The Great Compromiser’s Mint Julep

Henry Clay

Enjoy a little taste of Kentucky history while sipping on this recipe straight out of Henry Clay’s diary. We can only imagine that between representing the state in Congress, serving as Secretary of State, and running for presidency, Clay liked to relax and unwind with the fine mint julep described below.

The mint leaves, fresh and tender, should be pressed against a coin-silver goblet with the back of a silver spoon. Only bruise the leaves gently and then remove them from the goblet. Half fill with cracked ice. Mellow bourbon, aged in oaken barrels, is poured from the jigger and allowed to slide slowly through the cracked ice.

In another receptacle, granulated sugar is slowly mixed into chilled limestone water to make a silvery mixture as smooth as some rare Egyptian oil, then poured on top of the ice. While beads of moisture gather on the burnished exterior of the silver goblet, garnish the brim of the goblet with the choicest sprigs of mint.

…simple, right?

Enter our giveaway this week for a chance to win The Kentucky Mint Julep by Colonel Joe Nickell! In it, you will find more famous Kentuckians’ favorite julep variations.

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About University Press of Kentucky

The University Press of Kentucky has a dual mission—the publication of books of high scholarly merit in a variety of fields for a largely academic audience and the publication of books about the history and culture of Kentucky, the Ohio Valley region, the Upper South, and Appalachia. The Press is the statewide mandated nonprofit scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, operated as an agency of the University of Kentucky and serving all state institutions of higher learning, plus five private colleges and Kentucky's two major historical societies.

One thought on “The Great Compromiser’s Mint Julep

  1. Pingback: Celebrate the Kentucky Derby With Henry Clay’s Mint Julep Recipe | Smart News

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