPK author Thomas Barnes, 56,
passed away in his home in Barbourville, KY. Barnes was a forestry
professor at UK with an uncanny ability to capture nature’s graces
on camera. A highlight of the memories and accomplishments of his lifetime can be found here.

Known best for his love of wildlife, Barnes enjoyed spending his time documenting Kentucky landscapes. UPK has worked with Barnes over the years, putting out a vast array of books showcasing his life’s work.

One of his most acclaimed books includes Wildflowers and Ferns of Kentucky, which guides readers through the vast variation of plant life found across the bluegrass state, including photographs and leaf line drawings of over six hundred and fifty species. Barnes combines these striking photographs with essays describing the splendor found throughout Kentucky’s natural preserves and ecological areas. It was the first new statewide guide to appear in thirty years, making it an essential addition to the library or field pack of the wildflower enthusiast, naturalist, and the general outdoorsman.

Revered for his passions and loved by many, Barnes will not soon be forgotten. UPK sends their condolences to his family during this difficult time.

For Jane Gentry Vance, 1941 – 2014

Jane Gentry Vance Hunting for a Christmas Tree after Dark

A sudden mildness in the cold field.
Scraps of snow still strewn on the hillside.
The net of stars cast out overhead.
The shapes of old cedars come toward me
familiar as loved bodies approaching
from a long way off.
The creek in a hurry, as full of itself
as a zipper, the slow-melting snow.

I can hardly make out the rock fence
wavering up the hill, cold stone
on cold stone, stacked together
by unknown hands so many years ago.

How grateful I am for this moment of peace
my body has made with gravity, this
pulling things out of their places
and holding them in,
like Orion the hunter, who, when I blink,
seems to throw his leg over the low fence
of the horizon and climb into this bound with me.

Up ahead, looking for the one perfect tree,
my cousin John. His lantern bobs through
the dark meadow. He raises the globe
of light over and over in prospect.
I hang back, feeling rich in the black
waste, safe in his bowl of earth,
with rocks outcropping in the flattened grass,
trees wet, dirt sweetened by the downhill run-off
of all fear. Though the interstate throbs
and the town lights bleed into the blot
of circling trees, from here the stars redeem
the dark that makes them shine.

from What Comes Down to Us: 25 Contemporary Kentucky Poets. link

Bourbon Desserts: Always-in-the-Pantry Bourbon Pound Cake

Always-in-the-Pantry Bourbon Pound Cake

Always-in-the-Pantry Bourbon Pound Cake

“Bourbon does for me what the piece of cake did for Proust.”—Walker Percy

Why not combine the two?

What better way to celebrate National Bourbon Heritage Month than with this home-cook staple from Lynn Marie Hulsman’s Bourbon Desserts.

Introducing the recipe, Hulsman says, “The loveliest thing about about pound cake, though, is that it’s rootsy.” This is the kind of recipe that anyone with a well stocked home kitchen can make at just about any time. That’s not to say, however, that making a truly inspired pound cake doesn’t take a good deal of love and attention.

With that said: break out the whisks and get to baking. When you’re bourbon-loving friends drop by, you’ll be more than ready to entertain with this delicious cake.

Always-in-the-Pantry Bourbon Pound Cake

Makes two 8 x 4-inch loaves

2 cups (4 sticks) butter, cold (but not hard),
plus more for greasing pan
2½ cups granulated sugar
7 large eggs, at room temperature
4 cups cake flour, sifted before measuring
1 tablespoon bourbon

Continue reading

Biography Subject, Alonzo Cushing, Wins Medal of Honor

Almost 150 years after his death in the battle of Gettysburg in July of 1863, Alonzo Cushing, first lieutenant of Battery A, 4th U.S. Artillery, has received the Medal of Honor, the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. On Monday, President Obama officially bestowed the honor on Cushing along with Command Sergeant Major Adkins and Specialist Four Donald P. Sloat who both served and distinguished themselves during the Vietnam War.

Alonzo Cushing

Army First Lieutenant Alonzo H. Cushing

According to a statement released by the White House, “Army First Lieutenant Alonzo H. Cushing distinguished himself during combat operations against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Cemetery Ridge, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on July 3, 1863.” In Cushing of Gettysburg: The Story of a Union Artillery Commander, Kent Masterson Brown offers an expansive view of the life and career of Lt. Cushing. Brown, author of Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics, and the Pennsylvania Campaign and creator of The Civil War magazine, incorporates vivid descriptions of the fury of battle and the exhaustion of forced battles to honor the historic contributions of Cushing.

Cushing courageously led the Union troops to break Pickett’s Charge in the battle, even placing his thumb over the vent of a Confederate gun and having it burned to the bone. Shortly after this incident he was killed instantly by a gunshot to his face. His first sergeant, who survived the battle, was awarded the Medal of Honor.

In an NPR interview, Brown revealed that the Army War Decorations Board contacted him as

part of their verification process while vetting Cushing’s story. The board drew on Brown’s extensive knowledge of Cushing and the body of information that he had cultivated while writing Cushing of Gettysburg.

For many, though, Cushing’s award is long overdue. Residents in Cushing’s hometown of Delafield, Wisconsin; the former governor of Wisconsin, Jim Doyle; and many Facebook fans pushed for the recognition. Former U.S. Senator Russell D. Feingold endorsed Cushing’s nomination in 2003, and in March of 2010, Secretary of the Army John M. McHugh confirmed that the Army supported Cushing’s nomination, ending years of lobbying by descendants and admirers.

In Brown’s interview he closed saying, “I wonder whether Cushing may be the last Civil War soldier to receive it. And if he is, I’d like to think that it’s being given to him but on behalf of all those others who are going to go unnamed – that they will all share in Cushing’s award of the Medal of Honor because we’ll never be able to right all those, quote, ‘wrongs,’ unquote, of all those other soldiers who were equally valorous.”

Continue for an excerpt from Brown’s Cushing of Gettysburg: The Story of a Union Artillery Commander:

Continue reading

10 Books to Help You Celebrate Bourbon Heritage Month Like a Kentuckian

Nobody in Kentucky needs a reason to celebrate bourbon more than we already do each day, but if Congress wants to dedicate a whole month to the cause, we certainly won’t object. Thankfully, Congress did just that in 2007 when it declared September National Bourbon Heritage Month.

Over the past decade, bourbon has exploded on the national scene in a big way finally catching up with what Kentuckians knew all along. Here at the University Press of Kentucky, we’ve long been connoisseurs of the historic spirit so we’ve compiled a list books that should interest everyone from the bourbon historian to the home cook. Enjoy and read responsibly!


If it’s a month-long bourbon tour you’re looking for, this travel guide will not let you down.

Kentucky Bourbon Country: The Essential Travel Guide

Like wine lovers who dream of traveling to Bordeaux or beer enthusiasts with visions of the breweries of Belgium, bourbon lovers plan their pilgrimages to Kentucky’s bourbon country. And what a country it is! Some of the most famous distilleries are tucked away in the scenic countryside of the Bluegrass region, stretching between Louisville, Bardstown, and Lexington. Locals and tourists alike seek out the finest flavors of Kentucky as interest in America’s only native spirit continues to grow.

Continue reading

Press Play: Bourbon Desserts, The Air Force, and Remembering Emmett Till

This past Friday, August 29, the Wall Street Journal featured a review of Lynn Marie Hulsman’s Bourbon Desserts. Here’s a taste of what they had to say:

“Bourbon, compared with its older cousin, Scotch, has a hint of caramel sweetness to it, making it a natural flavoring agent for dessert. Ms. Hulsman’s recipes for cakes, cookies, custards, ice creams and other confections are not designed for the calorie-shy, but they may well enchant anyone with a sweet tooth and an interest in traditional and modern American cuisine. Her presentations are clear and concise, with short introductory paragraphs preceding her instructions.” —Wall Street Journal


For the past couple of weeks Robert M. Farley’s Grounded: The Case for Abolishing the United States Air Force has been stirring up some conversation in publications like Aviation Week and The Daily Beast as readers digest Farley’s thought-provoking book.

Farley himself has continued to contribute to that conversation writing recently in Real Clear Defense about the Air Force’s new strategic white paper:

“Addressed to ‘Airmen and Airpower Advocates,’ America’s Air Force: A Call to the Future sounds a lot of familiar notes. It hypes the concept of “strategic agility,” a worthy contribution, but ends up defining the service’s contribution in reactive terms.  A Call to the Future tackles procurement failures and speaks to the need for partnerships, but fails to contribute seriously to the most gripping procurement problem the Air Force currently faces – the F-35 – or to provide a framework for thinking about the failure of airpower partnerships in Iraq and Afghanistan.” —Real Clear Defense


Finally, Darryl Mace, author of In Remembrance of Emmett Till: Regional Stories and Media Responses to the Black Freedom Struggle, spoke with radio station WHYY to remember Emmett Till on the 59th anniversary of his murder. During their conversation, Mace compares the the media landscape when Till was killed with the one we face today:

It is a very different time. There is a desire for instant news. Everything is tweeted and everything is blogged. The 24-hour news cycle really makes people hungry to consume media… You can’t escape the media input now.

You can listen to Darryl Mace’s full interview on the subject matter at WHYY.