Merry Giftmas!

It’s everyone’s favorite time of year again! We are already knee-deep in the Christmas season, and yet there are still so many gifts to be bought. Instead of stuffing your loved-ones stockings with gift cards and candy, check out these awesome UPK books for a creative gift option that everybody in the family is sure to love. The best part is, if you order them through our website now through February 1st, 2015, you will receive 20% off just by entering the codes “FHOL” or “FSNO”. Happy gift-giving!

For the veteran: Grounded by Robert M. Farley

 

The United States needs airpower, but does it need an air force? In Grounded, Robert M. Farley persuasively argues that America should end the independence of the United States Air Force (USAF) and divide its assets and missions between the United States Army and the United States Navy.

 

For the history buff: Madam Belle by Maryjean Wall

Belle Brezing made a major career move when she stepped off the streets of Lexington, Kentucky, and into Jennie Hill’s bawdy house—an upscale brothel run out of a former residence of Mary Todd Lincoln. At nineteen, Brezing was already infamous as a youth steeped in death, sex, drugs, and scandal. But it was in Miss Hill’s “respectable” establishment that she began to acquire the skills, manners, and business contacts that allowed her to ascend to power and influence as an internationally known madam.

 

For the feminist: Violence against Women in Kentucky  by Carol E. Jordan

For more than two centuries, Kentucky women have fought for the right to vote, own property, control their wages, and be safe at home and in the workplace. Tragically, many of these women’s voices have been silenced by abuse and violence. In Violence against Women in Kentucky: A History of U.S. and State Legislative Reform, Carol E. Jordan chronicles the stories of those who have led the legislative fight for the last four decades to protect women from domestic violence, rape, stalking, and related crimes.

 

 

For the movie-goer: The Philosophy of Tim Burton edited by Jennifer L. McMahon

Director and producer Tim Burton impresses audiences with stunning visuals, sinister fantasy worlds, and characters whose personalities are strange and yet familiar. Drawing inspiration from sources as varied as Lewis Carroll, Salvador Dalí, Washington Irving, and Dr. Seuss, Burton’s creations frequently elicit both alarm and wonder. Whether crafting an offbeat animated feature, a box-office hit, a collection of short fiction, or an art exhibition, Burton pushes the envelope, and he has emerged as a powerful force in contemporary popular culture.

For the poet: Many-Storied House by George Ella Lyon

 

Born in the small, eastern Kentucky coal-mining town of Harlan, George Ella Lyon began her career with Mountain, a chapbook of poems. She has since published many more books in multiple genres and for readers of all ages, but poetry remains at the heart of her work. Many-Storied House is her fifth collection.

 

For the UK fan: Wildcat Memories by Doug Brunk

Wildcat Memories illuminates the intimate connection between the UK basketball program and the commonwealth. Author Doug Brunk brings together some of the program’s greatest coaches, players, and personalities to reflect on Kentuckians who provided inspiration, guidance, and moral support during their tenure as Wildcats. Featuring personal essays and behind-the-scenes stories from Kentucky legends Wallace “Wah Wah” Jones, Dan Issel, Joe B. Hall, Kyle Macy, and Tubby Smith, as well as newcomers Patrick Patterson, Darius Miller, and John Wall, this heartfelt collection shares an inside look at what makes UK basketball extraordinary.

For the chef: The Duncan Hines trilogy
Duncan Hines: How a Traveling Salesman Became the Most Trusted Name in Food by Louis Hatchett
Adventures in Good Cooking by Duncan Hines, edited by Louis Hatchett
The Dessert Book
by Duncan Hines, edited by Louis Hatchett

              

Duncan Hines (1880–1959) may be best known for the cake mixes, baked goods, and
bread products that bear his name, but most people forget that he was a real person
and not just a fictitious figure invented for the brand. America’s pioneer restaurant critic,
Hines discovered his passion while working as a traveling salesman during the 1920s
and 1930s—a time when food standards were poorly enforced and safety was a
constant concern. He traveled across America discovering restaurants and offering his
recommendations to readers in his best-selling compilation Adventures in Good Eating
(1935). The success of this work and of his subsequent publications led Hines to
manufacture the extremely popular food products that we still enjoy today.

For the horse lover: The Kentucky Derby by James C. Nicholson

Each year on the first Saturday in May, the world turns its attention to the twin spires of Churchill Downs for the high-stakes excitement of the “greatest two minutes in sports,”  the Kentucky Derby. No American sporting event can claim the history, tradition, or pageantry that the Kentucky Derby holds. For more than 130 years, spectators have been fascinated by the magnificent horses that run the Louisville track. Thoroughbreds such as Secretariat and Barbaro have earned instant international fame, along with jockeys such as Isaac Murphy, Ron Turcotte, and Calvin Borel. The Kentucky Derby: How the Run for the Roses Became America’s Premier Sporting Event calls this great tradition to post and illuminates its history and culture.

 

Friday Night Spotlight: Charles Walters

Charles Walters TCM Friday Night Spotlight

Good news classic film fans, all throughout December, Turner Classic Movies is hosting a spotlight on the legendary Hollywood director and choreographer, Charles Walters! This marathon of movies will occur every Friday of this month, so be sure to tune in. The schedule of films is listed in the calendar below. If you have Time Warner Cable, you will find these movies on channel 608. For other cable providers, you can to go TCM’s website and use their live streaming feature!

To prepare yourself for this film extravaganza, check out our recently published book on Charles Walters!

In this first full-length biography of Walters, Brent Phillips chronicles Walter’s career on Broadway and his successes at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Phillips recounts Walter’s associations with Lucille Ball, Joan Crawford, Gloria Swanson, among many others, and examines his uncredited work on several films, including the blockbuster Gigi. This revealing book also considers Walter’s personal life and explores how he navigated the industry as an openly gay man. Drawing on unpublished oral histories, correspondence, and new interviews, this biography offers an entertaining and important new look at an exciting era in Hollywood history.

      

 

 

 

 

 

From Walters’ directing expertise to his flashy choreography, this is a spotlight series you don’t want to miss!

UK Libraries and University Press of Kentucky Deliver Access to More than 1,000 Titles

kentucky votesIn a collaborative project placing the University of Kentucky at the forefront of national trends in academic publishing, University of Kentucky Libraries and the University Press of Kentucky (UPK) are providing digital access to more than 1,000 books published by UPK over the course of its 45 year history freely available to students and researchers in the UK community.

More than 600 of the texts are already available in UKnowledge, a digital collection of scholarship created by UK Libraries. With the debut of the UPK project, UKnowledge becomes the primary access point for the research and scholarship published by UPK. More UPK titles will debut in the collection in coming months.

“This digitization project represents a commitment by UK Libraries and the University Press of Kentucky to provide access to these texts to the scholarly community most likely to need them: UK students and faculty. It makes one of the most valuable research collections available to the UK community through UKnowledge,” said Mary Beth Thomson, senior associate dean of UK Libraries.

The books now available through UKnowledge cover a broad spectrum of titles published by UPK including: Appalachian studies, history, and literary studies, broad selections of American and British literature, and all the books in UPK’s Studies in Romance Languages series edited by late UK professor emeritus of Spanish John E. Keller. Authors such as Maria Braden, Thomas D. Clark, Gladys M. Kammerer, and P.P. Karan are represented in this collection.

she said what“None of these titles were available as an ebook prior to this, and many had been out-of-print for years,” said Stephen M. Wrinn, director of UPK. Starting in early 2015, nearly 400 previously out-of-print books that were digitized as part of the project will be released by UPK as ebooks.

Among the works being brought back into print are books by former Kentucky Historian Laureate Thomas D. Clark and former UK history professor Carl B. Cone, as well as UK political science professor Malcolm Jewell’s three-volume collection of state election statistics, Kentucky Votes.

The public announcement of this project falls during University Press Week, Nov. 9 – 15, which President Jimmy Carter initiated in 1978 to promote “the impact, both here and abroad, of American university presses on culture and scholarship.”

japanese landscapesUPK director of sales and marketing Amy Harris, UK Libraries senior associate dean Mary Beth Thomson, and Ingram Content Group Manager John Hussey presented a panel discussion on the project. “Coming Together: Successful Press, Library, Vendor Content Collaboration: A Case Study” on Friday, November 7 at the 2014 Charleston Conference.

For more information or to browse the UPK titles available online through UKnowledge, members of the UK Community can visit http://uknowledge.uky.edu/upk/.

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#UPWeek Day 5: Follow Friday

We’ve come to the end of #UPWeek 2014 and today’s bloggers are spreading the love with a little #FollowFriday action. They’ll be discussing some of the most interesting new fields of research that they’re following or who is a must follow for them on social media.

upw-poster-2014Columbia University Press: “Every Friday, the Columbia University Press blog runs a post called the University Press Roundup in which we highlight posts from around the academic publishing blogosphere. Our Blog Tour post will explain how and why we have made this commitment to a blog series that rarely features our own titles. We will discuss how university press blogs generate publicity for individual titles, but also provide a much-needed environment where scholarship can be presented for a general readership.”

University of Illinois Press: A post discussing the emerging topics and authors in our Geopolitics of Information series.

Island Press: A post about what editors are paying attention to and why those scholars/fields are important.

University of Minnesota Press: John Hartigan, participating in the new Forerunners (short-form publishing) series, is writing a post about the ways in which he uses social media to enhance scholarly connections and establish social-media conversations with regard to his research.

University of Nebraska Press: How should UPs be adding to the conversation on social media and who is doing it right? UNP marketing takes a look at the potential social media has for scholarly publishing.

NYU Press: A post on their forthcoming website for the book, Keywords for American Cultural Studies (Second Edition).

The University Press of Kentucky would like to thank everyone who has participated this week whether it’s blogging, tweeting, or sharing those #UPShelfies. To take a look back at the week here are links to the previous daily rounds from #UPWeek 2014.

Day 1: Collaboration / Day 2: Your University Press in Pictures / Day 3: University Presses in Popular Culture / Day 4: Throwback Thursday

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#UPWeek Day 4: Throwback Thursday

We’re heading into the homestretch of University Press Week 2014 and today’s theme is a look back with Throwback Thursday.


 

Screen Shot 2014-11-13 at 11.18.06 AMHarvard University Press: “Late last year we made roughly 3,000 previously unavailable backlist works available again. They go back as far as the late 1800s. While prepping the data, we kept a running list of titles that were really showing their age. Our post will share some of the more ridiculous ones.”

MIT Press: A look back at former MIT Press designer Muriel Cooper. She designed MIT Press’s iconic colophon 50 years ago in 1964.

Temple University Press: A post describing the development of our influential Asian History and Culture series.

University of Washington Press: A look at the recently reissued series of Asian American classics, with an emphasis on cover design then and now.

Wesleyan University Press: This Throwback Thursday selection is “Flowers of the Foothills & Mountain Valleys” from Alice Notley’s 2006 collection Grave of Light: New and Selected Poems, 1970-2005. The cover of her book Grave of Light is a reproduction of a beautiful collage created by Notley.


 

Don’t forget to follow along throughout the day on Twitter with #UPweek. And it’s still not too late to submit an awesome #UPShelfie.

Stay tuned and don’t miss Friday’s theme: Follow Friday!

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His Life on the Blacklist, or How Communists Brought Us the “Cran-stache” #UPWeek

Fans of the hit television show Breaking Bad have grown accustomed to seeing Bryan Cranston donning a mustache to play Walter White. But, at this year’s Emmy Awards, the “Cran-stache” came out for a different reason. . .

Cran-stache

. . . for his starring role as blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo in the forthcoming film Trumbo, directed by Jay Roach. The new mustache was perhaps just as memorable as Cranston’s Emmys makeout session with Best Actress-winner Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

Trumbo made a name for himself as a screenwriter, playwright, and author, but he is also remembered as one of the Hollywood Ten who opposed the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). Refusing to answer questions about his prior involvement with the Communist Party, Trumbo sacrificed a successful career in Hollywood to stand up for his rights and defend political freedom.

Roach’s screenplay for Trumbo is based on the book Dalton Trumbo by Bruce Cook. Cook’s 1976 biography was largely based on a series of interviews with Trumbo himself, in which Cook admitted he was too “embarrassed” to ask the writer about his Communist Party affiliations.

Dalton Trumbo BookForthcoming in January 2015Dalton Trumbo: Blacklisted Hollywood Radical, builds on Cook’s previous work through extensive research by Trumbo’s son, Christopher, and coauthor Larry Ceplair, primarily through the reams of carefully-worded letters Trumbo wrote throughout his life. Trumbo wrote thousands of letters that served as a journal of sorts, keeping track of the important events and people in his life and the battles he fought.

According to Christopher Trumbo, “That he was writing humorous and graceful letters at the same time as he was handling all that other stuff gave the audience a larger picture of what he was like.”

With regard to all “that other stuff,” Trumbo’s political beliefs continually evolved. He joined (and later left) the Communist Party twice in his life. But, in the anti-Communist boiler that was mid-century Hollywood, Trumbo’s membership in the party told them all they need to know about his politics. In a cover letter that accompanied several dozen boxes of his papers sent to the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research in 1962, Trumbo wrote:

I’ve always thought of my life as a series of conflicts, each a separate battle, segregated in my mind under the heading, “My fight with these guys” or “My fight with those guys.” In thinking back I now realize I have regarded each fight as distinct and unrelated to the other, and have sometimes marveled how one man could have so many of them. I now realize it was all one fight; that the relation of each to the other was very close; and I am really no more combative than any other man. It just happened in my case that the original fight once undertaken, expanded marvelously into what seemed like many fights and the most recent in a sequence of fights is actually no more than the current phase of the primary engagement.

The blacklist ended for Trumbo in 1960, when he received screen credits for Exodus and Spartacus. Just before his death, he received a long-delayed Academy Award for The Brave One, and in 1993, he was posthumously given an Academy Award for Roman Holiday (1953).

And as for Bryan Cranston’s faithful display of facial hair for the upcoming biopic?

From the introduction:

He almost always wore a mustache. . . . He periodically changed the shape and style of his mustache, going from a pencil-thin one in the 1930s to one that was bushier, carefully shaped, and, of course, whiter. He was very fastidious about his mustache. “He shaved every morning,” Mitzi [his daughter] said, “and he had a little comb for his mustache. Once, he became annoyed that nobody had noticed a change he had made in his facial hair.”

Dalton Trumbo Writing

Dalton Trumbo writing in his bath tub. Photo by Mitzi Trumbo.

Bryan Cranston Dalton Trumbo Mustache

Bryan Cranston at the 2014 Emmy Awards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See what’s happening for #UPWeek from other #AAUP Member Presses:

  • Princeton University Press on their book Alan Turing: The Enigma and the new, highly-acclaimed movie tie-in starring Benedict Cumberbatch.
  • Georgetown University Press has built an impressive list of espionage titles. You may have noticed quite a few spy thrillers (TurnSleepy HollowThe Assests) on your DVR of late.
  • The University Press of Mississippi highlights their book, Walt Before Mickey. Now a major motion picture opening Thanksgiving weekend.
  • University Press of Wisconsin‘s blog is Ripped from the Headlines! Featuring timely, newsbreaking titles.
  • University of Pennsylvania Press features some of their books that appeal to a general audience. But they’re also trying to find ways to speed up the publishing process and release books that address topical issues as they are happening. University Presses aren’t simply places where dry tomes on minutiae get into print; they are places where all the world’s knowledge finds a voice.
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#UPWeek Day 2: Your University Press in Pictures

It’s day 2 of the University Press Week 2014!

First off, a big thanks to everyone who’s been sharing, tweeting (#upweek), and learning with us as well as the rest of the UP community. Today’s theme is Your University Press in Pictures and the bloggers have gone all out!


UPF in Pictures through the Years

University Press of Florida: This post looks at UPF in pictures through the years.


 

We’ve Come A Long Way Since 1907! #UPWEEK Blog Tour

Fordham University Press: A photo collage featuring FUP events and memorable moments over the years.


 

#UPWeek blog tour: A brief history of IU Press in pictures

Indiana University Press: A fun look at the history of Indiana university Press as they celebrate their 65th anniversary next year.


 

Celebrating University Press Week: JHUP in Pictures

Johns Hopkins University Press: Q&A with JHUP Art Director Martha Sewell and short film of author and marine illustrator Val Kells in her studio.


 

TO MAKE A BOOK (CIRCA 1960)

Stanford University Press: A post featuring old B&W photos of the press and its printing facilities as they existed in the ’50s and ’60s that really highlight the artistry and crafstmanship that goes into print publishing.


The quality of posts so far this year for #upweek have been incredible. We’re hoping to continue that trend when it’s our turn as we tackle tomorrow’s theme: University Presses in Popular Culture.

Until then, take a #UPShelfie!